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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 8:26 am 
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Location: Pensacola, Fl.
When I tell people about my new Hobie sailing kayak I tell them it has two outriggers. If I told them it had two amas no one would know what I was talking about. They would probably joke about it, "Two Amos and no Andy?"

Does everyone use "ama" instead of "outrigger" these days? There was a fine restaurant in Orange Beach Alabama called "The Outrigger". Unfortunately it was completely destroyed by Hurricane Ivan. But if they rebuilt it would they call it "The Ama?" Somehow that just does not have the same ring to it. :?


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 8:43 am 
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If I am talking to non-AI people, they are outriggers. On this forum, it is akas and amas. Everybody likes a little jargon in their life--maybe it makes them feel important. However, there are 2 parts to the AI outriggers: an aka and an ama and in discussions it is often necessary to distinquish them.

Keith


Last edited by Chekika on Wed Dec 03, 2008 10:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 9:01 am 
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we use outriggers when talking to customers.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The aka of a multihull sailboat is a member of the framework that connects the hull to the ama(s) (outrigger). The term aka originated with the proa, but is also applied to modern trimarans. [1]

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 12:07 pm 
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Location: Bairnsdale, Victoria Australia
Maybe I was responsible for starting off these names when as a small child I fell off a Port Phillip pier and hurt myself and then yelled out....

'Amar', I think I have damaged my 'Akas'. She took me to the doctors. Pirate :wink:


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 1:07 pm 
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Location: Punta Gorda, FL
Why does virtually no one use the Polynesian term for the main hull, when we use their terms for the amas and akas?


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 4:40 pm 
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Location: Northern VA
When rigged for sailing, with the amas and akas attached, the main hull is a vaka. When not sailing, it's a kayak. Of course, I tend to sail a whole lot more than I kayak. I do use the correct terms, and not because I'm trying to impress anyone. I'm an engineer, so technical accuracy is kinda ingrained in my nature. What has surprised me over the past two years, however, is the number of people who actually do know the correct terms.

Happy sailing,
- Jim L


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 5:33 pm 
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Location: Ettalong Beach, Central Coast, Australia
Jim_L wrote:
When rigged for sailing, with the amas and akas attached, the main hull is a vaka.


Well that is such a rare word, even Google doesn't know, other than to say its a girls name from the original sanskrit.

Geoff


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2008 6:33 am 
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It's an obscure word outside the multihull sailing community. I learned of it when I owned a Corsair F-27, but I still would tend to refer to "the hull" instead of "the vaka".

I think the larger hull is also called a vaka on proas. But then, the larger, main hull usually carries the sail on a proa. Makes me wonder what we're supposed to call the pieces of sailrocket. ;)


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 12:09 am 
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Location: Hawaii, Big Island
It is ama, not amas. No plural s.

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