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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 6:20 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 23, 2011 8:37 am
Posts: 107
Hi,

So I have 1/2 down on a TI, with tramps a trailer and the new beach cart. I'm simply waiting for spring to pick her up. I live far enough north, that unfortunately, until almost June the water is effectively liquid ice.

I gots 2 questions:

I have no sense how long a typical enjoyable excursion would last. Err would be? I'm talking interns of distance and or time? I live on a lake that is about 30 miles long that runs north and south. The prevailing winds are from the north west.

Can I trek down to the south end of the lake, or would the trip back kill me? When people go out is a typical trip 2 miles or 15 miles, err whatever. I have absolutely no sense of what kind of distances we are talking about here. And after a 4 hour sail are you burned out from peddling?

Also, do I need a wet suit, or a dry suit? The water temperature never makes it out of the low seventies. But I would only be sailing between June anew September 1st.

Thanks!


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 9:25 am 
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Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2010 10:07 pm
Posts: 169
Congrads on your new boat you're going to love it. Firstly time and distance out will build up from say 2hrs - 6hrs as you spend time in the saddle so to speak. My typical day out is 4-5 hours distance 30 - 40 kms depending on wind strength and temp. Being on a lake has its advantages - plan your trip so you reach as much as possible (wind angle about 90').

Regarding wetsuit choice I can't help as I don't wear one in Sydney, best advice I got was build your kit up slowly and buy the best, only when you're sure you need it. Keep your accessories to a minimum and enjoy the boat.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 9:27 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:18 am
Posts: 1304
Location: Sarasota,Key West FL
leelanauX:
We do most of our sailing in the ocean splitting our time between the Tampa bay area and Key West (Florida Keys) which is a probably different situation from yours. Our typical trips are 20-40 mile day trips (seldom overnight). We use our TI for mostly scuba diving/snorkling, spear fishing, and island hopping. Figuring your boat to average around 5mph, a good day for you would be 3 hrs to somewhere (15 miles), and 3-4 hrs back to the same launch point.
Since we travel in open water alot I installed an emergency gas motor on my TI (my just in case motor) and always 50 miles worth of fuel (1 gallon). The motor was seldom used, anytime I needed it we were usually in dire straights. On one trip we were 15 miles west of Key West and ran aground on a shoal and broke the rudder, making it impossible to sail upwind against a 15 mph headwind. We used the motor to get back to Key West. Both my wife and I can peddle the TI for 8-10 hours on one day, then get up and do it again the next day, so lets say your wind dies and your still 5 miles from launch, it's not a major problem to peddle home (unless you are fighting a strong current (up river, tides, etc), of course you will need to build up you legs for the task, don't try it on your first outing. If your legs get tired, you can always paddle also. Around here often the winds are very light (5-7 mph) so we typically leave the sail up, and also peddle to maintain a decent speed (almost always faster with the sail up verses sail down). Actually the TI is one of the few boats out there that can generate it's own wind By peddling while sailing in very light winds somehow the sail works as a wind amplifier, where when everyone else is in irons, we pass them all up pedaling lightly with the sail pulled tight and waving as we pass by them.
In the winter in Key West the water gets down to about 70f, I always have a wet suit on board just in case something happens. I can get my shorty wet suit on in the water, and if I get colder I also put on a bib wetsuit that covers my core and legs with a double layer (2 x 3mm = 6 mm wetsuit). The bad thing about a dry suit is if it's warm and you have the suit open to stay cool, then go over, the dry suit becomes a weight as it fills with water (pretty useless). So for the dry suit to work it must be sealed at all times (pretty tough when it's 80 degrees and sunny). Plus it makes a difference how far from shore you plan to go, if you only go a few hundred feet from shore, most of us can swim to shore without a wetsuit. But then again it's all what your body is used to, I grew up in Canada, in the summertime the water only ever gets to 70f, it never stopped us from swimming, sailing, and diving most of the day. But it all depends on what you are used to, and there is always less risk with groups of boats.
Hope this helps
Bob


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 6:14 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:02 am
Posts: 325
Location: Cape Coral, FL
Hi,

Welcome to the club! The TI is fun and versital craft.

Most of my trips last three hours or so, couple were 5 to 8, and one has been 3 days. The easier it is to set up and launch your boat the more you will use it. I've been out for a half hour because that is what I could squeeze in.

Always head up wind if you don't have a destination or you will want someone to pick you up... Lol.

Start with a decent rain coat and figure out how much cold you tolerate. The TI can be very wet in rough weather but plenty dry in lighter winds

Cheers!

J

_________________
2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 6:33 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 08, 2009 5:06 am
Posts: 1575
Location: Lake Macquarie NSW AUSTRALIA
Welcome Lee. Totally agree with others here. As far as equipment goes, start simple and build. Unless you have bottomless pockets, you'll find plenty to spend your money on over the next year. There is probably no typical trip for me. It's whatever I can fit in on the day or days at hand. The Lake I live on is only 18 miles North to South and I live 1/2 way up the Western shore. I generally do the Northern end or the Southern end in a days sailing but have yet to do the lot. I spose I'm more into seeing the sights rather that breaking any records.

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Don't take life too seriously................it ain't permanent.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 11:22 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:53 pm
Posts: 11
Are you in the North East or Northwest ?. I use a 3mm wetsuit in the pacific northwest, and hit the ocean from June to August.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 6:09 am 
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Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 5:30 am
Posts: 270
Location: Clearwater, Fl
By chance is the lake you sail on named Lake Leelanau like your username ? That would be the perfect lake to take an AI/TI. When I was growing up, we went there every year @ Billman's Beach. A few years ago my wife and I spent a week vacation not far from there on Suttons Bay and I brought my AI. It was a great place to sail.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 7:51 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 23, 2011 8:37 am
Posts: 107
Hi guys,

I,m in the Midwest. Not northeast or the west. I am on Lake Leelanau. The North Lake. The water is cold and crystal clear. Not to plug the area but Little know fact that last summer Good Morning America held a summer vacation pole to determine "the most beautiful place in America" Sleeping Bear National Lake shore came in number one. It is almost completely unknow outside of Ohio and Michigan, but the Leelanau Penninsula is stunningly (no hyperbole there) beautiful.

The great lakes are actually referred to as inland seas, and honestly have more in common in some ways with oceans than lakes. I know I'm on a soapbox here but I 've travelled all over and am often surprised by how few people even know how jaw dropping leelanau county is.

I'm just hoping the sailing is good. It will be my first time sailing. And the cold water makes me a bit concerned that the TI is the wrong boat. Obviously we rant talking about Hawaii.

Sorry to drone on about Leelanau county, but if you've never been to Sleeping Bear, it really should be a bucket list item, it's that beautiful.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 5:29 am 
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Joined: Fri May 08, 2009 5:06 am
Posts: 1575
Location: Lake Macquarie NSW AUSTRALIA
Well you have just boxed yourself into a corner. You now have no excuse for not submitting the most stunning photos ever seen in the 2012 AI / TI Photo Comp :D

You're allowed to jump around on your soapbox here. Why shouldn't you be proud of your own patch.

Back to your original question, it sounds like a drysuit may suit your neck of the woods, if it gets that cold and wet. But I guarantee that a TI is definitely the right boat for the job. In a spot like that, simplicity sailing sounds like the best formula to take in the beauty of the place. Last thing you need is some heavy cumbersome complicated boat that will distract you from what you're really there for. And it doesn't get much simpler than a TI.

Best of luck with it.

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Don't take life too seriously................it ain't permanent.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 5:54 am 
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Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 5:30 am
Posts: 270
Location: Clearwater, Fl
Leelanaux ... I totally agree with you about that area. I love it and lived there for several years in the 70's.

And Lake Leelaneau is the best lake possible for a TI or AI. These boats can take on some pretty serious conditions so don't worry ... just exercise common sense safety. You'll love it once you get underway. I wish I had time to drive up there and join you in a sail ... and maybe I will as my sister rents a cottage on Lake Leelanau every summer and invites us to join her.

Slaughter is right ... now you're committed to posting pictures of sailing your TI on the lake.

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Jim


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 6:11 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 23, 2011 8:37 am
Posts: 107
Hi Jim,

Yes please. If anyone ends up in the Traverse city area please let me know. I'd love to go sailing with someone. About two years ago, I saw a TI on a trailer in the town of Leland Michigan, which is a quaint little town at the northen tip of the lake. That's the only Ai or TI I've ever seem in the area. And because it's a Penninsula dotted with countless lakes of every size, with grand traverse bay on its eastern shore, and lake Michigan on its western shore there are ALOT of boats.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2012 11:45 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2012 9:12 pm
Posts: 42
Location: South Florida
Hi Lee, I have my TI for about 3 months now and have sailed to go camping and fishing 6 times the first 5 outings I sailed between 15 and 20 miles to and from camp site including some sailing for fishing to near by islands, the last trip this past weekend I sailed to go camping and fishing for the first time with Keith a felow member of this forum, we loged aprox 30 miles to and from camp site including fishing at near by islands. So Jim do not worry about going to far as the boat is quite capable of any treck on a 30 mile lake.

Gil


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 5:39 am 
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Location: Weymouth, Dorset.UK
I live and sail on the south west coast, water about 8 degrees building up to 15/16 degrees or so by the end of the summer, I find a breathable drysuit ideal(best investment I ever made), it has a one piece fleece suit for cooler days, a pair of shorts and a t-shirt get used on the warmer days. A manmade fiber T shirt helps wick the moisture away from your body and into the air by your drysuit, very comfy even when peddling in light winds, I always have a spare fleece in a dry bag. On very hot days a short wetsuit is OK for inshore work in light winds, I do find a stiffer pair of neoprene sailing boots easier to peddle with.

You can get very cool just sitting down in the wind and spray, a hot flask and a choccy bar helps pass the day, a decent cuppa while you sail, how wonderful!


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 11:09 am 
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Joined: Mon May 31, 2010 4:13 pm
Posts: 199
Location: oki - jp
I think I need to brushup on my british slang and vocab :D

Ummmm choccy bar.....


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 4:44 am
Posts: 38
Location: Weymouth, Dorset.UK
Chocolate..... do you call chocolate 'candy'?


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