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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 8:59 am 
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Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 6:21 pm
Posts: 22
Location: Beach Haven, NJ
I've seen a lot of great recommendations across the threads on possible emergency supplies (food/h2o), procedures (float plans), equipment (GPS/chart, torqeedo, offshore radio), spares (rudder pin), and other such best practices. Is there a good consolidated reference for essential boat setup and supplies you'd recommend for someone interested in venturing further offshore on day trips (not extended or overnight)? What is a minimum setup you'd recommend before considering this on my TI with a focus on safety? What essential spare parts would you bring on any outing, etc.? Thanks, Rich


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 4:04 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:21 pm
Posts: 2229
Location: Maui, Hawaii
EPIRB or PLB
Marine radio(s) with spare Marine radio or spare battery for your main radio
Knife, needle-nose pliers or leatherman
GPS
hand bilge pump & sponge
2 small waterproof flashlights
Every little tool for each nut/bolt/screw on the boat (Stainless Steel if possible)
Every little replaceable part on the boat (multiple) Rudder pins, shear bolts, drain plugs, cotterpins or rings
Wire-ties and spare small strong lines (Spectra?)
duct-tape
Throw-rope bag
If in an AI, a spare Mirage drive
2 paddles, one strait with a "T" handle
leashes on everything in and on the boat, including surfboard "Captains" leash for when solo or in rough conditions.

I'm sure there's more...

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http://KayakingBob.com - - - - - Hobie Island Sailing since 2006 - - - - - 2011 & 2012 Hobie AIs and a 2012 TI


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 4:38 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 1474
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Adding to Kayakingbob's excellent list...

Hand bearing compass
2 red hand flares
2 orange smoke flares
2 sea marker dyes
good first aid kit
anchor lines, 25 and 50 yard length with joining shackles
Sea anchor (drift chute)
space blanket
Dry bag with extra clothes
SOLAS strobe light

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Tony Stott
2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM"
www.scenefromabove.com.au


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 6:45 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:18 am
Posts: 1239
Location: Sarasota,Key West FL
If you plan to go more than 2 miles off shore you have to comply with us coast guard requirements, (and they do enforce them). Go to their web site, it's actually a good idea to ask them to check your boat if you see them out and about ( but not busy), most are very friendly and want to see your boat anyway.
We mostly sail offshore down around key west and the keys where you don't want to get caught in the strong currents and the Gulf Stream. We have our TI kind of rigged for open water and sometimes long distances (we are scuba divers). I have massive sails on mine and an emergency outboard that has saved our bacon many times.
If you go off shore having a boatUS membership is advised, otherwise retrieving a broken boat will cost more than the boat costs ( the coast guard will not retrieve your boat).
We also always stow an emergency inflatable life raft just in case. I recommend at least a couple non electric compasses and current paper charts be carried on board ( a CG requirement). Most important is to file a float plan with someone who knows who to contact if you are overdue. Plus all the good suggestions above. Down here we try to plot our routes by island hopping when possible, and it's really important to have good local knowledge. Multiple boats are always safer. And most important know the weather and check from multiple sources.
Hope this helps you.
Bob


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 6:55 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2012 12:24 pm
Posts: 73
Location: NJ
Most important is having a someone with you that has all that stuff with them too :mrgreen:

My biggest concerns are bilge pump an backup bilge, two paddles, spare parts an tools, radio w/gps and backup comm device, float plan, enough water for a few days, enough sunblock for a few days, etc, etc, etc......just think about all the things you would need/want if you cant make it back to shore


-Jeff


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 9:35 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:17 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Northwest Florida
I generally agree with the previous posters on what to include. In my case I am often 5-6 miles off the beach or many miles from home if I am on a multi-day trip. Two items I strongly encourage are:

Emergency Drinking Water - I always have at least a gallon with me. If I am fishing this gallon can be frozen before I leave and be part of my ice supply to keep my catch cold. I keep it in small sealable bottles so it fits in the catch bag to make it easier to handle. This is in addition to the gallon or so of water I always leave with. It is the water I expect to drink if my return is delayed or of I need extra water for first aid purposes.

Bilge Pump - I strongly recommend setting up your bilge pump so that it can be used without opening any hatches. Also, make sure the bilge pump cannot be forgotten or dropped overboard.

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Martin Hochberg
Tandem Island 2012


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 9:42 am 
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Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 2:53 am
Posts: 192
Location: Sollentuna, Sweden, Europe
This is my bilge pump solution. It works. Tested IRL.
I can open my hatch without getting water to come in.


Image

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That's a lot of safety equipment you carry with you!
For a day trip 2 miles off shore I whould have my dry suit, GPS, PFD and 2 cell phones.
Water and food. No extra Mirage Drive but some spare parts and tools are ALLWAYS in the AI.
On my wish list is a PLB.

br
thomas


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 10:02 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 11:19 am
Posts: 38
Location: Southern Maryland
I read no mention of a Spot Messenger, I guess no one uses these devices? I have been using one for years and feel that it is essential if there's a chance I'll get in trouble. I also carry a DSC enabled radio but I like knowing that there are people standing by for me that I can contact via satellite communication. They will orchestrate rescue if necessary.

Sent from my Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 Edition


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 10:59 am 
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Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 1474
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
EPIRBs and PLBs are internationally accepted by authorities in many countres. SPOT devices at this stage do not enjoy the same approval levels.

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Tony Stott
2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM"
www.scenefromabove.com.au


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 11:40 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 11:19 am
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Location: Southern Maryland
True, but you have to depend on someone hearing your fists call vice people on standby at Spot. I know it's not likely that your call on an EPIRB wouldn't be heard but there is little information conveyed as compared to a properly setup Spot device. A DSC radio can help coordinate help once your Spot message is sent and received. That's been my theory. Spot services also includes rescue insurance. The last thing you need after a successful rescue is a big bill from the Coast Guard our other rescue services. I know from experience that it's tough to get the Coast Guard to respond depending were you are. I live on the Chesapeake Bay and a call was made for an over turned boat last winter. The guys were pulled from the water by two buddies of mine. A call was issued but the Coast Guard never responded. Two private vessels saved all the guys. I'm pretty sure Spot would have contacted all of the available emergency services in the area, emergency contracts and made sure the rescue was being conducted.

Sent from my Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 Edition


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:49 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 2:31 pm
Posts: 2679
Location: Kailua 96734
Sail with a Buddy, who has a good head on her shoulders...


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:54 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:21 pm
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Location: Maui, Hawaii
NOHUHU wrote:
Sail with a Buddy, who has a good head on her shoulders...

Your wife monitoring the forums again?? :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 2:54 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 2:31 pm
Posts: 2679
Location: Kailua 96734
Probably. :roll: But every time there's a discussion re safety and emergency gear, and we start building lists, it occurs to me how important it is to have company on a trip offshore, and that it be someone you can trust. Someone like you comes to mind.

In a true emergency, (when that eagle ray flies out of nowhere and tries to take my head off, etc), it likely will be me, not the boat that is crippled or impaired. At that point, I would trade just about anything for a good life jacket, a good radio and a good friend.

When weighing what to take along on my next epic sail, I consider what gives me the greatest margin of safety. A spare friend is at the top of my list.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 3:14 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:14 pm
Posts: 1860
Location: South Florida
NOHUHU's, KB's, and Thomas' comments are on the mark.

I've used a SPOT regularly for the past 3-4 yrs. When I'm on a camp trip, I usually send an "OK" message morning and night each day camping. I always consider the ride to/from the launch (often 60-80 mi each way) to be the most dangerous part of the trip. I send an "OK" when I get to my final trip destination and a final one when I get home. As far as I know, all have been successful. I carry my SPOT tethered to my PFD whenever sailing my AI, but only send OK messages when I'm camping.

When traveling, like in the Rockies, I try to send a SPOT message at the end of the day. If we are on a camping trip in the Rockies or elsewhere in the west, it is the standard routine.

I have a PLB but seldom take it on trips.

Keith

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:16 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 2:53 am
Posts: 192
Location: Sollentuna, Sweden, Europe
There are som differences between a spot and a PLB.

1. How they communicate. (experts can define it clear, I can not)
2. Where the call is recieved (that differs in what area/country you are)
3. Not possible to send an "I am ok" from a PLB (when you need help - you press the button)

And, of course, who have the best possibilities to help you, they who recieve a spot call or they who recieve the PLB call.
Ie the fastest, quickest (maybe also differs what area/country you are in).

Of course a relieble friend is on my wish list and I also forgot to say that good planning is essential and keep an eye on the weather forecast.

br thomas


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