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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 5:45 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 3:21 am
Posts: 75
Location: Clearwater, Fl
I've gone out a couple times in some rough and windy weather and can't help wondering if it's possible for the wind to catch you just right and flip the AI over. Has this happened to anyone here?

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Clearwater, Fl


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 6:25 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:12 am
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Location: Florida
After 1 year and average use of 2-3 times a week - no tip overs.

2 close calls. Once on the itracoastal where some megahuge yacht come blasting by full throttle. It created a sudden 5' boat wake and I was in shallow area. I figured I would wake-ride and sail. I got caught at an odd angle and felt the boat roll laterally with the wave. Boat recoverd nicely - but I had never tipped so far over to one side before.

Second time, I had full sail up and was blasting along in 12mph+ wind. I had the lee side ama buried most of the day, medium reach. Out of nowhere a freak gust of wind hit me, as a thunderstorm was brewing. Probable a 30mph+ gust. Felt whole boat list suddenly leeward, ama waay under the water. The whole boat felt like it wanted to tip over, but I leaned and quickly de-powerd the sail and was OK.

Based on experience it would take a lot to fully tip one over or make it go turtle. Wind would have to be at a right angle to the boat. On windy days I keep the sheet line wrapped around my hand. I feel the quickest action you could take is to de-power the sail by giving it a bunch of slack. Then reef in the sail a little. If you think about how too much wind would tip over the boat - as the mast tilts downward (heels?)some of the wind gets lost off the sail in a self-depowering event (if that makes any sense). In the meantime the ama never looses its flotation ability and quickly allows the boat to recover.

The Island is just a very stable boat.

One circumstance can almost gurantee a flip over. An aka brace failure on the lee side while under sail. The aka brace is the little bar with plastic spring cap that holds the akas in the open position. If aka folds the ama into the hull - no flotation stability. Aka brace seems strong enough but one could damage it creating a failure.

Yakaholic


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 5:50 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 3:21 am
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Location: Clearwater, Fl
Thanks Yak, Looks like the chance of it happening is pretty slim considering how much you use yours. It's good to know the AI is so stable.

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Clearwater, Fl


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 6:14 pm 
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Location: Norman, OK
I see alot of talk about the leeward amas being buried. If they were a little bigger would it help?

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Hobie 14T, "Blazin" I guess I am keeping her!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 7:13 pm 
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Location: Virginia Beach, Va.
I see alot of talk about the leeward amas being buried. If they were a little bigger would it help? Probably not they knife through the water while still providing flotation. Bigger would just add drag both above and below the water.

I have come close to dumping on several occasions do to the rope wedging so tight in the cam cleat that it required several jerks to free it.

I have laid mine over to where the sail was only a couple feet from hitting the water and she will still sit right back up as soon as the line is freed. I do wish the cam was easier to release. Maybe a slightly larger cam?

gwiz


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 7:32 pm 
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Location: Florida
gwiz wrote:
I have come close to dumping on several occasions do to the rope wedging so tight in the cam cleat that it required several jerks to free it.

I have laid mine over to where the sail was only a couple feet from hitting the water and she will still sit right back up as soon as the line is freed. I do wish the cam was easier to release. Maybe a slightly larger cam?

gwiz


Wow that is remarkable and good to know. Never got that close for me.

When the wind really picks up I constantly find myself adjusting the sheet line wrapped around my right hand. I get primed and ready to have the right tension on line to be able to quickly release some line and de-power the sail.

Island lets you have quite a bit of excitement while still being very forgiving and stable if you make a mistake.

Owners wanting a little less adrenalin can reef in the sail a bit.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 8:11 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2007 11:46 am
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Location: sacramento
So whats the best way to take the larger wave..facing front?? cause I see what you mean with the bigger wakes...sitting happy riding along
then caught off gaurd..I do remember a post about quick rope tie off X
for the Aka, The spring clip has not loosed so far but can see how that could tip you if both happpen at once..Aka folding in.. larger wake under
sail.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2007 5:23 am 
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Location: Dahlgren, VA
Out in 20 knot winds with 2'+ breaking waves and the sail reefed halfway to the first batten. Suddenly the wind kicks up to 30 knots and just as I'm reaching for the furling line get hit with two 4' waves. The port ama was buried, the yak and right ama up in the air and the boat going over until I depowered the sail. The boat was heeled way past 45 degrees and it seemed to be the death grip on the rudder handle that kept me from sliding out. The AI dipped neatly into the trough and settled back just in time for the next big wave to wash over me. After that the sail was reefed just past the first batten and life was Hobie good again.

My preference is to find an angle to the waves that lets me roll with them and stay on top of them. A large wave with a period that fits the boat length will let you do this head-on. Otherwise, I'm driving the yellow submarine through an endless series of waves and a couple hours of that is a lot of hard (and now cold) work.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2007 7:45 am 
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Location: Rio Vista, CA
gwiz wrote:
[i]... I do wish the cam was easier to release. Maybe a slightly larger cam?

gwiz


My wife was having the same difficulty with her boat. She is a beautiful tall slender lady but does not have a lot of upper body strength. Not that I'm comparing you to my wife, Gwiz. I have no idea if you're beautiful or not. :lol:

I moved her main sheet cleat from the crossbar back to the flat spot on the hull just ahead of the mesh covered storage pocket. I added a wire fairlead and a wedge block under the cleat. She now has no trouble at all cleating and uncleating. Having the cleat so much closer gives her a lot more leverage on it.

We have also found an unintended benefit as well. Having the two cleats separated by about 16" the lines have less of a tendency to get tangled up. I have thought about doing the same thing to my boat. But I may want to use that spot for a future modification or addition.

When not yanking on them, I have found that my "Gwiz" spray shield is nice place to lay the lines to keep them clear and handy.

Sorry if I high-jacked this thread. Not really a post on capsizing other than to say that after many attempts I have never been able to capsize my AI. And I've flipped many catamarans. I know how it's done. :wink: When we first got our AI's I wanted to know if this could happen to my wife. That would cast a dark cloud on any future sailing for her. I can happily report that her AI has never scared her. She has never been afraid of going out in ANY conditions. And we have been out on the river when all other boats have long headed for safety.

The only reports of AI capsizing I have heard about have been accompanied by aka brace failures. Which reminds me, I have to order some spare parts.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2007 7:58 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:12 am
Posts: 433
Location: Florida
Rio Dan wrote:

The only reports of AI capsizing I have heard about have been accompanied by aka brace failures. Which reminds me, I have to order some spare parts.


I carry a spare aka brace assembly part #79523101 bungied inside the hull against the mast cup. Also, a couple of ropes just in case. If the plastic brace connector failied one would likely loose the entire brace after a capsize - hence the spare. At $35 it is good part to carry.

GREAT idea about cleat forward to get a better angle. My wife also enjoys her AI quite a bit and this mod would make it easier.
She is not thrilled about getting caught in higher wind and rough chop - calling it "being inside the washing machine". :lol:
She has learned to trust the stability of the Island and has gotten over her initial worry about tipping over - now fearlessly burying the ama at times.

Yakaholic


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 Post subject: never flipped
PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2007 11:46 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 2:55 am
Posts: 96
Location: North Shore Oahu Hawaii
here in hawaii we put these boats through the test. they do have small other problems but as far as flipping goes it has naver happend to me or my partner.. I was very close one day. I thinks its called a down wind reach. heading down and off the waves when a sudden gust hit just as the lee ama was buried and the right ama was high on a wave. the whole boat came way over the sail alomost touched the water but she poped right back up. i HOPE I NEVER FLIP MINE. being a good sailor and aware can be your saving grace. we ride our hobie AI's in 20 knot winds with 4-6 foot breaking waves. we mostly go down wind in this condition. forward the water looks smooth. sometimes when i look back i cant believe were out here. in smaller waves we will go upwind. they work great up wind but if the waves are to hi its a bumpy ride aloha Boogie-D Image Image :lol:

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2007 6:30 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:48 pm
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Location: Virginia Beach, Va.
I moved her main sheet cleat from the crossbar back to the flat spot on the hull just ahead of the mesh covered storage pocket. I added a wire fairlead and a wedge block under the cleat. She now has no trouble at all cleating and uncleating. Having the cleat so much closer gives her a lot more leverage on it.

That would make it easier but it would put a lot of stress on plastic, I might try the hunk of cutting board on the underside trick. It usually catches me when closehauled and suddenly the wind gusts around catching me broadside.

gwiz


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