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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 3:32 am 
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Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2007 6:08 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Melbourne
Hi from Melbourne - 'Down-Under'
I am new to this terrific forum and looking for some advice before the purchase of my first Hobie this summer.
I am considering a Adventureture Island - Could someone please comment on the following:
1)Assembly?
2)Sailing expertise?
3)Transportation to beach (approx 30 minutes drive) - Trailer (Rack and Roll looks like a terrific product, but very expensive to bring to Oz)?
4)Protection - Weather - Getting Drenched?
5)Transportation from trailer to beach - Can be done by one person, or two people required (as per Hobie manual)
6)Should I consider a Revolution, Adventure or Infaltable as my first sailing kayak?
7)Does someone close to Melbourne own an Adventure Island?)
Any other advice about my first purchase.
Best wishes to everyone in California with bushfire crisis. We had terrible bushfires in southern Australia last summer and our thoughts are with you all.
Best wishes
Andrew


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 6:15 am 
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Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:12 am
Posts: 419
Location: Florida
Hey Andrew.

I think all your questions have been covered a few times and in a few ways in previous posts. I have 2 Islands - one of them for my wife - niether of us had any sailing experince. We love the boat.

#1 - EZ & takes 10-15min - no tools.

#2 - None required EZ forgiving, stable boat. but Still thrilling enough for avid sailer.

#3 - I truck top 2 Islands - no problem.

#4 - A wet ride in chop and wind over 12mph - some extensive posts on dogers and spray shields here somewhere.

#5 - 1 Person - Use the Hobie trax cart with the big ballon wheels. Place hull on cart, assemble Island, roll to beach, launch, have fun!

#6 - All Hobies some some sail-ability. Island is the only true sailboat (trimaran) and is the fastest kayak when not using the amas/akas & sail.

#7 - don't know -

I can tell you this much the Island is like getting 3 boats in one. I am absolutely thrilled at how well it sails & kayaks - a real blast.

Image


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 6:38 am 
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Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2007 3:36 pm
Posts: 171
Location: Rockford, Illinois
#3 question....
I have a Rack and Roll trailer. For me it was worth the extra expense. I carry a Sport and a Revolution on it. I unhitch the trailer and take it by hand to the water with the kayaks on it. The 16" wheels make that possible. The break down for storage is great. Works for me.
Bruce

_________________
Everything before 60 is just a rehearsal!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 10:49 pm 
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Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Sun Jul 08, 2007 6:39 pm
Posts: 101
Location: Venice, Florida
HI Mate,

Get the Hobie AI. I bought mine in July and went sailing in the Gulf of Mexico the same day. I second what the others said. The closest thing to a problem I've had was raising/lowering the rudder--the dealer loosened a nut on the rudder assembly that was tightened too much at the factory and its worked great ever since.

I only live 10 minutes from the water so I've transported the AI in the back of my Trail Blazer with the stern supported with an Extend-a-Hitch (extends 53" behind car, leaving 3' hanging beyond the bar). Now that I've had time to check out trailers I've decided on the Rack and Roll.
Everything has to be stored in my garage since its not allowed to be stored outside in my neighborhood. The AI gets raised up to the ceiling with a Harken Lift, and the trailer disassembles and hangs on the wall. The cost of the R&R put me off for a while too, but everyone that has one is glad they spent the extra money--and it fits my needs like no other.

I'm very happy with my AI. Its a quality, high-end product like the R&R. So I hope you buy one and have as much fun as the rest of us.

So long mate,

_________________
Polecat
------------------
Hobie AI & WS Tempest 180 Pro
SW Gulf Coast: Sarasota to Keys

I'm not completely useless. I can always serve as a bad example.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2007 1:46 am 
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Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2007 6:08 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Melbourne
Many thanks to everyone for your kind assistance. I think AI is the way to go.
Just a couple more questions please, that I forgot last night:
I have read some reviews about leakage of hulls - has anyone had problems in this regard. I read a posting on reviews from Hobie about a 'fix' method for this, but I don't want to purchase a kayak that has leakage problems. Also, read some reports about seat straps not working properly.
Can the Hobie be paddled without sails - I know this defeats the purpose, but has anyone had experience with regard to this.
Weather will warm up shortly in southern Australia - need to get moving about purchase.
Best wishes to all
Andrew


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2007 7:18 am 
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Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:14 pm
Posts: 1886
Location: South Florida
Andrew,

I was out fishing using the AI hull only (no sail, no akas, amas) for about 5 hrs in 15 knot winds. I had about a pint (500 ml) of water in the hull at the end of the day. The AI hull has fairly tight hatch covers. During that day, I did not have any appreciable amount of water washing over the whole boat as you might have if you are sailing.

Where is the hull leakage coming from? The cam lock knobs for the mirage drive are water tight (cannot leak unless you have a hull failure at that site.) The most likely source of small water leaks are the various fittings in the stern. The 4 rudder line openings are about 1/8" (3 mm) in diameter. They are in the upper part of the hull, but waves probably wash over them regularly and leakage into the hull is inevitable. A typical sea kayak has these openings tightly sealed around the lines, but not the Hobie kayaks. I wonder if a bit of silicone caulking material forced into these holes would solve that problem? Of course, you would have to use caulking material which would not compromise the rudder lines.

Another possible seepage is at the attachment of the rudder to the hull. Again, sea kayaks fill the very tip of the stern with solid material and attach the rudders to that. Hobie does not do this when they mold the hull.

There are also the 2 shock cord fittings to hold the rudder. These may leak.

Finally, there is plug in the stern--make sure the screw-in plug is tight.

Keith


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