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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2011 11:37 pm 
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Hi,

I just bought a Pro Angler in Nanaimo, BC - and I'm not a fisherman.

I plan to use it for daily commuting from Protection Island to Nanaimo harbour - about a mile. Maybe I can transport my tuba on it. Of course, I may use it for fun as well -

I bought this boat because it seems stable and has a lot of storage room. Since it can carry a whopping 600 pounds, I'd like to add a passenger seat on the back.

Richard at Alberni Outpost suggested a canoe seat which mounts on a thick plastic plate which would be bolted onto the the back cargo holder.

He also suggested wedging a piece of Styrofoam within compartment, to carry the load onto the hull - but being careful not to bend out the hull.

If the seat faces backwards, the plate can be carved to clear the rear 8” Twist and Seal Hatch (patent pending) w/Gear Bucket.

I would prefer the rider be able to seat forward - and even help by paddling.

Will the back platform be able to carry 150-180 pounds? Will the boat remain stable?

What do you think about my idea?

Cheers,

AndrewJazzz


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 6:47 pm 
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If you are really just trying to do a basic commute, and not fishing or fun stuff, what attracted you to a PA? I would think that you could find more seaworthy 2-person "off the shelf stock" rides for half the price. A simple 12 ft aluminum deep V-hull traditional rowboat (with small outboard if necessary) comes to mind. You and a passenger could travel relatively safely, get your morning exercise, and arrive relatively dry. In my opinion, the PA is really a pretty specialized watercraft designed for fishing. Modifying it to do the work of a minivan by bolting on extra seating seems strange, so I probably don't understand your motivations/needs very well. It's a great stable "kayak", and definitely a cooler ride than more traditional craft, but I would not feel comfortable heading a mile out to sea with a 150-180 lb passenger anywhere onboard.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 6:58 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:37 pm
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Hey Andrew
I live not far from you and yes Richard sold us both our boats.
I think we both know, on a bad day, the 'Straights' and even Nanaimo Harbour can get really stinky...
The one thing that would be hard to beat on the PA is it's amazing stability and closed storage.
I own an AI and only use it for fun.
I'm sure the fact that where you use this boat is also one of the most prolific areas on the 'Island' for salmon has not been lost on you 8) .

If it came down to a choice between a PA or a 12 foot pile of recycled beer cans, hands down it will be the PA.

(So many people's thread I read here simply have Zero understanding of the local conditions here in the middle of December in a gale with the temps below freezing....)

Regards
Fred

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 7:17 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:37 pm
Posts: 543
Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Postscript...
Ever wonder what a 'small craft warning' is:
A 12 to 14 foot aluminum cartopper with a 10 to 15 horse outboard. The older boats had zero reserve flotation. These are aluminum coffins just waiting for a white cap to flip them turtle. The head of the motor raises the center of gravity to the point that even a sudden shift by a passenger can flip the boat and spilling it's contents into the sea.

THESE VESSELS ARE CHEAP AND INCREDIBLY DANGEROUS ON A MOVING OCEAN!
I intend to make the sale of these vessels illegal for use on any ocean in Canadian Waters as way too may dear souls have died as a result of their inferior design!!

Trinomite

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 5:28 am 
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I rigged up a simple camp seat with a few carabiners in the back for the kids to ride on....not sure what 150 lbs would do, but I've had no problems with my oldest son (50lbs - little more than the typical tuba) save for when he starts dragging his feet in the water. If you're really going to load things up and you're not looking to use the PA for fishing, rigging up some outriggers for additional stability would probably be prudent.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 6:24 pm 
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Okay, okay. I should not speak of what I do not know. I am not familiar with your area, and I have not spent any significant time in rowboats, so ignore my previous suggestions as ignorant of your situation. It was also rude of me not to welcome you to the forum. Mea culpa. But all that said, I have capsized my PA on several occasions in breaking surf on Lake Michigan and would NEVER recommend adding another seat for routine commuting purposes. Taking a child or lightweight passenger out for a shallow water sunset cruise on a calm evening would probably be fine, but crossing open water on the ocean in winter with 150 lbs sitting high above the rails? Take the ferry.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:24 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2011 11:16 pm
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Thanks to all who have replied.

I spent 24 hours with my PA - and I love so many things about it. But after pedaling it for several miles and docking it twice - and wheeling it to my place - I've decided that it is too big for me. More specifically to this point, the gate to the back yard of the cottage I rent is 36" wide and the PA is 38".

The ramp to the dock is about 42" wide and when I arrived at low tide, it was a real struggle to get it on the dock and wheel it up the ramp.

The Hobie dealer in Nanaimo, Richard, was great. He understood and I decided to go for the two-seater Oasis. It will carry 550 bounds - and with the front seat down, I can carry my tuba. As well, I can invite friends to kayak with me. It's less stable, but I got the little outrigger kit for when I have friends who might be uncomfortable with being in a kayak and for rough water.

Thus, I'll be moving over to the Oasis forum and start asking questions such as - Would it be a good idea to make a bulkhead between the front storage hatch and the first 8" hatch?

Cheers, everyone. May your Hobie keep you dry and safe.

AndrewJazzz


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