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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 10:29 am 
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If Trailex hasn't had a problem, then you can't argue with their 8" tires on their lightweight trailers. I'm sure they work fine, and I don't think people should be concerned about them, as Trailex seems to be a quality company that will take care of their customers.

I disagree, however, with the bounce situation, but haven't run an experiment. The theory that a small tire vs. a large tire is like a "basketball effect" doesn't make sense scientifically because the wheel isn't being bounced like a basketball, it's being rolled towards bumps. Roll a tennis ball towards a 2x4 and what happens? Now roll a basketball, now roll a large exercise ball. The rolling resistance of the larger ball, (to an extent) is also more helpful when going over bumps.

If Trailex is experiencing excessive bouncing with larger tires, there seems to be something else at play. I can't figure out what that is, but the larger tire, if properly inflated, should do a better job, not a worse job with trailers, even if they are lightweight.

SkiPro3 wrote:

...
3. The 12" tire will require you to back further down the ramp. On shallow ramps, it would probably cause the tow vehicle's rear tires to even go into the water. If you can lower the bunks on the trailer to make up for the taller profile tire, that might help.
...


This isn't a problem with lightweight boats like kayaks, Pro Anglers, or even my Bravo. I have submersible lights on my trailer, but almost never back them into the water. Driving up to the water's edge, or a bit into the water, is all that's necessary to get a lightweight boat off the trailer. These boats float in mere inches of water, you don't need the assistance of having the boat float, to get it off the trailer, you can simply slide it off the back end, and let it pivot towards the water. It works great.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 11:09 am 
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The 8-inch tires won't cause any "problem" but the idea that they reduce "bounce" or are somehow superior to larger trailer tires for this task is just pure bunk.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 11:39 am 
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I'm with Tom on this one...the idea that larger tires cause bounce...smells a bit fishy to me.

Iceflyer. :wink:

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 11:40 am 
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Tom Kirkman wrote:
The 8-inch tires won't cause any "problem" but the idea that they reduce "bounce" or are somehow superior to larger trailer tires for this task is just pure bunk.


Those are my feelings too.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 5:55 pm 
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I will be pulling my PA on the Trailex with PA Saddles from Atlanta, GA to Mobile, AL in a couple months. I plan to drive 70 mph when possible. Trailex assured me this shouldn't be an issue.

On the bounce issue I'm going with the guys that have built the trailers for 50 years. I'm leaving the 8 inch tires on the rig.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 8:32 pm 
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Have a good trip and show the pix! :D

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 6:45 am 
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It won't be an issue. People trailer all sort of things on small trailers with 8 inch wheels.

But the point myself and others were trying to make, is that larger wheels and tires do not induce "bounce." Trailex has several price points on their trailers. To achieve the desired level on the one you bought precludes using more expensive (larger) wheels and tires. That's why it has the 8 inch variety. It has nothing to do with "bounce."


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 8:22 am 
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Besides, you can decide after you've worn the rubber off those wheels. I'm just jealous because you "have" a trailer. :P

Cheers,
Iceflyer

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 12:30 pm 
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Trailex decals the tire pressure of 15 psi in "large red print".....this is for a tire, that if loaded to it's maximum load rating is 590 pounds at 50 psi.
Since the trailer and load is quite light, it makes sense the 4 x 8 tires are inflated to the lower number of 15 psi.
A softer/lower inflated pressurized tire will not bounce like a harder/higher inflated pressurized tire. :wink:

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:23 pm 
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Tom Kirkman wrote:
The 8-inch tires won't cause any "problem" but the idea that they reduce "bounce" or are somehow superior to larger trailer tires for this task is just pure bunk.
Tom, I'm not quite as convinced as you are. As you may know, the 8" wheel and tire weighs about 1/2 that of the 12" wheel and tire. Those who know suspension systems realize that the "unsprung weight", from a 12" wheel rolling or bouncing over a bump impacts the trailer chassis twice as much as the more humble 8" wheel, causing a bumpier ride and with greater inclination to lift the trailer airborne for longer period of time, This results in a harsher ride, and less traction for your trailer on curves and corners.

IMO, bearing and tread wear are more armchair issues than road issues. Bearing wear is not a practical problem with either size. given proper maintenance and appropriate loading. The higher tread wear of the smaller tire is more than offset by the lower replacement cost. Neither represents a significant cost over time. Honestly I think the biggest advantage of 12" wheels over 8" wheels (for towing kayaks) is their cooler look.

Each size has its pluses, but towed weight and macho appearance are the most appropriate deciding factors in wheel selection. Regardless of one's choice, I strongly suspect the trailer manufacturers may actually know what they're talking about! Just my opinion. :wink:


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2012 7:31 am 
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Would like to post some info about the SUT - 200 trailers, so that those that read this thread in the future, can make a better decision in regards to whether or not this unit is a good fit for them.

First let me say, this is probably the smallest, lightest weight trailer on the market made to carry a canoe or kayak. The load capacity is 200 lbs. It is just over 15 ft long and only 3 ft wide at the fenders.

It has a rubberized suspension...meaning there are 2 heavy duty rubber pieces wrapped around the axel. (1- top, 1- bottom…see attached pict) That and the suggested 15 PSI of tire pressure, helps to keep this particular light weight trailer on the ground. As you add more tire pressure to the 8” tires on this particular trailer…there will be an increase in the bounce factor.

Current owner of a SUT-200 trailex trailer…as I only have one Kayak and a small area to store it. This is a good fit for me. Gets parked/stored in the garage with no issues. Easy in/out of water. No issues with traveling to/from the lakes that I fish. Some up to 3 hrs away.

Now, if I were to purchase another PA in the future and then trailer 2, would be looking at something like the Triton trailer.

Just my opinion…

Pointing to rubberized suspension:
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Tires size don't look that bad (lol)
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2012 8:30 am 
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One note with the tires. The tire should be inflated to the MAX PSI listed on the side wall of the tire! This is where it needs to be regardless of load because this is where all the strength of the tire is and carries the load the best. Anything less and you open yourself to the tires possibly loosing the seal on the rim (blowout), bad tire wear (outside edges burn out faster), and damaging the rims. Even though you guys are not talking much weight here, it still is the shock factor of hitting potholes, railroad tracks and/or other road hazards you need to watch for.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2012 10:05 am 
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Trailex says:

Jbernier wrote:
I asked Trailex to comment on this post - here is their reply:


"We have been using the 8" wheel and tire combo since 1963! It works, why if you add 12" or larger combo's the light weight of the trailer and the boat at speed will bounce. It is like a basketball effect, I always tell our customers put the larger tires on and when it bounces uncontrollable at speed you will go back to 8" so don't throw them away.

I can't argue the fact that they look too small but when we get NO problems with them its hard to have a comeback."


Carl Carbon
National Sales & Marketing Manager
Trailex Inc.
1 Industrial Park Drive
Canfield, Ohio 44406
(Toll Free) (800) 282-5042
(Local) 330-533-6814
(Fax) 330-533-9118
(Email) trailex1@aol.com
(Web Site) http://www.trailex.com



Triton Trailers says:

tritontrailers wrote:
One note with the tires. The tire should be inflated to the MAX PSI listed on the side wall of the tire! This is where it needs to be regardless of load because this is where all the strength of the tire is and carries the load the best. Anything less and you open yourself to the tires possibly loosing the seal on the rim (blowout), bad tire wear (outside edges burn out faster), and damaging the rims. Even though you guys are not talking much weight here, it still is the shock factor of hitting potholes, railroad tracks and/or other road hazards you need to watch for.


And it's up to the customer to decide which answer makes the most sense. :)

I appreciate both companies taking a stand on this. It just shows that even companies with experience can have differing opinions.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2012 2:09 pm 
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I own a number of trailers. The smallest wheels on any of them are 12 inches. Some are as large as 20 inches. None of them "bounce." In fact, the larger the overall diameter of the wheel/tire combination, the smoother the ride.

Of course, I'm sure it's only a coincidence that the less expensive the trailer, the smaller the wheel/tire combination generally is.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2012 4:29 pm 
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Quote:
Tritontrailers wrote;
One note with the tires. The tire should be inflated to the MAX PSI listed on the side wall of the tire! This is where it needs to be regardless of load because this is where all the strength of the tire is and carries the load the best. Anything less and you open yourself to the tires possibly loosing the seal on the rim (blowout), bad tire wear (outside edges burn out faster), and damaging the rims. Even though you guys are not talking much weight here, it still is the shock factor of hitting potholes, railroad tracks and/or other road hazards you need to watch for.


That is not true. Tires are not designed to be inflated to their MAX PSI listed on the side wall for all uses. That MAX PSI is for the MAX LOAD, just like it says on the sidewall. If that were true, then go read the sidewall on the tires of your car, then read the tire pressure on the inside jam of the driver side door of your car. Which is right? The car manufacturer is right, that's who. How could any tire manufacturer know how that tire is going to be deployed? My pick up truck has the tires with a max PSI of 50 and the truck manufacture says 32 psi. I tried 'em at 50. It was like rocks. No give and the harshest ride ever. The contact patch resulted in very easy traction release (spin tires) At 32 they were tolerable and I had much better traction.


Last edited by SkiPro3 on Fri Apr 27, 2012 9:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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