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 Post subject: New to Hobie
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 9:43 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 9:27 pm
Posts: 4
Years ago, I sailed a Tanzer 22, but it was gone before my kids came along. Since, I moved on to an amphibious plane (could never get completely away from the water) and recently, when explaining to the kids the science of how a sail on a boat is like a wing from our plane, placed vertically, I was surprised by their keen interest to sail. And as suddenly, we have an opportunity to get our hands on a Hobie 14. It seemed to me that would be a good craft to teach them to sail on. The downside is, I'm a lot heavier now than I was in the days of the Tanzer, and the kids are getting bigger too. I weight 230 and my 9 year old daughter is 100, my 7 year old son 60. Is a 14 too small for us? It's a basic rig with no jib, but I'm assured in pretty decent condition. I haven't examined it close enough yet (will see it Saturday) to get the serial number, but the sail is 14994 if that means anything. And it's powder blue on white, with five battons. Any guesses on age?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2005 6:15 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:43 am
Posts: 779
Location: St. Louis, MO
What kind of plane do you have? Just curious. WhenI was in school I was spending most of my money on flying and it was going way too fast. So, I bought a Hobie 16 and taught myself to sail as a cost savings measure.

I also have a "heavy wind stature" and found the H16 to be a great bot to learn on. For pleasure sialing I routinly had about 600 lbs on it. You don't fly a hull or go very fast, but you can at least get three people out on the water. Also the extra room on the H16 vs the H14 is nice. The H16's are a very simple rig and a very robust boat. They are also everywhere and you can find them for very a reasonable price.

The best person to have respond is JamieZX. He is teaching his wife to sail on an H14 and he ownes an H16.

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Nick

Current Boat
In the market
Previous boats owned
'74 Pearson 30
'84 H16
'82 H18 Magnum
St. Louis, MO


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 Post subject: 14 or 16
PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2005 9:09 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 8:54 pm
Posts: 37
Location: Orange County, CA
I am presently teaching my wife to sail on a 16 as well as JamieZX, though my 14 experience is limited to college (a LONG time ago :!: ). Our weight tops out at +- 300lbs and we find the typical late morning and early afternoon wind outside of the Marina Del Rey harbor (about 10-15kn on a good day) to be perfect for learning and having fun.

Based on your stated maximum combined crew weight and the fact that you're teaching the kids, I think a 16 would be a better choice (I'm a US Sailing Level I instructor, so I have a sort-of informed opinion). It's got the jib and main sailplan which will be much more common on dinghies or other boats they might sail, it's faster with more people on it, keeping things educational and fun at the same time, it's got a better racing/support class (if that's even a remote future possibility) and there seems to be lots more learning liturature on the 16s (probably as a result of the class structure) than on the 14s.

Downsides are that it can be difficult for a kid(s) to right after it goes over, and kids love to tip them over, and they can be heavy for kids to put in and take out of the water.

These comments disregard cost, your sailing environment, etc, and the fact that you have access to a 14 right now, and, all things considered, the 14 might be a place to start with a 16 down the road at some time. My two cents, anyway. Good Luck with whatever you choose to do :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:09 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2005 2:15 pm
Posts: 1088
Location: Oakland, CA
Do you expect the kids to sail the boat without you? If so, then get the 14. If you will be on the boat with the kids, then, considering your weight, get the 16. Keep in mind that a catamaran is a powerful boat and is best sailed with enough weight or backup boats to right it. Also, a 14 without a jib can be difficult to tack since back-winding a jib helps push the bows out of the wind.

Also, before taking the $/time plunge, how about taking the kids out for a test ride with a local Hobie Fleet and test their interest?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 8:11 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 9:57 am
Posts: 1604
Location: Clear Lake Iowa
I think the 14 is tough to right, because every 14 I have owned (6 of them) turtles right away. My kids are 15 and 14 and they have no trouble getting their 16 back up quickly. The 14 is another story. Get the 16.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 12:55 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 5:39 pm
Posts: 433
Location: West Texas
Run an empty gallon jug up the mast with the head of the sail. The boat will not turtle then. Otherwise, have fun!

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Jim

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 7:13 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2005 4:43 pm
Posts: 108
Location: Tulsa Oklahoma
great idea from Jamie inthedesert. Get the 16 more parts, more everything. When you get the basics down do some club races and get the kids involved. I believe the 16 will be better for all. I learned on a 16 and then jumped up to a 20. 16's are a great boat and the jib takes away several of the problems with the 14. ditto just my 2 cents worth 8)

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Tom & Nancy Page H20 803


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 8:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 5:39 pm
Posts: 433
Location: West Texas
Personally I like my H16 better than my H14. But it's also been in the family for 33 years now and I have much more experience on it. OTOH the H14 is much easier to right single-handed so I think it'll wind up being a more convenient boat for solo sailing. Gotta get a dolphin striker and trap wires for it. :sigh:

:)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 2:50 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 9:27 pm
Posts: 4
Thanks to everyone for your thoughts and guidance. Much appreciated. After looking around a bit, I found my options were pretty much limited to the 14'. We live in northern Ontario, at the intersection of Lake Superior, Michigan and Huron. Though there are many superb opportunities of excellant sailing here, there are no boats. The 14 was all I could find without treking far afield, and I didn't have time for that.

But, I took the advice and took the kids to see the boat and go for a ride. They were thrilled beyond my expectations. They wouldn't stop talking about it and insisted we get the boat. We've used it a great deal since getting it and I have no regrets at all about getting it.

Sure, there would be great advantages to a 16' given my height and weight, but the 14' is roomy enough and bouyant enough to support the three of us. I even had me and three kids on it, and it was great. And it will be perfect for these guys, who are only 7 and 9, to manage on their own next year after enough practice with me.

Though big water is within reach, we live on the St. Mary's River (connecting Superior, Michigan and Huron) and it's pretty sheltered, making it great for seaplane operations but lousy for good sailing. The winds are pretty light and variable, competing with a strong river current; but I swear the Cat is incredibly responsive and scoots on the lightest breaze. It opens up all kinds of opportunities for sailing which simply would not exist with a monohull.

Yes, I miss the jib, and tacking is a challenge. But this is a good challenge for the kids to work with and develope skills to move on with.

Someone above asked what we fly. It's a Lake LA4-200, a perfect amphibious plane for getting in and out of metro cities' airports from our remote corner, and still be able to sneak into a remote lake for swimming or fishing on our way home from work. Despite the opportunities and thrills with flying, the kids would now rather sail!

Thanks again for all your excellant advice and guidance. We'll be monitoring the forums and learning from them.


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