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 Post subject: Taking your pet sailing!
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2003 10:58 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2003 5:52 am
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Location: Underwater in Mid-Michigan
And I don't mean your "significant other"! :D
Have you ever taken your dog/cat/parrokeet sailing with you? How'd it work out? Do you use a pet life jacket?

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 05, 2003 7:18 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2003 7:02 am
Posts: 18
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Sorry haven't taken the dogs sailing yet, but I was thinking that a pet life jacket would be mandatory. Mostly if the pet leaves the boat while under way, it will take some time to come-about for a pickup - secondly if the boat capsizes (as catamaran will do) and the dog decides swiming to shore is better than swiming around the fools who put him in the water, it will one less thing to worry about- let the dog strikeout toward shore and pick him up when you can. Dogs don't have a good sense about how far shore is so at least if they get tired of swimming they can float.
Also the life jackets have grab-handles - so you can pluck the animal out of the water like a wet gunny-sack.

I will be interested to read posts about animals on catamarans. I have two dogs (40+ lbs range). I think I will work them one at a time on the boat until I get a feel for how they behave.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2003 7:03 am 
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Anyone know of a supplier of Pet Life Jackets for my Goldfish, so I can take them sailing too!!
:lol:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2003 5:52 am 
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Location: Mid-Atlantic
No - fish, waterfowl, seals and sea otters, are exempt from the life jacket recommendation. I suppose you could extend the exemption to the comedians as well.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:04 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2003 7:39 am
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Location: Raleigh NC
I've tried taking one of my golden retreivers sailing before, and it didn't work out to well. She has this thing for eating jellyfish, I think she thinks they are floating tennis balls. At any rate, if she's looking overboard and sees one, she jumps off and swims for it.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2003 5:08 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2003 6:23 am
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I have had some great experiences sailing with my dog. They make great companions when your alone. There are some precaution that I usually take when I'm out with Dakota (retriever husky mix).

1. He tends to like to walk around and get on the bows of the hulls. Its a lot of fun for him but can cause major problems if he gets caught in the lines. Because of that...I usually don't go out when the wind is blowing hard. If I have to sheet out really quickly and his leg is in the mainsheet...in the drink we go.

2. Life jackets work great if you plan on falling in the water...but they don't last long. Because of the dogs weight with all the water in the fur...the handles rip right out after a while. If you do get one...get the best quality you can find. Make sure the stiches for the handle are really sewn in and reinforce them if you have your own sewing machine. I use a full chested harness that goes around his neck, down his back, and behind his front legs. They are really durable and provide a great handle for getting your dog back on the boat.

3. Having your dog know some basic commands really well is very important.(sit, come here, up, and of coarse...NO!)

4. And the most important rule of all...have as much fun as possible.

Fair winds and safe sailing for you and your pet.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2003 1:38 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2003 11:22 am
Posts: 26
Location: New Jersey
Our dog, Shelby, is a German Shorthaired Pointer. Wacky as they come. I don't think it would be a good idea for her to come on the cat :lol: .

Wish there was an easy way to post pictures on the site. I'd love to see pictures of your pets out for a sail!

Regards,

Joe

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 Post subject: Two dogs sailings....
PostPosted: Sun Aug 03, 2003 7:57 am 
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Location: Mid-Atlantic
I took both of my dogs sailing last week on my Getaway - it was a great time, they took to sailing almost immediately. One dog is a mix Austrailan Cattle Dog - Sydney, the other a mix short-hair collie and/or greyhound - Gandalf.

Sydney- is crazy about the water ie: no fear - Gandalf just now is becoming confident enough to swim on his own. These two dogs are polar opposites in personality.

I did purchase life jackets for them "Outward Hound" brand from Petco -no affiliatiation- The handles on the jackets were helpful - the product is well made and the dogs didn't seem to mind wearing the jackets for extended periods of time.

The first sail was a just a light breezy day - good sailing weather for a leisurely trip. Sydney wandered around the bows and in about 10 minutes fell into the water. I put the boat into the wind and she swam over and I lifted her in by the handle on the jacket.

Gandalf was content to ride on the rear tramp- laying down- he immediately lays down in the car too - not very active when riding.
(Remember polar opposite of Sydney)

We wore the dogs out playing on a sandbar and on the return trip they both slept most of the way back to camp (about 45 minutes) .

Day two the ACD did the same thing I put the boat into the winds she swam past the bow and between the hulls, I missed her as she went under the traveler bar and she immediately turned and followed the boat. Basically she came up to the rudder and I helped her climb over the stern.
That was the last time she fell out. Although she seemed to enjoy standing on the very tip/bow of the hull - so falling out was still a potential.
We sailed the rest of the week with no incidents.

Before the week was over they were jumping on board as the boat was being readied to leave the 'beach". They both took to riding on the front tramp laying down or sleeping - it was funny watching Gandalf figure out that he could even step on the front tramp - seeing the water below was unnerving until my son coaxed him on the tramp. One day the weather was pretty heavy and Sydney made a game of biting the water splashing through the rear tramp. This turned out to be a pretty entertaining game and kept her out of trouble - she is a working dog, so I am pretty certain she felt it was a wothwhile endeavor. If you have ever been around an ACD for any length of time you know what I mean. They have two speeds all the way on, or off - they are either busy - or sleeping - usually busy.

All in all they are great sailors and I know they will be participating with us on the boat frequently. Just need to find a trapeze harness for Sydney - I think she would enjoy it....;-)

Chuck


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2004 2:20 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 12:29 am
Posts: 16
Location: Norway
I have a Newfi (Newfoundland) 62Kg/140lbs. Newfoundlands are water dogs, they have webbed feet, adore the water and are used for water rescue work (both people and equipment)... On a boat I ALWAYS put a life jacket on the little fella.

Life jackets are essential for dogs. It is very difficult to bring a dog back on board without a life jacket. Practice on shore and modify the life jacket until you are confident that you can get them back on board (or even on board a vessel with more freeboard, in case of deep trouble).

Another consideration is, that when dogs are swimming it is VERY difficult for them to see the shore, especially in waves, (as their eyes are so low to the water) this means that the dog will swim around and may not necessarily swim to the shore as he may not have any idea which way it is.

Also with a life jacket on they are easier to see, both by you and by well wishing 'helpers' who could be looking at you and then not notice the small head in the water until they have run over it, to come to your 'assistance'.

On my dogs bouyancy aid, I've sewed on reflective strips, as if he does get lost these really help in low light conditions.

Oh and how does he go on the boat... he doesn't he'd much rather be in the water, and in amongst moorings this is not normally the best approach :D :D

Lastly practise man/dog overboard procedures. I went cruising on a friends 36" boat and asked him when was the last time he did a MOB practise, he laughed and said he didn't need to practise. Shortly after I threw one of his very large fenders over the side. Within three minutes we'd lost site of it (this was in a good day to take a Hobie out, twin wiring, but not over powered). It took us 48 minutes to locate the fender and get it back on board... had that been a person or a dog, from a smaller platform (a Hobie) they would have been a lot harder to see... Practice a couple of times minimum per season on this... it really could save a life...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2004 10:52 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2004 1:26 pm
Posts: 127
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
What's that old saying "getting along like cats and dogs"?

Yes, MOB's are great drills. Every time a beverage container goes overboard, I do one. Of course it's much easier to pick up a bottle than haul a friend back on board. The key is to round up and head into the wind just downwind of the friend in need. That way, you won't keelhaul them, blaze past, or dislocate any joints. It's rather difficult to get someone back on a cat in water deeper than their waist. It takes a lot of upper-body strength, especially if you're hauling a 140 pound, wet newfi!

True story: Last summer, I almost had a knock-down on my sloop due to a really strong, rogue gust. In the process of not tipping over, or losing any crew, I lost a fender. By the time I was safely able to sail back to the fender, some damn power boater had snagged it. However, I did find my hat. By the way, the bartender didn't spill a drop as he was making mojitos in the galley. No, the mojitos weren't a factor in the near knock-down.


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