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 Post subject: Two 16's on One trailer
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 7:06 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 8:45 am
Posts: 759
Location: Clinton Lake Lawrence, KS
We have added a second H16 to the "collection", aquired without a trailer.

We could build up a trailer for it alone, but when we travel to races we'll want both boats on a single trailer. My thoughts are why not make a trailer that suits both purposes, for day sailing at the local lake, when only one family member goes out to sail one boat. A set up where the bottom boat could be launched off a boat ramp and leave the one on top. We have one trailer that was modified for a catamaran and its load carrying capacity is not an issue.

Does anyone have ideas or have you seen a (for lack of better term) permanent two boat trailer? Is there one manufactured we could copy?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 8:26 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:43 am
Posts: 779
Location: St. Louis, MO
I haven't seen one, but what comes to mind might be possible.

Start with a regular boat trailer as most cat trailers do. Instead of adding cross bars that are just wider than the boat (wide enough to accommodate the rollers/cradles) make them wide enough to accommodate the width of the boat plus a vertical pylon on both sides. Then, add a second set of crossbars to the vertical pylons. I would probably add some logitudinal stringers to the top level for stability. Maybe even an extra pylon or two to the front trailer cross bar (This depends on how far forward the bottom boat sits on the trailer.)

Basically, you are creating a big box on top of a regular boat trailer. One boat will sit "in" the box and the other on the box.

Some concerns to be considered.

1) the lower trailer cross bars are strong enough to support the weight of two boats and the extra structure. Remember the weight will be applied at teh very ends of the lower crossbeams.

2) that you have enough access to the lower boat so you can ramp launch it.

If what I described isn't clear, please let me know and I will try to provide a sketch.

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Nick

Current Boat
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Previous boats owned
'74 Pearson 30
'84 H16
'82 H18 Magnum
St. Louis, MO


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 11:06 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2003 1:15 pm
Posts: 168
Nick/John,

The box thing is a good idea, but you don't need to have the box out on the ends of the front beam (crossbar). You can make two support beams on the inside of the hulls to support an upper beam. this would make the box even stronger. You really only need the back crossbar beams to be wide enough for the boat to pass through.

I think the maximum legal width is 8.5 feet??

It would also be easier to get cradles that pivot on the back so that they will be at a good angle when trying to loat the top boat. Of course, rollers work. I would get really wide rollers so you son't be limited to one specific boat on top. I have my single trailer set up so that any 14-20 foot boat will fit on it. I plan on making a box like Nick suggested and I'll use big rollers on top..

Don't forget that if you are double stacking, you have to figure out what to do with the masts. Typically, when I double stack, the masts go on after the top boat is tied down and they go between the boats.

Dan


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2005 2:28 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2005 9:47 pm
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Location: San Diego
You don't need any additional structure other than a double mast crutch at the front of the trailer. In the past we traveled to many regattas with stacked H-16s.

First, step your mast and tie the boat and mast down as ususal. Then a couple of 2x4s nailed together, with carpet for padding, cross the trampoline near the front and rear crossbars of the bottom boat. Add bumps to the outside of the wooden cross bars to prevent side to side drift. You will need to build the front stack up on each side to allow the wooden crossbars to clear the trampoline hump near the front cross bars. Add a mast crutch to the rear wooden cross bar.

Step the mast on the second boat. Remove the mast by detaching the wires at the mast tang, stack the boat on the top of the first boat after you have tied down the second boat's mast. Tie the top boat down and off you go.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2005 4:46 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2005 2:15 pm
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Location: Oakland, CA
Hammond's description of stacking 16's is shown in a photo in Phil Berman's book, "Catamaran Sailing From Start To Finish", on p. 199. I can't say from experience it works, but the photo supports Hammond's simpler method. If you're concerned about the weight pressure on the bottom boat's hulls, then consider adding another roller to each point of contact.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2005 6:32 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2003 7:11 pm
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Location: Detroit, MI
The best of both worlds - a double-stack trailer w/ a double stack on top:
Image

Notice that the top two boats are stacked on themselves w/the 2x4 method.


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