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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:45 am 
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Location: Low Country - SC
My Hobie's sails shackles are all the screw-in type, which takes a bit of time to handle each time we install or remove the sails. I am planning to buy a spare set of shackles for each various type on the boat and this got me thinking as to whether or not the spring-loaded or quick release could be safely used? I have used them on mono-hulls, but does the speed and capsizing prone aspects of the Hobie make them vulnerable?

I understand that the shackles must have a proper load rating regardless of the type. I am aware that even the screw in pins can vibrate out and nothing is bullet proof short of using safety wire and rigging tape on everything.

If I can shave 5-minutes on the front end and back end of rigging the boat each weekend it would be worth the incremental cost of the quick-release hardware "only" if those five minutes do not increase the chances of not losing a shackle at an inopportune moment.

Any experience that can be shared related to hardware design would be appreciated. Thank you.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 11:06 am 
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Location: St. Louis, MO
I use screw-in shackles only on the mast tang on my boat and on the halyard. I use ring-dings on all of the shroud and forestay attachements that are within reach when the mast is stepped. I use the ball lock on my main clew and and to attach my boom gooseneck. I use a carribeaner to attach my jibsheet to the jib clew.

The largest concern with the ball lock pins is if the hole they get pushed through enlarges too much they will not be able to keep themselves in the hole properly. Since the ball is usually hardened material it can wear away at the softer material of the hole. But, regular inspection of any holes where these pins are inserted will catch any excessive wear.

I hope this all made sense. As with every other wearable part of the boat, peform inspections regularly and you will be fine.

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 Post subject: Shackles
PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 5:14 pm 
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I think halyard shackles and the Jib clew shackle can be replaced with quick release without concern for safety. As Hobie Nick wrote... I wouldn't use any quick release stuff on the standing rigging.

Once your boat is tuned you can pretty much tape over all of the pins and rings except for the forestay pin. There are lots of ways to save rigging time. Most of tyhe time savers relate to how you stow the wires when trailering. I double them over and pass through the tramp laces. I tie the loop ends off if traveling far.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2006 12:30 am 
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Location: San Diego
Which model Hobie do you have. Each has different quick release/quick rig tricks. Most of these optional rigging procedures do not cause issues, safety or otherwise, but it helps to know which boat you are trying to rig fast.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2006 6:40 am 
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I had an H16 for about 7 years then I got an H18 and have had that for about 3 years now. I haven't sailed the H18 as much so it takes me a little longer to set it up for now.

I was able to get my H16 from trailer to sailing in less than 20 minutes. I did it all solo. The largest variable was finding a place to park the car and trailer while I was sailing.

With two people who know how to rig an H16 I would say about 15 minutes max.

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Nick

Current Boat
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'74 Pearson 30
'84 H16
'82 H18 Magnum
St. Louis, MO


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2006 2:42 pm 
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Location: Low Country - SC
My boat is an FX one in which I am looking at hardware options for the running rigging (not the standing rigging).


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2006 10:09 am 
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Check the load rating for your current hardware and find "quick-release" hardware with the same load rating. As I mentioned previously, caribeaners are nice for attaching blocks to the jib sail (if you have a jib). Ball lock pins are nice for replacing regular straignt pins. Snap shackles are nice for attaching blocks to the boom and the main traveler.

The key is to use hardware which meets or exceeds your current hardware's load rating.

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Nick

Current Boat
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Previous boats owned
'74 Pearson 30
'84 H16
'82 H18 Magnum
St. Louis, MO


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2006 9:34 am 
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Location: San Diego
OK,

The Hobie 18 probably will take a little longer to rig than a Hobie 16 even with quick release because there are a couple of rigging steps the 16 does not have i.e. the zipper luff and the main sail ring, loose footed sail, and the method of tightnening the rig. That said here is what I would do make rigging go quicker.

Matt Miller is correct, wire securing by feeding through the lacing or pulling forward to the mast crutch will save time over trying to coil and secure the standing rigging.

Once you step the mast, I would have two quick pins, one on each bridle instead of the one at the roller furling device. This is always a three handed job and having the crew or the on the spot helper find your prefered hole is difficult at best. Quick pins here on the standing rigging is ok because the pins would have to fall up to fall out. I have the ball type pins on my Hobie 20 and they work great. Dont forget to remove the step pin.

Hoisting the main, you can drill out the twist shackle here and use another push pin/ball pin here. A good luff rope guide can save you time feeding in the sail. If you ever have to replace the bolt rope on your main, have the sailmaker use teflon tape. It makes a world of difference.

Now that the main is up, quick pin the gooseneck on the boom through the vertical pin on the mast. Again, no problem because the pin would have to fall up. Do not use the pin on the horizontal as it may interfere with the gooseneck joint. Use a quick bell shackle to attach the clew to the boom. Leave this on the sail when you de-rig. This saves you feeding the shackle through the sail. Quick release the mainsheet to the traveler. Use a snap shackle here. The snap shackle will stay attached to the mainsheet with either a standard pin or a bolt with a nylock nut.

Hook up the downhaul with either a quick shackle or a pair of hooks like the Hobie Tiger's use. I don't know what downhaul system you use so you will have to make a choice here.

Pull the mainsheet to the side an tighten your rig. Sorry, the shrould pin will have to be a standard pin with split rings. Alway use covers (boots) here to keep fingers and toes away from hardware and to keep the rings and pins from accidently being pulled out. Rigging tape on the lowest pin and ring is not a bad idea. Use the same rigging tape to protect your sail at the speader ends of your diamond wires.

Quick pin the bell shackle to the tack of the jib. If you can not pass the pin through the hole after the rig is tight, you have the fixed pin in the wrong hole. This is another reason to quick pin the bridle wires and not the forestay. Your assistant can't put the pin in the wrong hole.

Make sure the roller has all the line on it before you hoist the jib. Once you feed the jib halyard through the zipper luff, tie the tail end of the halyard to the zipper car. Hoist the sail fully and use the tail end of the halyard to zip the now fully hoisted sail. This is quicker than the pull zip pull zip that most people use. Secure the luff tension and hook the jib sheets to the clew with whatever quick device you pick here. Make sure this device is not prone to hooking on to the diamond wires or shock cord, or the downhaul. I would use a standard shackle here to avoid this on the water snafu.

Quick pin the tiller extention to the crossbar and snap on the boards' shock cords on and you are ready to go.

I hope some of this helps.


PS- There is snow in our local mountains today. I am taking the kids up to go for snow play. In San Diego, we drive an hour to find snow. Then we come home to go sailing in the fridged 70 degree winter weather. This is really getting tough. I had to put on a windbreaker the other day while sailing. :)


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