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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:21 am 
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I have a really quick question in between studying for tests this week (Yes Dad, I'm studying!)- Is there a good way to dry out my hulls? I forgot my drain plugs a few months back and now I'm terrified that there is still a little puddle of water sitting in the middle of my hulls. I've backed the boat down the ramp and tilted it as far as possible by myself but I still think there is a little left.

I know in Sunfish sailboats, the foam gets wet and over time becomes saturated with water, thus adding to the boat's weight. Does my Hobie 16 have foam blocks like that? With my Sunfish I added an inspection port and put a fan and a heat lamp in there for a month and it was bone dry.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 10:49 am 
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There is a foam block in there but its loose and only prevents the boat from sinking in a catastrophic failure. Just open any ports you have and remove the drain plug. One warm day will dry out your hulls. The foam block wont act like a sponge like on your sunfish.

If you want to tweak on it, raise the bows and use a sponge to get the water out via the drain plug.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 1:47 pm 
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I learned this trick with my power boat. You just cut an old rag into 2 long/narrow strips. (maybe an inch wide by 12 inches long), and stuff that as far as you can into the open drain hole of each hull. I use a long screwdriver to really shove it as far as it can go, leaving the last few inches hanging out the back. Of course, tilt the boat so all the water runs towards the stern.

It acts like a wick and sucks any standing water out of the hull. It may take a few days depending on how much is in there, but works amazingly well. When the rag dries up, you know it's done the job.

Another trick I learned to dry the waterlogged foam is tape some black yard bags on top of the hulls, and open the ports. The bags heat up in the sun and that causes the damp air to flow up an out. You can actually feel the air moving out the open ports on a sunny day.
Of course, this can take a long time (many weeks), but it does work, and you don't have to use any electricity.


Last edited by flaco on Wed Oct 12, 2011 1:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 1:52 pm 
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PurdueZach wrote:
I have a really quick question in between studying for tests this week (Yes Dad, I'm studying!)- Is there a good way to dry out my hulls? I forgot my drain plugs a few months back and now I'm terrified that there is still a little puddle of water sitting in the middle of my hulls. I've backed the boat down the ramp and tilted it as far as possible by myself but I still think there is a little left.

I know in Sunfish sailboats, the foam gets wet and over time becomes saturated with water, thus adding to the boat's weight. Does my Hobie 16 have foam blocks like that? With my Sunfish I added an inspection port and put a fan and a heat lamp in there for a month and it was bone dry.


You could also consider adding inspection ports to the decks of your H16 like you did on the Sunfish - that way it's way easier to dry out. It also makes it nice to have some storage for taking lunch and drinks out on the water with ya (by using some hatch storage bags) All these items can be found in the Hobie Cat sailboat parts and accessories catalog and ordered from any Hobie Cat Dealer - call toll free 1800hobie49 - or click the dealer finder link above on this page: http://www.hobiecat.com/support/dealers/search/ )


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 4:06 pm 
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Location: Knoxville, TN
Quote:
You just cut an old rag into 2 long/narrow strips. (maybe an inch wide by 12 inches long), and stuff that as far as you can into the open drain hole of each hull. I use a long screwdriver to really shove it as far as it can go, leaving the last few inches hanging out the back. Of course, tilt the boat so all the water runs towards the stern.


That's a good idea. Taking it a step further, you could tie one end of a long piece of fishing line to the rag and push it farther into the hull, with a coat hanger or something longer if needed, and then pull the rag back out with the line. Just a thought.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 3:39 am 
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IMO, the only way to really dry out the hulls is to install an inspection port as mentioned above. You need airflow through the hull to get it to dry and you're not going to get sufficient airflow through the small opening of the drain plug. Once you have the port installed, you just leave it open on a dry, sunny day. Once it's dried out you close it back up and you're good to go. You can even stick a small fan and/or a light bulb in the opening for a little while to help dry the boat out even further.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 4:47 am 
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Location: Columbus, Indiana
Where should an inspection port be installed for a 16,forward of the tramp frame or aft of the frame?
Bill 404 21SE and H16

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 5:57 am 
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Pretty much anywhere behind the front pylon I believe is considered an acceptable spot (although probably good to stay clear of the shroud anchor area).
Cutting a hole for the port reduces the strength of the deck, so placing the port forward of the front pylon is not a good idea since that's the most highly loaded area of the hull. Use a 4" diameter port if you're just looking to vent the hull. Use a 5" port if you actually want access to the inside of the hull (and keep in mind that there's a large foam block between the pylons).

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 6:07 am 
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Thanks SRM,
That where I thought would be the best place.That area is not very accessible for my jig saw unless I take my boat apart. :( Looks like a winter project.
Bill 404 21SE and H16

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 7:04 am 
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Location: Lake Champlain, Vermont
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Another trick I learned to dry the waterlogged foam is tape some black yard bags on top of the hulls, and open the ports. The bags heat up in the sun and that causes the damp air to flow up an out. You can actually feel the air moving out the open ports on a sunny day.


Flaco, great idea, I need to dry out a sunfish this winter. I take it I need to raise the black tarp somewhat around the port holes to let the air out? (as opposed to cutting holes in the tarp to let rain back in!) I'd like to let it sit all winter.

Thanks,

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Last edited by divimon2000 on Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:45 am 
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Location: Clinton, Mississippi
I am generally opposed to cutting holes in otherwise solid hulls. That said, if I had a port, here's what I'd do for a dryer hull during storage. Make a vent elbow (that just fits in the port hole) out of a short setion of PVC pipe/fittings, flanged if needed to keep rain out. Some screen taped over the open end of the pipe will keep insects out as well. Seen it done, and it works well.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 7:21 pm 
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Go to the Hobie FAQ section and the note on winterizing. The PVC vents shown are mine. When the boat is on the beach these are screwed in to vent and dry the hulls. When I go sailing they are replaced with a flat port lid.

I guess what I am saying is these work to keep a boat dry, even in the rain & snow.

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