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PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:26 am 
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Just wondering what is the on adverage fastest cataraman make/size that you can trailer. Not counting trifoiler (even tho it's not a cata) or the flying phantom. I am not concerned about racing rules or anything like that.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 3:25 pm 
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According to US sailing's handicap chart the Marstrom 20 carbon spi is the fastest small cat. Hobie's fastest cat is the Fox according to the same chart. The fastest cat made by Hobie in US production has got to be the wildcat.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 5:13 pm 
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the wild cat is Europe, currently made by usa the 16 would be the fastest

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 6:12 pm 
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I would imagine that the formula 40s or AC 45s can be disassembled and transported with a semi trailer, does that make them "trailerable". C Class cats are also "trailerable" and would blow any beach cat out of the water. The Vestas sailrocket is a multi hull and is the fastest sailboat on the planet. I'm sure it was transported to the water using a trailer. Not really sure what you're looking for here. Most catamarans, by virtue of their design, can be disassembled and put on a trailer.

If you're looking for the fastest production trailerable beach cat, I would say its most likely one of the high tech 18 or 20 footers like the F18s, A Class, Nacra 20, Nacra 6.0, Hobie 20, or Tornado. On any given day, the fastest one would depend on weather conditions, the course, and who's at the helm.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 7:08 pm 
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Like towing it with your truck without major disassemble. I think the question has been answered with the manstrom 20. That water rocket boat is amazing. They need to make a smaller kit version for us!


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:36 pm 
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We sailed against a couple Vipers. Owners said it took an hour or so to rig and same to unrig. Not sure how typical that is but there's things like that to consider too.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 9:32 am 
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jonh wrote:
We sailed against a couple Vipers. Owners said it took an hour or so to rig and same to unrig. Not sure how typical that is but there's things like that to consider too.


Interesting.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 9:48 am 
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While not a catamaran, the Motive Trimarans, both the 15 and 25 foot length models, are trailerable and do not appear to be very difficult to set up. Appears that they were designed for ease and quickness of set up. The 15 looks like it would be a snap and could be pulled by a small compact car.

No idea how fast either will go, although I suspect the 25 footer could be quite fast, at least judging by the amount of sail it carries.

http://www.motivetrimarans.com/


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 22, 2013 7:30 pm 
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tbox wrote:
jonh wrote:
We sailed against a couple Vipers. Owners said it took an hour or so to rig and same to unrig. Not sure how typical that is but there's things like that to consider too.


Interesting.

Try an F-18 . . . With practice, you can get from trailer to the water in 90 minutes. First time I put my Tiger together, it took well over two hours - and it didn't have nearly the number of controls most Wild Cats have.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:30 pm 
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MBounds wrote:
Try an F-18 . . . With practice, you can get from trailer to the water in 90 minutes.


Wow. That kind of dampens my enthusiasm for an old Tiger. I think 30 minutes is too long and I'm shooting for 10 (with my 16). Would love to have a faster boat for inland sailing but a 90 minute setup is a show-stopper when you have to drive two hours each way for a day sail.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 4:25 am 
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AntonLargiader wrote:
MBounds wrote:
Try an F-18 . . . With practice, you can get from trailer to the water in 90 minutes.


Wow. That kind of dampens my enthusiasm for an old Tiger. I think 30 minutes is too long and I'm shooting for 10 (with my 16). Would love to have a faster boat for inland sailing but a 90 minute setup is a show-stopper when you have to drive two hours each way for a day sail.

However, once you have the mast up; rig tensioned; pole installed, rigged and tensioned and the spinnaker rigged (and stowed in the snuffer) - essentially in a configuration that can sit on the beach (but not for more than a week or so - sun damage to snuffer and spinnaker is $$$$) - then it only takes 10-15 minutes to raise the main and put on the jib to go sailing.

An F-18 is not a boat for trailer day sailing.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 6:28 am 
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AntonLargiader wrote:
Wow. That kind of dampens my enthusiasm for an old Tiger. I think 30 minutes is too long and I'm shooting for 10 (with my 16). Would love to have a faster boat for inland sailing but a 90 minute setup is a show-stopper when you have to drive two hours each way for a day sail.


Setup time is largely dependent on how familiar you are with the boat, how focused you are on getting it set up, and how many gizmos, etc, you have on the boat. If you have a Hobie 16 that you keep the rudders attached all the time, keep the blocks and boom connected to the main, keep the battens tight, have a basic jib halyard and downhaul, I think ten minutes might be a little bit of a challenge, but 15 probably isn't out of the question.

For Tiger, there's no way around the added set up time. It's simply a more complex boat with more parts to assemble. That being said, I'd be willing to bet that for casual sailing, there's probably a lot that could be done to simplify and speed up the setup process without having a major impact on performance.

I would guess that there are a large percentage of Hobie sailors (especially racers) that enjoy setting up and tinker with their boats as much as sailing them.

sm


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 7:28 am 
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I leave the battens tight and the boom (with mainsheet system) on the sail. I can see the reasons for not doing so, but I'm a day sailor and I feel the time issues I mentioned. Now, if I wanted to I could loosen the battens when I get home and tension them before I leave; I don't mind spending time at home but I don't want to spend it at the ramp. And I don't want to burn up my crew's time either; these are friends that want to sail and not wait around swatting mosquitoes (after a 2 hour car ride) while I fiddle with stuff.

I left the rudders on my '78 but I take them off the '00. With good pins and the '20' connectors, installing them is a 2-minute job for the crew.

With smartly chosen hardware, I think I have a 10-minute setup planned but time will tell. Will videotape my next one; might be as soon as this weekend.

To tie in to the original topic again, though, I suppose it is valuable to define 'trailerable' because for me trailerable means being able to go day sailing somewhere using my car (not a truck) with reasonable setup time. But someone else might have a much more forgiving definition.

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