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 Post subject: Do you love your Bravo?
PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 3:22 am 
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How happy are you with your Bravo? Should I buy one? I need all the positive fedback I can get.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2010 8:11 am 
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Location: Franklin Lakes, NJ
I like it for the lake I sail on, which is about 1/2 mile x. 3/4 miles. The lake is less than 10 min from my house and often I shoot down for a hour or so sail and the roller furling makes it very easy to show up and go on the fly. Also, the roller furling enables you to take it out on winder days and if there is to much wind, just furl it up a bit. I am in New Jersey and have been out a few times this past week as the weather was nice as the ice finally melted. For a bigger body of water, the wave is good, but does not have the roller furling and is a bit longer to get out on the water.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 23, 2010 4:06 am 
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Thanks so much for your reply. I do own a Wave but am thinking of swapping for the Bravo due to it's simplicity of Set Up. I sail mostly alone and am not so interested in fast sailing, just slow cruising. I think the Bravo will be ideal for all those reasons. Happy sailing. You're fortunate to be sailing this early in the season. I live in New Brunswick Canada. I'm afraid we'll be house bound for a while yet.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:43 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 8:16 am
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Location: Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Oh yes...still very frigid here in NB. My Bravo won't be hitting the water any time soon....it's still up in the loft of my garage. If you want to test drive one this Summer, I'm sure I can help you out.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 2:02 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:57 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Southern Illinois
jp wrote:
How happy are you with your Bravo? Should I buy one? I need all the positive fedback I can get.


Don't trade your wave just yet, jp. The Bravo is simple to rig, yes. But the mast is fairly heavy. If your main concern is rigging the Wave solo, consider this: Tie a light weight line somewhere near where the forestay connects, or even on the trailer. Make sure the line is long enough to come a couple of feet aft of the mast step at least four or so feet above the trampoline. Set the shrouds first. Then grab the line and tie a clove hitch around the mast where you'll be able to reach it as you walk the mast up. When the mast is on the mast step, push it forward tensioning the shrouds, and holding the forward tension with your shoulder, slide the hitch upward to get max tension so it holds the mast up when you let go. Then get off the boat and connect the forestay. When the forestay is set, untie the clove hitch. You're done!

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zerohelm


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 4:25 am 
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Thanks Zerohelm. I get what you're saying. I have been raising the mast on my Wave almost as you've stated. The part I dislike the most is raising the sail. The roller furling on the Bravo is so much simpler and easier to deal with. I see what you mean when you say the mast is heavy. Probably because it has the sail wound around it? I'm also imagining the roller furling being a much appreciated feature when sailing in heavier wind. Thanks again. I appreciate the input from people who have experienced both the Wave and the Bravo.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 01, 2010 8:22 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:57 pm
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Location: Southern Illinois
jp wrote:
Thanks Zerohelm. I get what you're saying. I have been raising the mast on my Wave almost as you've stated. The part I dislike the most is raising the sail. The roller furling on the Bravo is so much simpler and easier to deal with. I see what you mean when you say the mast is heavy. Probably because it has the sail wound around it? I'm also imagining the roller furling being a much appreciated feature when sailing in heavier wind. Thanks again. I appreciate the input from people who have experienced both the Wave and the Bravo.

Just remember that when you reef the Bravo, unlike reefing a conventional rig by rolling the foot of the sail, you will be moving the center of effort of the sail forward. Over-do it, and you will have trouble tacking. You can still jibe, though. Just keep your weight aft so the bow does not bury.

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zerohelm


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:17 am 
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Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 3:14 pm
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Location: Andover, CT
"Just remember that when you reef the Bravo, unlike reefing a conventional rig by rolling the foot of the sail, you will be moving the center of effort of the sail forward. Over-do it, and you will have trouble tacking. You can still jibe, though. Just keep your weight aft so the bow does not bury."

You just cleared up a mystery for me. That is what happened to me last year when I had it reefed in a lot. Thanks Zerohelm for the explanation. I will jibe next time and compensate by sitting aft.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 4:44 am 
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Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 3:14 pm
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Location: Andover, CT
Another reason regarding the difficulty one has tacking when reefed is your boat speed is also greatly reduced compared to the wind, making it difficult to pass through the eye at such a reduced speed and your bow act as brakes.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 12:44 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2009 11:34 am
Posts: 62
Location: Franklin Lakes, NJ
Roll tack the boat with the sail furled in. Did it this weekend (1/4 furl in) and that worked fine.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 11:20 am 
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Posts: 59
Location: Evansville, IN
Great thread about the Bravo. I had one, and often regret selling it. It is such a responsive boat, and so easy to launch and retreive. Like others have said, it has a lot to do with where you sail, and where you launch. For those of us that have to trailer to the lake, set up is a key feature, and it doesn't get easier than the Bravo.

On the lake the poster described, it is a great solution.. for someone that primarly sails solo. You can put two on the Bravo... and it is lots of fun, but not a lot of room for much else or for relaxing. I moved to the WAVE for the times I sail on larger water, and take someone with me.

In light wind - both boats sail about the same, when it starts to blow - the Bravo is like riding a bucking bronco...the Wave just gets in a groove and flies.

Can't go wrong with either.. the main thing is --- get one and go sail!

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'08 Hobie Wave, Hobie Adventure Islands


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2010 7:56 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 4:56 pm
Posts: 12
Location: BOISE ID
JP,

I just purchased the Bravo as I was looking for a fast, exciting, and easy boat to rig. It certainly is all that and then some.

I'm a little older and sorry to say out of shape. the boat with a breeze responds and moves well but with no healing action is very uncomfortable and long trips can be no fun with a sore back. When the wind picks up comfort level will improve but you will have to hike out but with lulls and gusts you will have quite a work out. This is the kind of action I would of like when I was younger. I only mention this as from reading your past post you mentioned that you wanted a more relaxing ride where I see the wave a better candidate for that.

If you want a comfortable ride with good back support, easy to set up, fast when the wind blows but not as fast as the wave. and options to fish from or even cruising from when the wind is not blowing. consider the Adventure Island. I did and was very happy with the decision, the mast and sail are so light you can hold it with one hand. I use a trailer so it is very easy on and off the water. If I had the money, I would have liked to have tried the wave but I go mostly solo so no regrets.

I hope this helps and hope you are able to try before you buy as this was not available to me as I live in a area where sailing isn't that popular and my closest dealer is 400 miles away.

Please let me know what you come up with


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2010 2:23 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2010 1:26 pm
Posts: 29
Location: SW Michigan
I guess I keep downsizing? I started with a Hobie 16 (sailing nirvana if you're into insane speed) but it was hard for me to launch/land by myself. Sold that and bought a Wave - had tons of fun with that! But hoping that my husband would actually go sailing with me - I bought a series of monohulls - the last being a Holder 12.

Now that I realize that I'm just going to be a singlehanded sailor (until I teach the grandkids to sail!) - I think the ease of a Bravo will be just what I need. In my case, I live on a big lake, so won't be raising and lowering the mast except to store for winter. The final "decider" is that the Bravo will fit on a spare boat lift we have, since we have no beach for it to live on. The Wave is too wide for the lift.

*IF* I was a trailer sailor - then it might be a toss-up between the Wave and the Bravo? I mean, it only take a couple minutes more to raise the sail - and the Wave can have a jib sail added for more horsepower. The Wave also comes completely apart - makes storing it for winter a little easier, I suspect?

Something that crossed my mind: since the Bravo will be kept "ready for use" - I'll be putting a cable lock on it! Normally thieves aren't interested in sailboats because they can only nab the boat/mast....most folks store the other parts elsewhere. The Bravo will be a complete package. While I haven't heard of anyone having a sailboat stolen - I don't intend to be the first.

Deb


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 04, 2010 2:22 am 
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Well, I did it. Sold the Wave and bought the Bravo. Haven't sailed it yet. Either too windy or to wet. Also, I'm a little apprehensive. Someone told me that they capsize pretty easily..so...I'm sort of waiting for the perfect day..it hasn't come yet. Go ahead, call me Chicken. Will let you know how my first time out was, if I ever take the plunge.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 05, 2010 6:52 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2010 1:26 pm
Posts: 29
Location: SW Michigan
JP - I picked up my Bravo on Tuesday - and FINALLY got to take her out on the Maiden Voyage early Sunday morning (I had just been really busy with work/family visiting for the holiday, etc)

Holy Cow!! What a GREAT little boat!

I'll admit that I had been afraid that I was about to sacrifice some of the Hobie Experience by sailing a "toy boat" - but that is really not the case. It's the most nimble Cat I've ever sailed - the winds were around 7, building to 10 mph; and it tacked and jibed with ease. I practiced "putting it in irons" and then sailing off, which it did handily. It seemed nice and stable - but then, I wasn't out in gale force winds (that will come later!) The boat felt balanced - neither wanted to turn into the wind nor off it - the tiller was light as a feather. Guess I can give my old sailing gloves to someone else :-) And at the end of my time on the lake - I just sailed it up to the front of our house, pointed her into the wind, and furled the sail. No bucking boat/flapping sails/chaos. It just doesn't get any easier than that:-)

The absolutely best part is the clear view under the sail (no more looking through a little window) and not worrying about the boom clocking you in the head!!! Plus - since my last few boats were smallish monohulls - not having to be in constant motion trying to balance the boat was wonderful.

I made a small change to the rigging - I can't see leaving the mainsheets out in the sun all the time - good line is expensive. So I added a small shackle to the end of the camcleat post; and added a snap shackle to the top of the tiller. Now I can simply remove the mainsheets and I keep them in the rear hatch.

I also ordered a closed-cell-foam exercise mat for the deck of the boat: I'm only 57 years young - but have the knees of a 150-yr old woman. I figure a little padding as I move back and forth can't hurt?

I definitely LOVE my Bravo! It's going to let me "sneak out for 1/2 hour of sailing" - a statement that seems impossible with most boats - heck, it takes that long just to RIG the darn things! But of course, now that I have a boat this handy, it's only going to fuel my addiction for playing in the wind......


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