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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2005 10:15 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 5:39 pm
Posts: 433
Location: West Texas
I got my wife boys' batting gloves last fall (end of baseball season) for like, $3.99 at Target and she loves them. I offered to order some Harken Black Magics like I do but she won't have it.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2005 5:38 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:43 am
Posts: 779
Location: St. Louis, MO
I have sailed both with and without gloves on large boats (300 ton square rigger) to Hobies and most thing in between. I found that if my hands will be relatively dry and the lines are 1" or more in diamter I can go without. But, on a Hobie you get very wet and the lines are fairly small in diameter. I am also contatnly adjusting the sail and in heavy winds I don't cleat off. So, my hands get really shredded when I don't use gloves. I also found that I have a better grip on and more control of the lines with gloves.

I bought my first H16 in college. I spent the money I had been saving for tuition on it (I earned a scholarship for that semester). I know about being a poor student sailor. You can afford to buy $30 gloves if you sacrafice something else. I would give up my one night out each week to buy sailing gear.

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Nick

Current Boat
In the market
Previous boats owned
'74 Pearson 30
'84 H16
'82 H18 Magnum
St. Louis, MO


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2005 6:40 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 5:39 pm
Posts: 433
Location: West Texas
SOOOOOOO JEALOUS. I want to sail on a tall ship!! Ref: my thread in the Open Forum on book recommendation.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2005 7:51 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 8:45 am
Posts: 759
Location: Clinton Lake Lawrence, KS
Alrighty then,

On the glove issue, let me clarify a big line is easier to hold barehanded. On little skiffs this is simple to do, as you have no where near the main sheet tension of an overpowered catamaran sail. Is it possible to sail cats barehanded? Yes. Do I sail barehanded? No.

On the righting line issue, I believe technique is the major contributing factor to how long it takes to right the boat, not the size of your line. When race or pleasure sailing it is obvious you don't want the mast in the water long. I was stating if a line is hanging over the hull, with which you could right the boat, that may be an advantage (less lines to mess with, less "clutter"). Is it easier to right a boat with a nice fat righting line? Of course. RH Mike just pointed out you can eliminate it. Ours is always getting snagged on stuff. I think next year we'll install a chicken wire for trapezing and try out using the downhaul for righting.

Thanks, I feel better now

:)

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hobiejohn at earthlink dot net
Fleet 297


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2005 11:26 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 5:39 pm
Posts: 433
Location: West Texas
Well sir I wish you the best of luck. Granted I have only ridden on / capsized / turtled a H18 ONCE so my experience is very limited; however I thought it odd that me and my friend both stood in the back corner of the boat and it did NOT want to come up from the turtled position. We just slowly floated downwind for a while and we had to get on the tiny 1/4" line and hang way out to get it so one hull was up. In that PARTICULAR situation on that PARTICULAR day, having a fat line would've allowed us to do right the boat ourselves without resorting to help from a (sob) jet ski. :)

Warm regards,

Jim


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 2005 7:26 am 
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Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 7:11 am
Posts: 47
Hobie Nick wrote:
I have sailed both with and without gloves on large boats (300 ton square rigger) to Hobies and most thing in between. I found that if my hands will be relatively dry and the lines are 1" or more in diamter I can go without. But, on a Hobie you get very wet and the lines are fairly small in diameter. I am also contatnly adjusting the sail and in heavy winds I don't cleat off. So, my hands get really shredded when I don't use gloves. I also found that I have a better grip on and more control of the lines with gloves.

I bought my first H16 in college. I spent the money I had been saving for tuition on it (I earned a scholarship for that semester). I know about being a poor student sailor. You can afford to buy $30 gloves if you sacrafice something else. I would give up my one night out each week to buy sailing gear.


hahaha well im in the same boat now...just kind of nt upto university yet...just kicking my last year at high school...then will be in canada for univ. Ill be paying my way thru school...so saving up right now...every little penny...so when i get there, im not broke, and put in my sink costs (books, laptop, first rent, etc).

its ok, my hands are totally ok with it now....so i guess once ppl develop callouses, then its ok....


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:09 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2009 9:22 am
Posts: 4
Location: Ontario, Canada
Recovering this thread, has anyone used a drift sock (sea anchor) like "http://stores.shop.ebay.ca/Best-Bargainz__W0QQ_sidZ37677734?_nkw=sock" to hold the bow into the wind while righting?
I am thinking of buying one but not sure how big to get.

I have found that in strong wind (when I most go over) the boat drags the mast and can move faster than I can swim (as flumpmsater warns). We can not get the boat to pivot 45 degrees by balance yet trapeze off the righting line at the same time. I have gone in the water to push the bow arround then climbed back on and jumped on the crew, already on the righting line, but as I have said this bothers me. We too (300lb) need to be almost horizontal to get it to come up. Once up, since we were into the wind, it does not take off. If I don't turn the bow into the wind, the wind holds the sail down in the water, as the mast is dragging, and we can not leverage it out of the water.

A pre-attached, small drift sock, stowed in the tramp pocket, could be easly deployed by throwing it under the bridal. This would slow down the drift and point the bow into the wind. True the drag line would chafe on the bridal but it is not out for long and I don't think it would hurt the bridal. Maybe a second line to the toe of the sock could be used for recovery to prevent unknow reaction to drag on the bows while hove to.

I bought a righting bucket for solo righting but it was not heavy enough. But that maybe because I could not be at the bow holding it into the wind and on the righting line at the same time. I think the correct size sock could solve this problem too.

Thoughts?


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 4:38 am 
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Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 7:37 am
Posts: 12
Location: Western Australia
I think a big enough sock to slow a capsized tiger enough to manouver is would be way to cumbersome to stow on the boat.
We capsize regulary as it is pretty windy where we sail. Our biggest hassle it the boat comes up by itself and the first person to get their act together gets up on the hull and leans on the Spi pole or mast to stop it righting itself and we be left behind.
As soon as the other is ready one sits down on the hull and the other traps off our righting rope and the boat comes back over so gracefully it doesnt make a sound.
My sister (60kgs) can pull it up with me just leaning on the striker enough to get the mast out of the water and we are up.
Too easy


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 10:20 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:18 pm
Posts: 15
Vid of us practicing righting out Tiger... We both wear Atlas gloves with the thumb and index finders cut off. Key is to get the righting line at the correct length with a knot for the crews tap hook. Keep the tip up and from turtle as fast as possible. Get the kite in the bag an then jump on the crews spreader bar. When the boat rights you have to grab the striker or risk losing it again...!!

We used the technique very effectively at the 2008 NA in 20+ KTS where we could flip and only still get righted in the top 3. BTW - the main was still cleated so it took 2X as long to right in the video attached.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHR2MeBUZTk

If you have any questions let me know.


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