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PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2006 1:59 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 11:04 pm
Posts: 617
Location: Hawaii, Big Island
Edited to update with photos. I figured it out.

Well my new Adventure has arrived. Here's a rather long rambling discussion of her delivery and preliminary prep.

If your like me you are far from any dealer. My distributor is on Oahu. I'm on the Big Island of Hawaii. Here's what I experienced on pickup. I provide some detail for others isolated from dealerships.

Young Brother's (inter-island barge company) let me drive my truck to the yak where stored. I had my Nissan pickup with a roof rack and rear rack previously build for a 30lb OC-1 (one man out rigger canoe).

The yak was surrounded by a layer of bubble wrap, than a thick plastic sheathing, and strapped on a small pallet . Paddle, drive, and other parts were firmly secured inside bubble wrap in against hull. A+ job.

The distributor had the pallet cut down in anticipation of Young Brothers requirements. Which is to remove your packaging.

In anticipation I brought along a hacksaw for the bands, and knife and scissors . I was fortunate enough to have Young brother's permit me to put the plastic in a dumpster, but was still required to take the pallet. Thanks to Marlene cutting it down it fit in my short bed as I had forgot my hammer and crowbar.

I did an inventory check of paddle, seat, etc as I unpacked. I had brought along a camera to shoot any damage, but pics were not required.

I flagged down a worker and he helped me get the yak on my truck. It weighs IIRC 69 #s, so this was not trivial for one man. Piece of cake for two.. More on this later.

I have a shot of some of the stuff I accumulated prior to the yak's arrival, plus the cart.

Image

Pictured is a simple five gallon bucket storage/rigging rack. Functional, but pretty unstable, but works if you get it on balanced, and is cheap. Maybe someone can post a fastener system for the 2X4's on the other thread with the buckets turned upright. Then a little cement in the bottom, etc.

I was worried about interference from RAM balls during enter and exit from the yak if spear fishing, swimming, etc. so I wanted to simulate a mount for the RAM balls. Otherwise would have gone for Scotty flush mounts.

Pictured are the golf balls (real not wiffles as originally proposed) that I later duct taped to the proposed RAM ball mounting positions. I had first used auto goo to hold them in scrap foam blocks.

Image

No problema from anything getting back in after deliberately huli (capsize).
Also they are so far forward that when slipping into the water for swimming, etc they are out of the way. The Hobbie hold down for the paddle , however, is NOT. It catches your trunks when deliberately slipping over the side into the drink.

Anotherphoto shows golf balls installed for the test, and includes my addition of reflector tape for night fishing. A feeble attempt at graphics design versus a plain rectangular strip. Hey Hobie build reflection tape into graphics! Nike and every shoe manufacture does.

Pictured in the first photo is the kupuna step I stole from the SINK yak thread. It's a foot of old garden hose threaded with clothesline. I didn't need it getting back in (I'm an old OC-6/1 paddler), but my spouse might. I'll report on her efforts later, but the way I see it rigged, tied off on the opposite side of entry, she won't need a paddle for stabilization, ala the SINK technique..

The cart is interesting. Wheels are very light weight plastic with a wide soft (not air filled) rubber tire. Off an initial impression you think it's cheap, but performance is not. The guts are the frame which is quite sturdy chromed tubing that beats the pants off any irrigation plastic homemade model.

Mine performed beautifully on any hard road surface, pivoting on a dime.

Across grass, a small rocky beach, and packed sand, no problema.

Deep soft sand could be another story, but so far haven't encountered any. (Big Island is relatively young) However if that's your environment Hobie wheels may still work. If you have to change over to wide pneumatics remember the frame is your gold salvage.

I stuffed four of the pictured big Wall Mart Noodles into the front hull section with some room left over for gear. See also Noodle as a life jacket thread.

Had to pull the big noodle out of the back and insert the narrow one(kids to 5 yrs. on label) from the rear hull . Still getting some cable interference to rudder. May have to go with cut larger ones inserted crosswise.

The surgical tubing will be used as lures and a fish calling device. Blue water Hunter has a tip on strumming spearfish gun bands to attract fish. Why not for jigging, etc? I'm going to try a one string fiddle.

The compass is a standard and will be installed as described in other thread.

Also pictured is a rod leash. I'm getting worried about all the straps and lines spread all over the cockpit. Maybe I can see them with the pizzoelectric flashlight (brown thing you can grind-has flashing and steady capability. Or reflection from tape on left.

Not pictured are my charts. First I plotted the island's Fish Aggrvatig Devices (FADs).

I drew and labeled magnetic course lines to various light, stacks, etc. I took our island, split it in half and glued it back to back. During Christmas trip to mainland went to Kinko's and had it laminated. (be sure there is at least 1/2 inch of plastic overlap when trimming)Then duct taped edges. Another idea others might use is to line the top of their tackle boxes with their local charts. Mine even pre-trimmed is pretty big so figure it will be rolled up, stuffed somewhere.

When I got the yak home first thing I did was put it up on my bucket racks (it was after sunset), turnout garage lights, insert a flashlight into each hull hatch area, and check for pin holes. None as later evidenced by no water entry during huli practice.

I pulled the scupper plugs in the seat and am trying to figure a use for the scupper plugs provided for the rear storage. Don't need them in Hawaii water. Do need drainage if sea comes up.

Interesting Hobie accommodates both warm rough water and cold calm. Although I guess the So. Cal guys would claim a seat with plugged scupper drains, with a little non circulating water would be a warm butt suit. :P

Onto more seriousness. The Owners manual is feeble. I have posted comments on adjusting the Mirage Drive before. For guys not NEAR A DEALER (hey Matt how you going to support us!!) We need more info. Maybe a video?

And I'd like to see some info on how to replace a busted rudder cable. Try peering into the hull using your wife's compact mirror, and guessing based on the meager info in the owner's manual.

Hey it's going to happen, two or three years out. I've seen too many cables break on surf ski's ,etc, including my own OC-1 due to S&S (stress and salt). More on an emergency rig that will help you steer later.

I'll post more as I go along.

Aloha

Dan


Last edited by AlohaDan on Tue Jan 10, 2006 10:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2006 1:16 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 6:56 am
Posts: 822
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Dan,
Thanks for the great report on your new BigA. But I gotta suggestion for ya, if you don't mind. It would be a big help to all of us if you could reduce the size of your pics to a size that our computer monitors can handle. I have a 20 inch monitor and even I can't see the whole post (17 inches wide side to side).

What I and most other folks do is to use our photo editing software to reduce the size of each pic before posting. For example, I re-size all mine to no more than 8 inches (576 pixels) by 6 inches (432 pixels). Or you can just use 600 x 450 pixels to round off. Give it a try to see if this works in your software. Thanks.
Best,
Dick

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:00 pm 
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Hobie Team Member

Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 11:04 pm
Posts: 617
Location: Hawaii, Big Island
Thanks. I can do that.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2006 5:37 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2005 3:15 pm
Posts: 122
Location: Sandy Eggo
Dan... You're e VERY lucky guy!!

1) You live in one of Earth's most beautiful places.
2) You own a Hobie Adventure.

Could you please post a photo of your S.O.?! I can't wait to see her!!

Congrats on the new "Big A" & Thanks for the pics.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2006 11:40 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 11:04 pm
Posts: 617
Location: Hawaii, Big Island
Apalach

Cut the photo down. Anymore and you lose what poor detail I have. Does it now fit your screen?

Some feedback on what I posted.

The Everfix Epoxy Stick directions state it is NOT recommended for polyethylene. Evidently fibreglass/metal sticky stuff doesn't adhere very well to poly. Telephoning around one manufacture of polyethylene products said it might hold enough to work as a repair. I suspect that's a case if your on a remote trip and are able to make it ashore. Your could make a T shape, top of the T inside the hull and duct tape the outside and inside. Actually a roll of clear plastic packaging tape might be better in this case. Uncle Bobby in his koa canoe repairs during state races uses it all the time (there are collisions during state races and QUICK repairs are necessary due to other crews using the koa). Perhaps a Hobby engineer or polyethylene chemist can comment. I don't see a heat gun and poly stick being a solution here !

But I found an alternative lying around the garage for at sea repairs versus being able to haul out. A gardening/kneeling pad. Cheap. I'm going to cut it into 1/2" 1' and 2' inch strips.
Then if there is a crack hole you just jam it in with whatever tool is handy.

If you go read some of the Hornblower series you might find an emergency use for your sail! Hey all about survival. :lol:

The better half (*not a young chick, but game) is having a problem with the kupuna step. (Garden house loop for getting in in deep water). It is always drifting out of place and adjusting the height under stress is difficult .We are trying a different technique later and will let you know result. She handles the yak pretty good, peddling or paddling in the harbor, but I'm not about to let her go to sea without being able to do a deep water reentry.

I went ahead and installed the RAM ball mounts. Looking at the yak on top of my truck I realized a water test of the golf balls was not enough for those that have different vehicle mounting problems. For that reason alone you might consider the Scotty flush mounts with the RAM ball insert. I don't have a problem because I load the yak right side up, and flip it when it's on-top of the truck. The ball mount is out of the way the whole time in my configuration. But.. crank this thought into your equation.

The better half has been diligently working out with military presses. She can handle 40-50# or her share of the yak weight when on a 75-85# weight bar and me on the other end, lifting overhead, lowering etc, So she's getting there. I can still do 80-90# in the gym by myself. But 16 feet of unbalanced yak waving around is another story for the Elvis generation.

So we are doing the old put the yak at the end of the truck (rudder first; easy with the Hobie cart). I get under and lift the yak to the rear cross bar, she keeps a piece of foam under the yak nose as it drags. Once the yak is positioned, I go to the other end (bow) lift it (relatively easy) and slide it to the next bar (approx. driver door.) Climb up into the tuck bed and flip it using the grips. Piece of cake to tie down. We are going to put rollers on the rear support to make everything easier. (If I can find some 27" long; commercial lawnmower rollers?). Getting it off is just the reverse.

Problema. I'm by-myself. The nose of the yak will drag on the deck putting it up, or lowering it. Albeit it's just a few inches , but why the rudder goes on first. Difficult to keep anything under the bow for protection that will slide on the pavement. Working on a cheap set of "nose wheels". Anyone solved this?

BTW Hobie I'll cough up $2800 K for a Kevlar version that goes 18-20 feet, and weighs in less than 35# without the drive. Think a wide stable surf ski with the drive. Ought to fly, particularly under sail. Us older folks have $, but have difficulty handling the weight during transport. In the meanwhile I'll settle for a nose wheel for $15.:D :D


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2006 8:57 am 
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Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 6:56 am
Posts: 822
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Yeah Dan--that's much better. Don't know why you would lose detail for posting though. I cut my 5.1 megapixel pics down to 8x6 inches from 36x27 inches, without any noticeable loss of detail with regard to posting. However, you would definitely lose detail if you were to print at the lower resolutions.

One thing that might help with the re-entry is if you have gunwale paddle keeper bungees. Insert one blade of the paddle under the near bungee while in the water, and push it across the boat. Then swim around to the far side to secure the blade under the far bungee. Then swim back to other side to pull yourself up. This way you can pull yourself up and over the deck, while the near paddle blade acts to help stabilize the boat since it sticks out into the water 4-5 ft. or so. You can also buy inflatable paddle blade flotation sleeves to keep the blade on the surface while you attempt the re-entry.

Also a good idea in areas with strong currents is to keep a 30-foot coil of anchor-type line on the rear deck, but not secured in any way (except to the stern at one end!). If you do flip, the line goes into the water and will trail out in the current behind your boat so that you can grab onto it as the boat is being carried away from you. I would probably stow this safety line before gong thu the surf however. A paddle leash is sometimes a good idea in such situations, but don't use one for surf transits. Just my $.02.
Have fun and be safe!
Dick

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Last edited by Apalach on Wed Jan 11, 2006 11:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Paddle leash
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2006 10:31 am 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
Posts: 9329
Location: Oceanside, California
Apalach wrote:
A paddle leash is sometimes a good idea in such situations, but don't use one for surf transits.


I like the paddle leash when in the surf. If I flip, I slip my hands to the middle of the paddle next to the leash point and hold on tight. The boat will swing nose first into the surf until I get a break in the waves to climb back on.

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Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2006 10:45 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2005 10:39 pm
Posts: 84
Location: San Diego, CA
Here are a couple cautionary (anecdotal) tales about landing or launching through surf with exposed lines or leashes.

A friend was riding in throught he surf and was flipped, the paddle leash wrapped around his ankle and as his boat was pushed down the beach he was being dragged with it.

I had a similar experience with an improperly secured sabiki rig wrapping my arm when I was dumped in the surf. I still have scars from that one.

My best advice is stow leashes and gear, if you're not putting rods below decks then cut your lines and wind them up, secure them with rod leashes or tie-downs of some sort so that when you flip your gear is safe and secured and you won't get any nasty surprises.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2006 12:21 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 11:04 pm
Posts: 617
Location: Hawaii, Big Island
Alpalach. I cropped instead of shrinking pixels. Sorry I wasn't clearer.

But Alpalach a major disagreement here. Your stern line while a good idea is not a substitute for a yak leash. IMHO the most important safety line you can have.

I use a coiled surf leash, attached to my right ankle. Doesn't interfere with pedaling or paddling. No way is that 16 foot PFD getting away from me.

I'll try a fishing "pivot" to check for leash interference there. I heard a story a guy from here was on TV the other day bringing in a monster. Has a set of cross foot braces behind his seat so when he turns aft he can still pump the fish.(Matt make one part of the new outrigger sail kit?)

Next big windy day I'm out I'll run a drift test by slipping into water with my swimming rig. (I just attach the surf leash to my 20' bow line and let the yak drift behind while swimming). See how fast it can drift away, and report same. :wink:

An OC-1 (which is much lighter ) can get away from you in a NY second. Don't forget a small roller effect from fast running swells also. I see some of the So. Cal guys getting out quite far on other threads. It' at least 3 miles out to the nearest FAD off Keauhou, then there's night disorientation,Hilo side when trades are up, etc other conditions.

So with all due respect to Drew in the surf line which I can agree with, "Leashup or die". :!:


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2006 2:11 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 11:04 pm
Posts: 617
Location: Hawaii, Big Island
Here's a thread from kfs that discusses the poly adhesive question.

http://kfs.infopop.cc/groupee/forums/a/ ... 5581001551


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