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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 1:10 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 9:18 am
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Location: Boise, Idaho
Hi Folks,

Lurking for a year; first post.

I bought a 2008 Getaway last year and I'm having a blast with it. I have done a few things with it that some of you may be interested in.

First, I built a trailer that carries the Getaway, two ATVs, four mountain bikes, two kayaks, and a windsurfer. We call it "The Toy Box." It has a telescoping forward mast crutch that extends 4' to allow us to pull it behind our motorhome. Here it is with just the Hobie and ATVs:

Image

Image

I built the sail tube out of 12" irrigation pipe ($50) and two wastebasket lids from Walmart ($10).

Since I wanted to use the ATVs or flatbed trailer without the boat periodically, I built an electric hoist in my garage that lifts the boat from the trailer and suspends it from the ceiling.

Image

I used a 110V electric winch from Harbor Freight (http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44006) connected through pulleys to four hoisting lines. The pulleys are shackled to half chain links welded to two transversely mounted 1" square steel tubes, which, in turn, are lag screwed to the ceiling trusses. All lines run through co-located pulleys mounted in the middle of the forward tube so that all hoisting lines travel the same distance.

Image

I use soft nylon lead rope (for horses, 1,100 lb. working load) to sling under the boat and connect to the hoisting lines. If I moved the trailer, I could easily park a car under the boat. The whole setup cost about $175 and took about four hours to construct.

Since I couldn't right the boat with my 175 lbs., I built a righting pole from half of a discarded windsurfer mast. I attached a pair of opposing stainless deck eyes from West Marine to the fat end and another pair about three-fourths of the length toward the tip, then used nylon river straps to lash to the factory righting line attach points at the front corners:

Image

The loose end is held up in place to the tramp lacing with a short river strap. To use, I release the short strap and swing the pole 90° so it looks like an extension of the mast below the boat. Then, I loosen the lower black strap and tighten the upper black strap (while standing on the lower hull) to cant the pole up about 20° toward the upper hull. Then, just step off the lower hull and hang from the pole. Up she comes. When the boat starts to move forward, the pole swings up under the rear crossbar and I grab the trailing short strap and re-lash to the tramp lacing.

I lost patience with the pin and ring clips for attaching the jib on my first outing. I replaced the factory jib pin with an aerospace-grade, mil-spec Jergens Kwik-Lok quick-release pin (http://www.jergensinc.com). These are quick and easy and incredibly strong (9,200 lbs. shear vs. less than 7,000 lbs. strength of the jib cable). They are expensive (about $30) but worth it.

I replaced the factory tiller stick with a telescoping paint roller extension from Home Depot. This cost about $10 and works great. I just drilled a hole in the end, filed to fit, and installed in the factory bracket with a Jergens quick release pin. This is far superior to the factory fiberglass stick.

Finally, after an unintended swim off the back of the wing seat, leaving my family (who didn't know how to sail) disappearing into the sunset (while I shouted instructions for releasing the sheets and turning into the wind), I installed hiking straps at the outer edges of the tramp, right next to the hulls. I used the same webbing and grommets as the factory so they look like original equipment and they work great -- nice for when it's really blowing!

I'd be happy post or send additional pictures or details if anyone is interested.

Gordon


Last edited by GPratt on Mon Oct 06, 2008 6:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 2:09 pm 
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I humbly bow to your ingenuity! Those are some great, great ideas. Great post and thanks for sharing. I'm definitely going to check into that paint roller extension idea!

Jeff


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 4:48 pm 
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Location: Boise, Idaho
Jeff,

There are many paint roller extensions at Home Depot and Lowes. I used a simple (light and cheap) two-section aluminum one. It extends from 38" to 71" and locks at any point between with a quarter turn.

I just drilled and filed the end to fit the factory yoke on the tiller crossbar:
Image

Gordon


Last edited by GPratt on Tue Oct 07, 2008 11:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 5:08 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2007 4:54 am
Posts: 37
Location: Hickory, NC, USA
Very nice post.

How do you get the boat of the trailer once at the beach?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 5:18 pm 
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Location: Boise, Idaho
Krona,

Idaho is all lake sailing with limited beach, virtually none accessible from the roads. I have always launched and retrieved at a boat ramp, which is easily done single-handed, even without unloading the ATVs. To launch, I just back the trailer into the water until the rear rollers are six inches or so above the water and slide the boat off. To load, I stand on the back of the trailer, between the bows of the hulls, lift the front of the boat a few inches onto the aft rollers, then connect the winch and crank it on.

I suspect I would have to enlist help to load it from a beach should I ever be fortunate enough to launch from one.

Gordon


Last edited by GPratt on Tue Oct 07, 2008 11:38 am, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Quick release pin
PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 8:50 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 12:10 pm
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Location: SE Pennsylvania
Regarding the "Jergens Kwik-Lok quick-release pin", do you have the exact part number/size?

Thanks,
Bob


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 Post subject: Re: Quick release pin
PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 8:58 am 
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Location: Boise, Idaho
BobCat wrote:
Regarding the "Jergens Kwik-Lok quick-release pin", do you have the exact part number/size?

Thanks,
Bob


Bob,

For the jib, the part number is 800616. For the tiller stick, part number 800618. The only difference is the length.

Here is a link to the product spec page:
http://www.jergensinc.com/infodir/catalog.asp?GroupNum=1352
Scroll down to the "Stainless" table and click on the desired part numbers to order direct from the factory. These two will run you about $32 for the pair.

Gordon


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 Post subject: Wow
PostPosted: Sun Feb 01, 2009 10:35 am 
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Outstanding ingenuity. I would apprectiate more info on how you fit the kayaks as I'm hoping to weld up something similiar to handle our Getaway and two mirage tandems.

I will order the quick pins tomorrow, though I plan on using an additional quick pin on the forestay (jib) for security. Between the quick pin and a piece of PVC (see earlier post) to tension the furler, single handed rigging should be easy.

_________________
Winging It
2007 Getaway


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2009 5:26 pm 
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Location: Boise, Idaho
Winging It,

Sorry for the late response. I ski and snowmobile all winter so I don't get onto the forum until I start thinking about sailing again.

I lash the kayaks to the wing seat supports (inboard). Quick an easy. If we don't take the ATVs, we just slide the kayaks under the Hobie on the flatbed.

We have one single holer and one Ocean Duo triple and have no problem hauling them around.

Gordon


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:16 pm 
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Great ideas! Thanks!

I have specific questions on the frame where the boat sits in the trailer.
In the pictures they look like kind of flat beds, with no rollers, correct?
And can you give me the exact separation between both sides? I mean, assuming those are two long wooden slats, what is the width of each one and what is the exterior max separation between both? (in a sense the max width of your trailer at the boat height).
I am thinking on building a similar adaptation to my power boat trailer, so I can use the same trailer for both boats when I need to take one of of the water.
thanks


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:38 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 9:18 am
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Location: Boise, Idaho
Axel,

The bunks measure about 14" x 80". They were made from 1/4" AC plywood covered with indoor/outdoor carpet. The frame is 1" square steel tubing. The overall width was 93".

There is a wide roller at each end.

The bunks were made to adjust up an down depending on what I carried underneath.

This arrangement worked great for two years and many trips. I have since replaced the Getaway with a Bravo, which is much more fun for the kind of sailing I do (usually just me and one or both of my kids). It rigs in minutes, flys a hull easily, even on a broad reach, and I can right it in 20 seconds when I dump it. I built another trailer for the Bravo that also carries the two kayaks and four mountain bikes and I can tow it behind the ATV trailer when we want to take the whole shootin' match.

I have sketches of the trailer that I worked from when I built it if you are interested.

I also still have some parts, including the triangulated end pieces with roller assemblies that you can have if you pay the shipping. These represent most of the work. A few hours with a welder and some touch-up spray paint could have them back together on a new trailer. One side has the mount for the sail tube.

I also have an extended mast support and the old winch that you can have as well for the cost of shipping. The mast support adjusted to raise the mast when towing behind my motorhome and lower it behind the SUV.

I have the material for a new, better telescoping mast support and a new winch, which together cost me $225. I will sell these for $125 plus shipping.

I will also sell the electric ceiling hoist for $250 if you have use for it.

I can send photos of all (and the sketch) if you send me your e-mail address (send to gordon dot pratt at cobham dot com).

Gordon


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2010 5:18 pm 
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Gordon,
Thanks a lot for the info. I still did not make my mind in terms of reforming my current trailer, so not immediate needs really.
But I appreciate your offer and indeed will email you if I see an opportunity to use any of the parts.
thanks!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 01, 2010 3:25 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 3:58 am
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Hi Gordon.
Great improvements!!
I had used a paint roller extension as hiking stick before, but unfortunately it broke during a violent pitchpole.
Can you post more details about how you attached the fat end of the windsurfing mast to the main crossbar?

thanks!


Guillermo


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 01, 2010 8:31 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 9:18 am
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Location: Boise, Idaho
I used two stainless pad eyes like this:

http://www.highlandrigging.com/shopping ... yNumber=25

attached opposite one another at the fat end like this: (| |)

I then connected them them with river straps (1" camlock) to the factory righting line attach points like this:

O======(| |)======O

This keeps the fat end of the windsurfing mast centered under the base of the mast. No other attachment is necessary because the righting loads are taken by the bottom strap (when the boat is on its side). The angle can be adjusted if necessary by tightening and loosening the straps on opposing sides.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 03, 2010 9:52 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 20, 2009 7:04 pm
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:D WOW
YOU are over the top smart.
what is your day job ,head engineer for boeing or microsoft??
hobie should hire you as a consultant.. it would take me 3 months to build what u did ... if i could ...congrats

your boise state football team cleaned the clocks of my now humbled va. tech team ,great team ,i now follow an root for them

i will reread your postings ,i'm sure in all that info is that something i can use to get my mast up by myself without buying a mast stepper 3 ..i have a wench on another trailer ..i just got a 2001 getaway from my friend in kitty hawk n.c. that stayed unmoved in his driveway for 3 years now its my turn lol. thanks, bill


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