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PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 2:48 pm 
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What are some of the things I will need if I wanted to start picking up sailing as a hobby? A boat and that's it or do I need way more little things than that?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 4:19 pm 
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A boat is not the first thing to get. In fact, it should be one of the last things you get.

Some books on the subject would be a start. Maybe some friends to take you along on their boats.

The absolute best way is to find a community sailing center, but they are few and far between.

Where are you located?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 4:55 pm 
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Sailing isn't like powerboating. You can't just hop in and go. I would take some lessons as a local sailing center.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 6:14 pm 
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While I would never discourage you from listening to the responses above, because they are correct, I do have one thing to add to your shopping list, even if you don't end up buying it.

Consider the Adventure Island (or Tandem Island)

Some don't consider them to be "real" sailboats, but I'm out on it a lot more then some of the other more experienced sailors. The roller furling sail, the tremendous stability, and the ability to peddle back to shore if the wind dies are a few great reasons to consider it.

The biggest reason to consider it: If you're like me, and have never really sailed before, you'll find that this boat is easy to learn to sail in just about any condition. Will you out grow it? Maybe. But this discussion board is filled with guys who have all kinds of experience sailing and still come back to the AI or TI boats.

Not saying it's for everyone, but a lot of people that I know would never have considered it until they see me out on mine keeping up with them in their bigger but more complicated boats. It's a fun, safe, and easy to learn boat.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 6:42 pm 
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Hmm.... thank you for the responses. I live about 15 minutes from Grand Haven on Lake Michigan, so I'm sure there might be a community boating center. And I agree getting lessons and or books on sailing would be a good place to start. But what would be the next step after that? And yes the simpler and easier to use the boat is the better so I will look into that one.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 10:50 pm 
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Location: Dallas,TX / College Station,TX
Anybody can sail

When I was stationed in San Diego I watched people sailing quite often.

The Military marina, Fiddlers cove required one to take a class in order to rent there sail boats.

I bought the book put out by the red cross and read it. took the written test.
and then they wanted to see me sail a 14ft capri out of the marina and then back into the marina.
Bringing it back in was the tricky part because I was going into the wind.
Plus I had never even been on a sailboat before nore had never sailed.

But I jumped in the boat, kept an eye on the wind indicator and pulled it off like a champ.

Anybody can sail.
Just depends how enthusiastic one is.

Took my Hobie 16 out for the first time in 13knot winds and was flying the hull with no harness. Had never even sailed a hobie or a catarmaran before either.

Just got to put yourself out there and be careful


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 2:51 am 
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First up, I'd check to see if there are any state rules that you are required to follow, such as these from the state of Maryland:

Quote:
Maryland’s Boating Safety Education Law is designed to assure that the younger generations of boaters have fundamental knowledge of boating rules and safety and that eventually, all boaters will be operating their boats with a basic level of boating education. The law also imposes the requirement for persons convicted of certain boating violations to successfully complete a boating safety education course regardless of the age of the operator.

The Boating Safety Education Law requires that any person born on, or after July 1, 1972, must have in their possession a certificate of boating safety education while operating a numbered or documented vessel on Maryland waters. The certificate may be obtained by completing an approved boating safety course or passing an equivalency examination. The Natural Resources Police offer the Maryland Basic Boating Course through local recreation departments and community colleges or on-line. The classroom course is 8-10 hours in length and covers the basics of boating and water safety. The on-line course is offered by Boat Ed, the official provider of the Maryland Basic Boating Course.


I agree that anyone can simply buy a boat and sail (I see it all the time and steer well clear of them), but would hate to see forum members here labeled as "that guy" because of not doing it safely or being a menace to others on the water.

A good book or two would be a great starting point, so as to get familiar with sailing terms and to understand better everything that's involved with sailing. I have a FAQ on my blog that you can read to help you with ideas on where to go from there. Forums and blogs are also good steps to follow, as well as some lessons or crewing.

I never took a formal sailing class, but learned by reading up first and getting out on the water. Nothing beats experience on the water.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 5:01 am 
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logan9122 wrote:
Hmm.... thank you for the responses. I live about 15 minutes from Grand Haven on Lake Michigan, so I'm sure there might be a community boating center. And I agree getting lessons and or books on sailing would be a good place to start. But what would be the next step after that? And yes the simpler and easier to use the boat is the better so I will look into that one.

There's a fairly active Hobie fleet (519 - Austin Lake Catamaran Assoc.) just south of Kalamazoo in Portage. They race once a week during the summer. They're always looking to get new people out on the water. http://www.austinlakecatamaran.com/

There's also a guy who posts here fairly regularly - DVL (Dale Van Lopik) from Muskegon who's a long time Hobie 18 sailor. He would be a good person to talk to about sailing and boats.

While the AI and TI are neat boats, they are still kayaks with sails. Their biggest drawback is that they can only carry one (AI) or two (TI) people. A traditional Hobie Cat can carry two adults and a couple of kids with no problem. The AI and TI would not handle the waves on Lake Michigan very well.

Besides all that, I think you'll find the greatest impediment to sailing will be water access. You can't just pull up to the beach in Grand Haven, pull the boat off the trailer and go sailing. That's where hooking up with a Hobie Fleet will be most beneficial.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 9:24 am 
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MBounds wrote:
The AI and TI would not handle the waves on Lake Michigan very well.


I have to respectfully disagree with this statement. I sail my AI all the time on Lake Ontario, and often go out when other sailboats choose to stay in because of the larger waves. There are all kinds of users on this forum who sail the Great Lakes, or the Oceans.

The AI, is a one person boat, but with trampolines you can take a couple small kids for an easy cruise. The weight limit for the boat is 350 pounds.

The TI with trampolines can carry up to 600 pounds, and the trampolines are built to hold as much as 200 lbs, (total weight limit is still 600 pounds) so you can take more then 2 people on that as well. Both boats perform best with one or two people, but with trampolines you will have the option of taking others, in the same way as you would on a regular Hobie Catarmaran.

I still agree that they're not for everyone, but for a new sailor, they are a great way to get out on the water and move under sail power.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 9:35 am 
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The other thing I should mention is the AI allows me to not have to be part of a sailing club. I'm close enough to the lake to walk it down on the Hobie cart, pull it across the beach, and sail without leaving anything on the beach. I also can rooftop the boat and launch from just about anywhere.

One day I'd like to move up to a Hobie Catamaran, but I'm sailing more with this boat then I would be with any other boat, because it's so easy to rig and launch from anywhere.

If you want to go "sailing" with the sailing club guys, then it's not the boat, but to just experience the wind and waves, it's a great option, and everyone who doesn't sail still considers it a sailboat... not simply a kayak with a sail. I've been on a "kayak with a sail" and the AI is much more then that.

I'm done now... promise! :?

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 9:39 am 
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Sailing an AI is not the same as a full on catamaran. If you want to sail fast get a cat, if you want to paddle get a kayak, if you want both get an AI. As far as learning to sail a cat a good place to start is Hobie U. Informative and free. http://www.hobieclass.com/default.asp?Page=1686 :wink:


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 5:00 pm 
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MBounds wrote:
The AI and TI would not handle the waves on Lake Michigan very well.

I think you need to experience Chesapeake chop before making such a blanket statement. And yes - the TI handles it fine, thank-you-very-much.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 5:41 pm 
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whosyerbob wrote:
MBounds wrote:
The AI and TI would not handle the waves on Lake Michigan very well.

I think you need to experience Chesapeake chop before making such a blanket statement. And yes - the TI handles it fine, thank-you-very-much.

Before you make such a blanket statement, you should know that I grew up on the lower Chesapeake Bay - Fishing Bay/Piankatank River to be precise.

I know what Chesapeake chop is like. It doesn't compare to Lake Michigan, which is more like an ocean than a lake.

I've raced my 16, 17 and Tiger in 7 - 9 foot waves on that lake. People go surfing on it - in the winter when the waves are even bigger.

Conditions like that would take any of the Island kayaks and crumple them up like matchsticks.

Here's what it looked like a couple of weeks ago in Grand Haven:
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Surf's up!


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 7:30 pm 
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logan9122: Drop me a e-mail at: dale.vanlopik "at"att"dot"net. There is a few of us Hobie 18/16 sailors in Grand Haven/Holland area that keep the boats on a beach north of GH. Some sail cats and mono hulls, all are friendly and would take you & wife out for a spin around the lake and teach you.
Read books, magazines, and then just do it. BTW: Matt is correct, you can learn a lot from a local fleet, Austin Lake, and they are great people.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:44 am 
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MBounds wrote:
It doesn't compare to Lake Michigan, which is more like an ocean than a lake.

I've raced my 16, 17 and Tiger in 7 - 9 foot waves on that lake. People go surfing on it - in the winter when the waves are even bigger.

Conditions like that would take any of the Island kayaks and crumple them up like matchsticks.

Here's what it looked like a couple of weeks ago in Grand Haven:
Image
Surf's up!



The "Islands" sail just fine in the Great Lakes.

The original question was from a person who hasn't got any sailing experience. I've been out in Lake Ontario in 6 foot waves, and both my boat, and I are fine. In fact, it was fun!

Looking at your picture, it doesn't matter what boat you have, a new sailor should not be out in those conditions. (and I don't see any boats around, so maybe the experienced sailors understand that fact too). When you say that "in the winter the waves are even bigger" you're right, but there aren't many new sailors who are going to go out on the Great Lakes in the winter. Let's be real. The Great Lakes are perfectly suitable for most Hobie products. I live on one, and was able to sail my AI the entire summer with very few exceptions.

Sometimes there's a bit of elitism on these boards when it comes to the Adventure Island and Tandem Island. We all understand they're different then a Cat, but let's not act like they're not Hobie's. They're great boats for certain users, and in my case, a perfect boat for a new sailor.

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