Hobie Cat Forums

It is currently Mon Sep 01, 2014 12:13 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 77 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: New Hobie Revolution 11!
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2011 8:24 am 
Offline
Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2395
Location: Escondido
What new Hobie kayak has strong styling cues from the Oasis, a fine bow like the Adventure, the amazing turning of the Pro Angler and the name of the Revolution? That's right, it's the new Revolution 11! At first glance, Hobie's newest offering may appear to be just a smaller, lighter copy of the Revolution (now renamed Revolution 13), but this boat is a keel-up new design 3 years in the making, reflecting the latest thinking of the Hobie design wizards.

Specifications and general layout:

Length over all: 11' 6" -- with rudder down and deployed (measured). That is 24" shorter than the Revo 13.
Width: 29" -- 1/4" narrower than the Revo 13 (measured)
Weight: 47 lb. (published) -- 57.5 lb. on my scale (net with hatches, rudder system, etc, but no seat, paddle or Drive) -- about 16 lb. lighter than the Revo 13.
Rated load capacity 300 lbs, or 50 lb. less than the Revo 13.

Here's a R11 sitting directly in front of a R13. You can see the similarities and some of the differences in profiles:
Image

The cockpit appears to be about one inch shorter than that of the Revo 13 / Outback. Width is about the same in the seat area and about one inch WIDER than the Revo 13 in the foot well. The cockpit is cozy and comfortable in most respects, the one exception being the rudder control handle poking the leg on hard right turns. Although the Revo 11 is a smaller, lighter boat, it should still be able to easily accommodate most 6 footers and anyone with an inseam length of up to about 32".

Features:
Grab handles are well placed for pedaling and balance on the water if desired (I use them frequently). They're also useful for handling the boat out of the water.
Image

Notice the new scupper inserts in the cargo well that now protect scupper tubes from the effects of rough handling.
Image

Remember the up-down rudder lines whose labels seemed to last about a week? They have been replaced with more durable plastic inserts. The usual (small) rudder comes standard with the Twist N Stow rudder system, but large rudder is available and recommended for sailing and very low speed enhanced directional control.
Image Image

There are new seat pegs this year that twist and lock. One of the pegs on the test boat was a little stiff to install (probably because it's new). Once locked in though, they worked great, holding the seat very securely until released.
Image Image

Drive alignment shaft (mounted on the Drive) and slots (molded in the boat) now make it very easy to put the Drive in correctly -- almost fail-safe!
Image

Styling cues and design elements:
Like the Revo 13, the R11 has a generous sized cargo well and a smaller but equally accessible bow hatch.
Image

Bow length has been shortened by about 8" and the stern section bobbed by approximately 15". Most of this came from the elimination of the Revo 13 rear deck.

The Adventure contributes a fine bow angle that allows the Revo 11 to slip along more quietly than the R13 -- almost as quiet as the Big A itself.

Efficient use of deck space came right out of the book written by the newest Oasis. Can you tell which is which?
Image Image

The R11 has lots of rocker for its length to produce superb turning qualities and responsive bow action in choppy waters.

Hobie's trademark tri-lobed hull has been re-tuned to add buoyancy in the narrow bow section and excellent secondary stability abeam with a very predictable tipping point.

The combined result is attractive, nicely proportioned, highly functional and very efficient. This boat handles like a nautical equivalent to a sports car -- lively and responsive.
Image



Speaking of handling, lets take a look.

The R11 rides through the water unlike any of the other Hobies -- quiet yet responsive, the bow dances over most swells and chop. Not a lot of slapping, pounding, cleaving, no excessive spray kicked up. Freeboard (height above the waterline) is sufficient to keep the occupant relatively dry in most conditions,

Turning ability is much like the Pro Angler -- sensitive but stable. This boat can be lean steered (example -- lean the boat a couple of degrees left to nudge the bow a couple of degrees right) for minor corrections without having to reach for the rudder control. The R11 turns on a dime with either the standard or optional (large) rudder. I still like the larger rudder as an option because it minimizes rudder input over distance and gives improved low speed (1/2 MPH or less) control as it does with all other models.

Stability:
In terms of rolling stability, the R11 is probably closer to the Adventure than the Revo 13. As you can see, the boat is actually stable enough to stand on (not recommended though). Also notice how easy it is to move freely about the cockpit. The mild initial stability gives very good control handling swells encountered from the beam. Secondary stability is excellent, giving plenty of warning prior to reaching the tipping point.
Image Image

Performance:
With Turbofins (and a well tuned Drive), calm water and no tides or currents, I averaged about 4.9 MPH for 2.5 miles, 4.75 miles in an hour and covered 9.1 miles in two hours. The boat is very efficient in the low to mid 4's and just seems to want to keep on going. Sprint speed is about 5.75 to 5.9 MPH.

Wind and chop:
I didn't find any place that the boat didn't feel comfortable -- lake, bay or ocean.
Image Image

Fishing:
Compact length doesn't leave it short in the fishing department. As you can see here, the R11 can haul in a boatload! :wink:
Image

Paddling:
Like all Mirage Drive boats, the R11 was designed for pedaling. Nevertheless, the boat tracks reasonably well with rudder and fins down, with minor corrections again being handled by lean-steering and/or paddling technique Flip the fins up (rudder down) and the bow starts hunting, but control is easily maintained. The rudder also acts as a skeg; so if paddling with the rudder up, the boat becomes directionally promiscuous, requiring good focus to maintain heading.

With the Drive pulled, be sure to have the drivewell plug (standard equipment) installed or there will be sloshing water from the drivewell and potentially into the seat area.

Sailing:
As with all the other Hobie Mirage Drive kayaks, using a sail adds a fun versatile dimension to the boat. With the recommended large rudder, the R11 has good sailing manners -- excellent directional control (no excessive weather helm) and easy to tack (cross into the wind) without pedaling assistance. I was able to get up to 5.0 MPH on a broad reach and 4.7 on a close reach with a moderate breeze and flat seas. Side slip while beating (sailing at a maximum angle upwind) is about 10 to 15 degrees, as one would expect using the Turbofins as a daggerboard.
Image Image

Not surprisingly, the Revo 11 is a bit tender under sail when the breeze stiffens. The Sidekick (outrigger kit) is an excellent option for added stability if desired.

Sailing while pedaling is a great hybrid feature unique to Hobies. You're never left stranded if the wind dies, you can head in any direction (unlike sailing) and of course, you can go most places faster with less effort (or get a workout while sailing) as you like. With a little practice the sail can be put up, taken down and stowed while on the water.
Image

Transport:
The Revo 11's relatively light weight and short length make it a breeze to transport in the back of any pick-up and many vans. Just roll it up, set the bow down on the open tail gate, and shove. It's light enough to ride upside down on most car racks if somehow you can't stuff it in the trunk or back window.
Image Image

Summary:
The Revolution 13 is a hard boat to beat -- it's still probably the best all-around single seat Hobie. But the Revo 11 gives it a big run for the money without trying to emulate it. It's easier to handle, load and transport. It's more nimble and lively and runs a little quieter on the water. It utilizes its space better. The only limitations I see are a slightly slower cruising speed, and mildly reduced user size and height limitations. It fits me great though with lots of room still to grow (hope not) and IMO, it is the most fun Hobie kayak to date!

Excuse me while I go back out and play some more before they make me return the boat!
Image
8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2011 1:29 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue May 04, 2010 4:01 pm
Posts: 429
We have some great posters, and your posts have that great mix of reality combined with actual use in and out of the water.

This report makes me very eager to buy a new Revo 11.

You might recall that I was searching out info on the Outback/Outfitter and Revo back in May.

Your warning about using an Outback/Outfitter in my tidal river with strong San Francisco Bay winds was a good wake up call.

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=35673

After your advice, at that time I thinking about the Revo. My problem would have been transporting it in the bed of my Ridgeline and where and how to store it safely at home.

The Revo 11 appears to be the answer to the tides/wind and getting the yak to and from my Ridgeline. Also, the Revo 11 should fit in the enclosed and lockable storage area of our car port. That will eliminate the need for a cover and storing it outside.

Thanks again for another outstanding report.

I have a couple of questions:

1. Will the Mirage units from our Oasis fit into the Mirage holder of the Revo 11?

2.. Will a seat from my 2009 Oasis fit in the Revo 11, I have installed last year's adjustable pegs on one of our 2009 Oasis seats.

3. Will the larger rudder be helpful in the tidal rivers/wind and in tight conditions casting around docks and going up the river that narrows down or necks of our local lakes?

At this time, I will hold up on ordering the ST Turbo kit. I have friends up here with ST Turbo mirages. So I can borrow one of theirs to see if there is a difference.

Again you are the winner in the RTAHKW award.

RTAHKW = Real Truth About Hobie Kayak Weight versus the fictional weight in their brochures.

Looking forward to buying and using the new Revo 11! :mrgreen:

_________________
2009 Oasis
2012 Freedom Hawk Pathfinder


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2011 1:37 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue May 04, 2010 4:01 pm
Posts: 429
http://i53.tinypic.com/2nss288.jpg

_________________
2009 Oasis
2012 Freedom Hawk Pathfinder


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2011 2:37 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2011 6:21 am
Posts: 141
Wow great write up, thanks for posting it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2011 4:13 pm 
Offline
Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2395
Location: Escondido
GS and Dan thanks for the comments!
Grampa Spey wrote:
1. Will the Mirage units from our Oasis fit into the Mirage holder of the Revo 11?
Yes, any Drive will work with the new boats, just as they have in the past. In fact, I used my old Turbofin unit for all the speed work, as it is set up exactly the way I like it.
Quote:
2.. Will a seat from my 2009 Oasis fit in the Revo 11, I have installed last year's adjustable pegs on one of our 2009 Oasis seats.
There are a couple of ways it will work. For a permanent change, the new seat inserts are a direct replacement for your old twist and lock units. Or, if you want to use your special seat for both boats, then you can remove the factory installed inserts from the boat (large standard screwdriver will do it) and you should be able to use your old plugs directly in the new boat (haven't tried it though).

Best solution is to configure the new seat as you like it and keep the seat with the boat. I leave my seats in the boats at all times, fold them forward and bungee for transport.
Quote:
3. Will the larger rudder be helpful in the tidal rivers/wind and in tight conditions casting around docks and going up the river that narrows down or necks of our local lakes?
Without going into a long explanation, this boat actually turns sharper with the small rudder -- the large rudder serves to control the boat's natural rate of turn more. Yet, the boat responds more urgently to the large rudder and I like that! While out in the ocean I ran into an extensive kelp area and needed to maneuver through it. Everywhere I turned I found more in front of me. With the large rudder I was able to thread through this morass -- love the instantaneous response and quick turning the large rudder provides!
Quote:
At this time, I will hold up on ordering the ST Turbo kit. I have friends up here with ST Turbo mirages. So I can borrow one of theirs to see if there is a difference.
Don't overlook the ST fins. If the Turbos seem too much, the STs are almost as efficient and virtually as easy to push as the standard fins. They are easy to change over and less costly.
Quote:
RTAHKW = Real Truth About Hobie Kayak Weight versus the fictional weight in their brochures.:mrgreen:
:lol: :lol: Think of it this way -- most manufacturers (including Hobie) report the net plastic weight of the basic hull. Anything added to that is not counted. Unlike many manufacturers, Hobie sells their boats complete with rudder system Click N Gos, embedded brass and SS pieces, lots of hatches, etc. These usually account for about 10 to 12 lbs (varies with year and boat model) and this is what you actually have to lift. A lot of people don't think about the fact that most kayaks are sold without many of these features as standard; if added by the purchaser, this additional weight is not added to the specs. So by reporting the dressed weight, people would wonder why Hobie builds heavier boats than everyone else. So think of the reported weights as a comparative value rather than a real value. Hobies do tend to be on the heavy side anyway, not only because of all the gear and gadgets, but also because they need need extra reinforcement in the high stress region in the drivewell area. The cart makes it moot most of the time though. Ironically, I end up helping a lot of folks lift their non-Hobies on and off their vehicles! 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2011 9:00 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2011 10:40 am
Posts: 6
Location: SoCal
Interesting! So it's not likely that if I were to buy a new Revo 13 that it would have the scupper reinforcement or the driveline enhancements added mid cycle year, right?

My dealer also mentioned that there's supposedly another new kayak coming soon; any idea what that would be?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 7:18 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue May 04, 2010 4:01 pm
Posts: 429
1. Good news about the Mirage unit. My Oasis Mirage unit is adjusted for my legs, so I will just transfer it to and from the Oasis and Revo 11. Between trips our Mirage units stay in our home in a cedar chest which holds our yaking gear.

2. Re the seats, I think that I would prefer to transfer my seat from the Oasis to and from the Revo 11. Also, our home, as friends say, is on the edge of surburbia and raw nature. We have all types of critters roaming around at night from Pogo's offspring to racoons, ring tailed cats, foxes, bobcats, feral cats and ?. I have heard bad stories about people leaving yak seats in their yaks with the covers on. Then, they find out that critters used the seats for nesting or what ever. So we keep the seats inside or in the lock box on the Malone trailer, which I hopefully won't need with the Revo 11.

3. I will try my standard Mirage units and take your suggestion re the ST upgrade if I feel that I need to upgrade.

4. Re the rudder, I will not be doing ocean stuff, but I will be using my Revo 11 in some small turning areas. Also, often on return trips, I will be going with/through tidal and wind impacts. After reading your comments about the different rudders, it appears both will have some advantages and disadvantages over each other. How difficult is it to change rudders? Having two choices re rudders might be best for my needs.

Again, thanks for your orginal post and your response to my questions. You have saved me hours of frustrations in living with, transporting and storing my yaks with your how tos and suggestions.

_________________
2009 Oasis
2012 Freedom Hawk Pathfinder


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 11:00 pm 
Offline
Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2395
Location: Escondido
John P. wrote:
... if I were to buy a new Revo 13 that it would have the scupper reinforcement or the driveline enhancements added mid cycle year, right?
I don't really know. Your dealer should have all the scoop regarding the changes for 2012. It would make sense that the Drive mod is done for all the '12 boats already. Otherwise they would have to build 2 versions of the Drive.
Quote:
My dealer also mentioned that there's supposedly another new kayak coming soon; any idea what that would be?
The Quest 11 is the only other new boat that I am aware of (paddling version of the Revo 11 with a skeg).

Grampa Spey wrote:
My Oasis Mirage unit is adjusted for my legs, so I will just transfer it to and from the Oasis and Revo 11.
Remember, the cockpit lengths are not necessarily the same. You may have to adjust the pedal cranks.
Quote:
Re the rudder,...
A lot of folks will be happy with the standard rudder on this boat. Why don't you try it that way first and see how it works for you. The larger rudder is easy to install if you decide to do it later. I'm pretty sure if you switch to the larger rudder you won't ever switch back though. 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 2:48 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 3:55 am
Posts: 103
Location: Dumfries, SW Scotland
Great write-up, thanks. Sounds a very interesting boat. I've always liked the look of the Adventure, but I'm doubtful about whether I could manage the weight. Revo 11 might be a better answer for me.

It would be good to see pictures of the Revo 11 with the SideKick kit fitted. I know of someone with a Sport plus sail, and he fitted his Sidekicks forward, level with the mast. He remarked that, if paddling, he has to modify his stroke a bit to avoid the outriggers. Since I don't want to sail, I thought the best place for the Sidekicks would be behind the seat, closer to the centre of gravity of boat plus paddler. His reply to this was,
Quote:
On the Hobie Sport that I have, if you try to fit them aft of the seat, the fittings that hold them to the hull end up being in exactly the same spot as the buttons on the arms to adjust the position (high, mid, low).

The Revo 11 is only half an inch narrower than the Sport - is the same problem likely to arise? Or is there more flexibility in where you fit the Sidekicks than the Sport owner thinks?

Mary


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 10:17 pm 
Offline
Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2395
Location: Escondido
Mary, I don't think you need to worry about it. First of all, the Revo 11 is about the same shape and width as the Revo 13 behind the seat [see the overlay (first picture) at the top of my post] and I've heard of no issues with mounting the Sidekick on the Revo 13. Look closely at the Sport in a Hobie brochure and compare the cargo well "rail" with the Revo 13, and you'll see the Sport has far fewer options The width of the boat is not important -- just the rails.

Second, if the Sport owner was clever, he would have mounted a platform (usually a wood strip) across the cargo well where he wanted to place the Sidekick. Then he could mount the Sidekick directly to the platform, placing the mounting brackets where ever he liked. :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 3:14 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 3:55 am
Posts: 103
Location: Dumfries, SW Scotland
Thanks, Roadrunner, that makes sense, and is reassuring. I need to remind myself that, though the Revo 11 is a "short" boat compared to the sea kayak I paddle, it's still 2 foot longer than the "minimalist" Sport, and is bound to have more options.

Mary


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 7:15 pm 
Offline
Hobie Team Member

Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 6:36 pm
Posts: 43
Location: Sweeny, Texas
Great write-up. I got to try the Revo 11 at the OR show and was impressed. I went out after the wind had increased. This is a sweeeeeeeeet little craft.

Also learned SUP's are not my cup of tea. I think my wife got some great pictures of me in the water.

_________________
Image

Quit Wishin, Go Fishin and Take a Kid with You


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 9:39 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Fri May 06, 2011 10:04 am
Posts: 16
This is a superb review Roadrunner!

I have a revo 13 but you really made me want to get an 11. Thanks for sharing and taking the time to put that review together.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 5:29 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
Posts: 8979
Location: Oceanside, California
John P. wrote:
... if I were to buy a new Revo 13 that it would have the scupper reinforcement or the driveline enhancements added mid cycle year, right?


Quote:
I don't really know. Your dealer should have all the scoop regarding the changes for 2012. It would make sense that the Drive mod is done for all the '12 boats already. Otherwise they would have to build 2 versions of the Drive.


Drive alignment is a 2012 model year change across the board. Scupper reinforcement is a rolling change. Not sure of the schedule of which boats will get it when, but may take awhile.

_________________
Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Hobie Cat USA


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 9:57 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 5:17 pm
Posts: 10
So, if I were to get a Revo, why would I pick the 13 over the 11?


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 77 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group