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PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 6:44 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:37 pm
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Hey All:
before we start this thread, may I ask that anyone who lives on other parts of the globe, start their own thread along the same line so there will be no confusion. (ty)
I've lived close to the central part of the east coast of Vancouver Island, Canada for almost 4 years. I have noticed a number of weather changes in that time that I can only consider as abnormal on a increasingly curved graph line over the last few years.

1) The average Winter tides (combined with gale force winds), have risen every year on the average max water level by 3 inches per year. As I also rent foreshore land from the Gov, that has meant that my seawall has now shrunk by 12 inches. This has caused me to replace the staircase from my fence into a 3 foot ramp for beach accessability. In the 20 year history of this house, this has never happened before.

2) Larger amounts of rocks (of increasing diameter) have been washed up on shore as have large logs in the 50 to 100 foot range. (Logging in BC is almost a non-industry. The huge log booms of 2 decades ago are now almost all gone)

3) Abnormal temperature gradients have been experienced in the spring and early summer of this region. I use my electricity bill as a benchmark. Last June I payed 80% of what I payed in December of 2010. (Highly abnormal, June used to be 60% of December, in previous years)

No this is not a gripe fest about the weather, I only ask these questions to those who live close to the Pacific from Alaska to South CA (and beyond). Maybe if we combined observations from our own shore front homes, we could see patterns based on the scientific methods of weather observations. El Nino, El Nina, or maybe the rapid temp changes in the Arctic that may bite us all where the Sun doesn't shine...

Thanks for reading
Fred

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 7:45 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 11:18 am
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Location: Texas
Don't know bout the rest of the world but central Texas and of all of Texas is in a major drought. It was much hotter than normal this summer, we have and are having way too many wildfires and the weather has just been sucking it. The experts claim another 9 years of drought - That really sucks! If that plays out - we will have no lakes with water and serious water issues. Hope the experts are wrong and we get some cut-off lows or hurricanes to solve out these water issues.

Oh well I did not start another thread but can if you want... or I can delete this too! LOL.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 10:24 pm 
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
No Man
I really appreciate the input as it is related in a way even though we live a long ways apart.
When I first started learning about global warming, the warming part were all that seemed to matter.
Yet where you live, and where I live, it seems that the normal climate has gone into overdrive.
In Texas it gets drier, on the West Coast it gets colder and wetter.
If you can look back into the dirty thirties (US). The climate went nuts as dust storms became so severe that ppl couldn't breathe. It had a lot to do with a drought that literally tore the top layer of topsoil off the central part of North America and redistributed all over the Globe.
All I can offer you is to try to find a way to conserve water and store it underground at all possible costs. The Wild Fires will continue as long as there is fuel. Once the fuel is gone, the only way to survive is to use the water that has been stored.
In my part of this Continent, the weather will just get colder, wetter and more severe. I guess, I'm beginning to understand what real Global Warming is all about.....
In truth, it should have been properly named as Global Severe Climatic Change.

Be well
Fred

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 6:38 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 3:57 am
Posts: 138
Location: Fairfax, CA USA
I've along the coast or the shore of San Francisco bay nearly all my life (35 of 45).
I'm in the rain shadow of Mt Tamalpais now for the last 7 years.
Summers have cooled off in the last 5, but we get less fog in late afternoons.
Earlier winter storms (we just got our first good dump), and later rain as well- into June last year.
Each year of the last few we have had a gap in storms in Jan or Feb- long gap, warm temps, then back to the deluge. That gap used to come around thanksgiving (even historically you can see the gap)

we have a very regular cyclic rainfall pattern over large scales, and now it looks to be changing- looking more similar to the late 1800's
good chart here: http://www.climatestations.com/images/s ... sfprcp.gif


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 6:46 am 
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Location: Texas
Fred,

Exactly.

IMO: This weather trend really sucks. I live out in the country and have my own well. If drought continues I run out of water and so does everybody else out here. I can probably get water trucked in at a very steep price, I can only do that for a short period then would have to move I suppose. I hope it does not come to that. There is definitely weather changes going on.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 3:03 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 19, 2008 4:07 pm
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Location: CLEARWATER, MN
The Central Pacific Islands are experiencing some of the severest droughts in their history. New Zealand has been flying in reverse osmosis machines and fuel for them. Some islands are now down to only days of fresh water left. Trees along the shorelines are dying as salt water migrates into the beaches. At the same time, Australia has had some really bad flooding. The La Nina winds are so strong this year that moist air is being blown completely to the west in the Pacific, dropping rain on East Asia.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2011 6:14 pm 
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Never thought it has gotten that far but it makes sense as the most sensitive areas will be in Central Southern Pacific Islands where fresh water is a dream or just a trickle off any hill that can capture morning dew and gather it.
Some of the most innovative areas are the west coast of Africa where they have put down 'dew fences' to collect the fog that rolls in, in the morning.
As the temp gradient is insane there, by mid morning the fog has evaporated...
(They are in the wind shadow from North Africa which sends most of the moisture across the Atlantic to America.

That could change....

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