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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 9:47 pm 
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Location: Slippery Rock, PA
I have had an Adventure Island for the last 5 years. I am thinking about moving into a different sailing boat. The Island is great fun, but pretty wet sailing. I was looking at the Bravo. I need to stay around 200 pounds for transporting. Also the Island had lots of parts. It would be nice to cut down on the parts. :) Could the Bravo be transported on a pickup bed carrier, or does it have to be trailered. And any other suggestions to move into from the Island??
Thanks!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 6:53 am 
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Location: Abaco, Bahamas
Never been on an Adventure, but the Bravo is great fun. It is also a fairly wet boat, but has very few parts to deal with. Nice sailing in winds up to 15-18 mph, fun, but a challenge (for me) above 20 mph. Had it out yesterday in 25-28. Knocked down twice in 3 hrs, but had a blast. It can be hauled easily in a full-sized pickup and probably in a small pickup with a little effort. I built a small wooden trailer ($60) for mine that I pull a couple of hundred yards to the beach with my golf cart. Easy for one person to launch and reload (I'm 72); in less than 5 min you are in the water and sailing.
Good luck.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 8:06 am 
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Thanks, that gives me a better idea of the Bravo. The local Hobie Dealer has a Bravo that we could possibly try out. The water around here doesn't get much warmer than 65, at best, so wet sailing can be fun, but chilly!! We also take it to Virginia Beach, where the water is much, much, warmer. The moving around and hauling is the biggest problem. I do love the the Adventure Island though!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 8:29 am 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
To the best of my knowledge, I'm the only active member on the forum to have made the switch from an Adventure Island to a Bravo.

I'm glad I switched!

Will you be? Well that depends on a LOT of things.

I switched because I was sailing my AI a lot, and we had just started a family, so my wife wasn't coming out kayaking on her Revolution all that much, meaning I wasn't kayaking with her on the Adventure.

We decided to one day get an Oasis, so that we could kayak together, and my plan was to one day get a Wave or Getaway. I saw a Bravo for CHEAP, and I'm REALLY glad that I bought it at this stage in my life.

The ease of rigging is incredible. People are shocked that you can have this at the water's edge and be sailing in 2 minutes. The AI wasn't difficult to rig, but having the tramps, and all the pieces and parts took a little bit of time. I realize that most boats take a lot longer, but you really notice the lack of rigging time, even moving from the AI to the Bravo.

As far as it being drier, it is. You're higher off the water, and you get raised away from it when you sail. Even without flying a hull, you're up considerably higher than an AI, or even other competitive boats like Laser.

It's much more stable than I had imagined it would be. I suppose that compared to an H16, it's not, but compared to anything in its class, it's surprisingly stable. Very safe feeling, just like the AI was. I moved from the AI because I wanted a boat that was a little more able to tip, something with more speed, and a higher risk/reward sailing experience. Something that was simple, but still required some skill. I'm LOVING the Bravo for that. It's a lot of fun to fly a hull, but easy to keep level if you need to. Even when you push it too far and tip, you don't get thrown from the boat, you can almost always just casually hang on to the boat, and keep from falling in. With the rudder being in the centre, you can feel when it leaves the water. If it does, you're going over, but you've got a split second where you notice that, and you'll have time to hang on. Having said that, once you get used to it, you know where the point of no return is, and the boat is amazingly forgiving, you can bring it right to the brink, and bring it back again, without too much trouble. I only tip it when I'm really trying to ride that edge. And I find that to be fun. That's something that I couldn't do on the AI... there was no "edge" :)

Things I miss?

The versatility. That mirage drive is wonderful! Being 200 metres from shore, running out of wind in the evening, having to tack against the wind to get there, you really forget how easily that would have been done in the AI. Having said that, the Bravo moves in just a BREATH of wind. That's the one thing that surprised me. You need nothing to actually move. Getting stuck out on a lake is just so unlikely to happen. I don't often carry a paddle, but one nice thing to do is to semi raise the rudder, and swing it back and forth like a flipper. The boat is light enough, that when you run out of wind, that can move you the short distance that you may need to go.

I did overnight camping trips on the AI, and I'm considering it on the Bravo, but obviously the AI is a far superior boat to take into the wilderness and go unsupported.

One thing that you should be prepared for though, (and I love this about the boat) is that sailing the Bravo is a much more athletic thing to do that sailing the AI. You'll need to hike out and use your body to sail. The AI made you feel like a passenger, this will make you feel like a sailor! It's great. But you're not going to do 9 hour trips on the Bravo the way some do on the AI.

Finally, I think the Bravo is one of the most underrated boats in the Hobie lineup. You don't see it talked about here very much because it's just so reliable. People don't spend time fixing it, there aren't questions about rigging, or options, you just sail it. For me, that's perfect.

One day, I'll move up to a Wave or a Getaway (when my kids are old enough to come with me, and my wife will be able to come more often) but for now, the Bravo is a great solo sailing boat, with the capability to take two people.

I love there performance, I love the simplicity, and the durability.

As far as fitting it in a pickup. I think it "could" be done. It's 12 feet long, so you'll be hanging it out the end. I trailer it behind my 4 cylinder car, and it's no problem. I've never had to think about moving it into a pick up, but it's light and easy to lift, and it's actually less awkward to lift because of the placement of the handles (don't forget the molded in handles just under the front of the boat by the hatch!)

I get better mileage towing the Bravo, than I did by putting the AI on the roof. Wind resistance is obviously a factor, more than weight.

If you have ANY questions, I'd be happy to answer them for you. I'll keep an eye on this thread.

I have a few videos which I can link to this thread if you want. (I've posted them in the Bravo section before, so you may have seen them before)

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 9:46 am 
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Location: Slippery Rock, PA
Wow! You are the person to talk to!!! Funny, my husband had a Revolution, which he sold last year. He has a back issue and the peddles were impossible. I really like sailing!!! It would be fun to have an edge! And I would also like to take a passenger with me. We spend a month in Va Beach in the summer and I end up having fun all by myself. It would be nice to have fun with someone else also! We aren't large people...
We pull a camper with our toys in the back of and on top of our truck. We have two Ocean Kayaks and mountain bikes. We need to stay less than 300 pounds and need to put whatever we get up on the rack. If we were to go locally, and that is something we would do more of if we can sail together, we could pull it on a trailer, or put it in the back of our Dodge Ram.
Less parts would be soooo great! I have forgotten my Dagger board, dropped it into a lake, and left it on shore......simplicity is something I liked about the Bravo. I would love to trade even for one, but not sure that is possible???
Thank-you so much, and videos would be fantastic!!!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 11:05 am 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Here's a video of me tipping it. You can see that I've past the point of no return when I drop my sail line, but you can also see how much time you have to hang on to the boat, before the sail lands in the water. I could have saved the boat here many times by steering out of it, but I was just out on a fun day seeing what the boat would do.



This video just gives you a sense of the speed that the Bravo moves at.



The final video is me goofing around. I was making gybes where I'd move late to the opposite side, and it would get the opposite hull up in the air, and then I'd jump across, and the boat would come down, while also zipping forward. Problem is... if you move a bit too late, you get thrown out. I find this video a little funny, but if you want you can ignore the poor sailing than it's just another video showing how the boat moves along.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 5:33 pm 
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Location: Slippery Rock, PA
thanks! That looks like a really fun boat!!! I particularly enjoyed the smiles on your face as you went into the water!!! We will try one out as soon as the weather permits here in Western PA. You live someplace with warm water???


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 7:52 pm 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Really warm. A place called Canada. :D

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 8:00 pm 
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Location: Slippery Rock, PA
You are one hardy guy!!! We are in Pennsylvania where the water doesn't get much above 65. I do most of my sailing with the AI on the Chesapeake Bay where the water is warm!!!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 9:09 pm 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Canadian sailors have a little secret. Wet suit!! I have a few different versions. The videos were taken on a cooler summer day, and I had a wetsuit vest on over my shirt, and wetsuit shorts under my shorts. There aren't many days where I go without the shorts, but the vest depends on the body of water. If I'm on Lake Ontario, it's mandatory! I put the vest over my shirt, so that I can layer it off if it gets hot. The reefing sail is great for taking a quick break for a snack, drink, or to layer your clothes up or down.

With a full wetsuit, gloves, boots, and sailing jacket, I can usually go in the fall until the air temperature is down to about 8-10 Celsius. (46-50 Fahrenheit). The spring is worse because the air temperature is good, but the water stays cold for a couple months. A bit tougher to dress for.

We dress for safety here, as much as for comfort!

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:27 am 
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Location: Slippery Rock, PA
The best part of our "toys" is all the equipment we have to buy!!! New toys, new equipment.....
There is an event the beginning of May here, where Wind and Water Boatworks will take out a whole lot of their different boats to a local Lake and let people try them for free. We got to try the Revolution and Island before we bought them. We helped out one year demonstrating the Hobie's. Lots of fun. This year we have asked him to bring a Bravo and also a Sunfish. I like the Bravo, but it may still be a bit wet. How is it for two adults? I see videos with one adult and then videos with two children. We are not huge people, but it does appear one has to move around a bit on the boat. Sometimes quicker than others :)
Thanks again!!!!


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 11:35 am 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
janetandfred wrote:
... This year we have asked him to bring a Bravo and also a Sunfish. I like the Bravo, but it may still be a bit wet. How is it for two adults?...


The Bravo isn't really wet, that's only if you're really moving that your feet get wet from the splashes. (or if you tip... then you get wet!!) It's light years better than the Adventure Island if you want to stay dry. The Sunfish would only be drier because it's slower. In most conditions with waves and wind, I would assume that the height out of the water would keep you drier on the Bravo than in a Sunfish, but I've only sailed alongside a Sunfish in my Bravo, never solo'd one in recent memory.

I've moved away from Lake Ontario, and will spend this summer sailing on a smaller lake in the area. They have a small boat sailing club with lots of Sunfish. The one benefit that the Sunfish might have is it's ability to turn on a dime. I could be wrong, and I'll confirm it this summer, but I think the Sunfish can rotate around it's centerboard easier than the Bravo can rotate it's two hulls. Generally, I can get the Bravo spun around pretty quickly, but the physics of it, makes me think that the Sunfish might have a slightly smaller "turning circle"

The Bravo is fine with two people. A bit harder to fly a hull, and a bit slower, but also more stable again. I can't see how the Bravo would be slower with two people than a Sunfish is with one. I'm about 170 lbs, and my wife is about 125 lbs. We have no trouble moving at a good pace.

In lighter winds I'll set the second person in the center of the boat facing backwards with their back just aft of the front hatch, and their legs stretched comfortably down the centre of the boat. It's a nice comfortable reclined position and allows the passenger to just enjoy the ride, without having to move. It's also a great place to sun tan! When the wind picks up, I'll get the second person to sit beside me and sail as normal, but even then, adding some weight to the centre of the boat makes it extremely stable.

The Sunfish Manufacturers site http://na.laserperformance.com/sunfish/specs lists "Optimal weight" of it's sailor and crew as just 140 lbs. Hobie lists the Bravo's "Maximum weight" capacity as 400 lbs. I'd have to guess that the Bravo's going to lose less performance with 300 lbs of people than a Sunfish would.

Besides, you can't buy a Sunfish! The "catamaran" people on this site will just shake their heads! :)

I always say, you don't find a lot of catamaran sailors wishing for a Sunfish, but you DO find a lot of Sunfish sailors wishing for a Catamaran! :)

The Bravo is perhaps even more simple than the Sunfish, which has to be the Sunfish's strongest selling feature, but the Bravo is probably more stable, definitely faster, and better suited to carry more weight. Yes, it's a bit heavier, but only about 20 lbs when you compare hull weight. People are often surprised to find out that the Bravo is less than 4 inches wider than the Sunfish, and also nearly two feet shorter. It's very compact and easy to store.

Don't worry... I'll help talk you out of that Sunfish! :)

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 2:27 pm 
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Location: Slippery Rock, PA
Very good information! That's the kind of things I need to hear. I really want the Bravo, but my Hubby thinks the Sunfish would be less physical for me. :o What is he talking about????? We should get to try both of them at the Lake, which will be nice. When we bought the Revolution and AI, we thought we wanted something else. As soon as I got out of the AI, I knew that was what I wanted! I do love it, but for many reasons, want to try something else. Simplicity is one of those reasons. We move the AI and two ocean kayaks a lot at the beach. We have the big balloon Wheeleze tires. But, my Macho Hubby thinks he has to do all the heavy work, silly boy! I can move the AI, but it is a struggle. Then we have to take all the parts back and forth with us on a daily basis along with the ocean kayaks. The AI stays chained up at the beach. Certainly nothing to whine about, a month at the beach is heaven! Camp Hosting is a great way to spend a summer. We used to do three months, but have cut back to just one month. We have many folks that venture down from Canada to First Landing State Park. Sometimes English is a second language on the beach.
I am soooo ready to get any of the kayaks out onto the water! We live right on a creek, but it is still much too cold even with the right gear. :)
Thanks again!!!


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 2:55 pm 
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Location: Franklin Lakes, NJ
Been sailing my Bravo here in North NJ all winter and just wear sailing shorts and dingy boots for launching. I usually stay out for a hour or so. Key to winter sailing is to not be too aggressive, keep the bow out from going under on a reach and in the heavier puffs ease the sheet and stick it into the wind. Could not do this on a Sunfish or Laser as they are much wetter and tippier boats. And my lake is small 3/4x1/2 miles.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:49 am 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
janetandfred wrote:
... I really want the Bravo, but my Hubby thinks the Sunfish would be less physical for me...


Your husband isn't wrong. The Bravo is the more physical boat to sail. But that doesn't mean that you can't sail it in a less physical way. As "frankc1200" says, he sails in frigid water! You have to avoid capsizing in those conditions. The boat can be sailed in a relaxing manner, and with the roller furling sail, you can always dial back the athleticism if the winds pick up, and you're not in the mood to fight them.

That's what I like the most about the Bravo, it's great for a relaxing sail, but you have the option of higher performance. The Sunfish is always going to be, just a relaxing sail.

You also don't NEED to be athletic to sail the Bravo at a more fun pace than a Sunfish. These are all things you'll look for and notice when you sail them both back to back.

Let us know how it goes!

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