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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2011 10:53 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2003 6:10 pm
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Location: Folsom, CA
What is the proper length for the jib sheet? In the assembly instuctions it says 36' in the parts manual it says 45'?... but I'd like to run the longest jib sheet fairleads possible... any idea what that length would be? (manual says 2'6") but want to go the max fairlead length and still be able to sheet in all the way.

Also I seam to recall that the mast rotator was moved to the the boom, or is my memory failing me? If it's still on the tramp are you guys using the short pvc "strut" to keep it off the tramp (page 8, assembly instructions)? I do not recall ever using this little strut...?

Thanks, I know, a lot of questions trying to get this boat rigged :-)

Thx, Brian


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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2011 2:17 pm 
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Location: Storm Lake, IA
NAHCA555 wrote:
What is the proper length for the jib sheet? In the assembly instuctions it says 36' in the parts manual it says 45'?.

We got a new 45' sheet last year and it was way to long. I'm guessing we cut off 10' so 36' sounds right. But its much easier to cut some off then to add some
Don't know about the fair leads mine are about 10" from the sail to the block.
NAHCA555 wrote:
using the short pvc "strut" to keep it off the tramp

Its run through the tramp and use the PVC to keep it from rubbing the tramp and to keep it from flipping up from the pressure of the positive mast rotation bungees.


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PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2011 6:47 pm 
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hobieandy wrote:
NAHCA555 wrote:
NAHCA555 wrote:
using the short pvc "strut" to keep it off the tramp

Its run through the tramp and use the PVC to keep it from rubbing the tramp and to keep it from flipping up from the pressure of the positive mast rotation bungees.

BTW, that little strut has a real name.

It's a Wrinklie Tube. Named for the guy who came up with the idea.


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PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2011 7:53 pm 
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Location: Storm Lake, IA
MBounds wrote:
It's a Wrinklie Tube

Sounds kind of gross!!


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PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2011 11:32 pm 
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Location: Folsom, CA
I swear, on my early H-20 we moved it back to the boom... is nobody running the rotator on the boom?

Pro's... con's? suggestions?


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PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 7:28 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2005 12:55 am
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Location: Rapid City, South Dakota
NAHCA555 wrote:
I swear, on my early H-20 we moved it back to the boom... is nobody running the rotator on the boom?

Pro's... con's? suggestions?


Pros are that you can adjust the mast rotation from the wire/leaning out on the hull. If you move it to the boom, its going to get in the way of the downhaul, and you will have to get to the boom to adjust it, not always easy when flying a hull. All of the lines for it run under the tramp.

_________________
1992 Hobie Cat 18 #16943
Hobie Fleet 198, Rapid City, SD


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PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 9:29 am 
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Location: Jersey Shore
When I raced a 20, we almost never adjusted the mast rotation from the wire. The crew is way too busy working the downhaul, the jib, and collecting mainsheet tail to worry about mast rotation. The problem with the stock system is that it has a tendency to get pulled all to one side making adjustment impossible. It's also in an uncomfortable position for making adjustments while on the tramp (which is where adjustments are most commonly made anyway). And it's another line adding to the congestion on an already crowded tramp.

I ended up moving the adjustment for the mast rotator to the boom. I did so without actually moving the wishbone location on the mast. I tied off a pulley to the tramp grommet and set it up so that the cleat on the top of the boom (for the stock postitive mast rotator) was used for mast rotation adjustment. The rotation adjustment line was run up inside the mast luff track. It took a little longer to rig, but it worked well and I used the system up until we sold the boat.

sm


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PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 9:52 pm 
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Location: Folsom, CA
SRM:

Thanks, kinda my thoughts, the crew area is already way over loaded with "stuff"... I do think we moved it to the boom back then, but your idea is interesting, I will take a look and see if I can duplicate it...

Thx!

B


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 6:10 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 07, 2006 8:00 am
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Location: Northern VA
We did adjust it from the wire once in a while. When you are max downhauled and traveled out and nothing left to do, it does help for the crew to bend their knees, come part way in, and pull on more rotator. They can reach it still hooked up from the edge of the tramp vs having to get unhooked to reach the boom. Don't need to run it all the way out to the trap like the downhaul line. Definitely helps in 25+ :-) Once everything is maxed out upwind, the crew is along for the ride anyway, unless they are working the mainsheet or traveler.


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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 2:05 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 12:15 am
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Location: Kaneohe, Hawaii
I believe the wrinklie tube Matt refered to was originally designed by Alan Egusa as part of a positive mast rotation. It's in an old black, green and white hotline.
Only need the PVC tube and positive mast rotator if you sail in light choppy lakes. If it's windy, no need. Just don't have your rig to tight or you can't rotate the mast to 90 anyway.
Follow the Hobie set-up manual and if you want an upgrade put on the cascading downhaul, then most importantly, get your butt out on the water and get some cockpit time which is more important than a barberhauler or mast rotator.
Take notes on how the boat is set-up and the wind, water and crew weight, build your tuning book so you know what works best. After some time find a tuning partner on another 20 and dial her in.


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