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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 11:00 pm 
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Location: Northern VA
Hello to all. I have been lurking for a couple of months as I pondered whether to buy a TI (or possibly an Oasis, I always wanted the TI but the $$$ were tough to handle) . While on vacation the opportunity to get good deal on a new (2010 demo) TI made the decision for me :D . The dealer had purchased it, never assembled it, and is now retiring. So I bought it in the boxes/bubble wrap and I have now mostly gotten it together.

Questions:
1) Rigging the lines: both ends of the mainsheet line are tied back around itself so that they can slide up and down the line (I don't know the name of the knot they use, but it looks a little like a hang man's knot in that it loops around the the line maybe 10 times or so). Am I supposed to leave the ends tied like that, or untie the ends? I know I've read a tip here about tying the furling line to the mainsheet line for rear sailing, so that sounds like "untie". But those knots are so elaborate, it seems like a lot of effort to tie them that way if the end user is just supposed to untie them.

2) After installing the new rudder, I noticed that the two tiller handles are not aligned, i.e. if one is pointing straight forward, the other is about an 1" to the right. Can this be fixed? If so, how?

3) Keeping with the rudder, it easily turns to the left (the rudder's left) all the way until it bumps the hull, but turning to the right meets resistance about 1-2" from the hull. I have to hold the tiller handle to keep the rudder there. Is this normal? If not, any ideas what the fix would be?

4) Aside from the assembly described in the manual, are there any areas I should check that are common problems? (It seems like I've read that some bolts can be too loose, maybe other things I need to check out, but I don't recall what they were).

Last, but not least, the dealer told me it was a 2011 demo, but a sticker on the side near the serial number has 6/30/2010 on it (I assume the manufacture date). The serial number seems to end with "10" however there is a line through the "0", like a "1", so I don't really know if it is a 2010 or 2011 model.

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Bob

2010 Golden Papaya TI


Last edited by BCinDC on Mon Jun 11, 2012 12:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 9:49 am 
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Location: Maui, Hawaii
I'll try to help. Sounds like a 2010. Hobie puts slashes through the zero's. Should still come with the Hobie 2 year warranty. Hopefully it was well taken care of, and you got a great deal on it.

On the sheet lines, it's now your boat, so tie or untie what YOU want. I like some kind of knot to stop the line from going through the cleat if it ever gets away from you while sailing, and I DO tie a loop to tie the reefing line to the sheet-line, sailing from the front or the back.

The tiller handles are tied together in the hull with a line. If the line is a little too long you could disconnect one end and add a single knot to "eat" some line. if it's too short, that could be a problem.

On the rudder turning, you can adjust the lines at the rudder by loosening the bolts and tightening the lines to even the steering. Pick what you consider strait on a tiller handle then adjust the rudder to be strait. If the turning one side verses the other is still off, you'll need to look inside to see if something is catching, or causing resistance to full motion.

I always check and tighten everything on a new boat, except the cleat screws. :)

Also, check how much water you take in the hull over a 3-4 hour sail in choppy conditions (water over the hatches often), and do a leak test if you get more that a few cups. (I use vacuum cleaner exhaust into the larger drain hole, using soapy water all over to look for bubbles).

Any questions, ask away, or PM or email.

Most of all, enjoy your new Island! :D

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http://KayakingBob.com - - - - - Hobie Island Sailing since 2006 - - - - - 2011 & 2012 Hobie AIs and a 2012 TI


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 10:09 am 
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The knot that you're describing is just something that assembly does to keep everything safe in shipping - undo the knots, they won't allow you to rig the sail if they are left in.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 12:01 pm 
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Location: Northern VA
KayakingBob wrote:
I'll try to help. Sounds like a 2010. Hobie puts slashes through the zero's. Should still come with the Hobie 2 year warranty. Hopefully it was well taken care of, and you got a great deal on it.

Thanks for the quick response :)

It's actually brand new; I got it in the boxes, so it's in great shape. And, I'm pretty sure you are right about it being a 2010. The 2011's have the twist and lock seat mounts (mine does not), right?

Are there any changes from 2011 to present that can and should be made ? I know I've read about V-brace clunking that seems to be, at least in part, related to the mounting bolt at the bottom. I see Hobie sells a new improved bolt there, is that worth replacing in advance?
Quote:
The tiller handles are tied together in the hull with a line. If the line is a little too long you could disconnect one end and add a single knot to "eat" some line. if it's too short, that could be a problem.

So, if I understand correctly, there is a line between the two tillers which, if shortened or lengthened, could synchronize the direction of the two tillers?
Quote:

On the rudder turning, you can adjust the lines at the rudder by loosening the bolts and tightening the lines to even the steering. Pick what you consider strait on a tiller handle then adjust the rudder to be strait.

I tried this is, and unfortunately after the 3 or 4 stab at it, the lock nut stripped out the molded rudder hole (honestly, counting on a plastic part to hold a nut is a weak design since I gather these cables need periodic adjustment). I guess I'm going to get some longer SS bolts, nuts and some large washers to bypass the molded nut holding feature.
Quote:
If the turning one side verses the other is still off, you'll need to look inside to see if something is catching, or causing resistance to full motion.

I think I do need to check out the lines inside, as there is some springy resistance the last inch or two when the rudder turns to the right. Maybe a knot is catching on another line
Quote:
I always check and tighten everything on a new boat, except the cleat screws. :)

Also, check how much water you take in the hull over a 3-4 hour sail in choppy conditions (water over the hatches often), and do a leak test if you get more that a few cups. (I use vacuum cleaner exhaust into the larger drain hole, using soapy water all over to look for bubbles).

Will do!

Right now, I'm working on how to get it to, and into, the water as I don't have a trailer or a suitable cart. I went to the water (but not in) yesterday after I found that my old canoe trailer did not work well as a temporary cart (poor planning; I put everything on the roof of my Suburban before I thought to check the cart :oops: ).

BTW, Your spray skirts are on my to-do/to-buy list; I'm sure my wife & daughters (aka, front seat passengers) will appreciate them.

Thanks for all the help. I can't wait to actually use my TI.

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Bob

2010 Golden Papaya TI


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 12:24 pm 
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Jbernier wrote:
The knot that you're describing is just something that assembly does to keep everything safe in shipping - undo the knots, they won't allow you to rig the sail if they are left in.


They look so darn professional, it seems wrong to take them out :D (though I struggled to wrap my brain around how I would sail with them in).

Thanks.

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Bob

2010 Golden Papaya TI


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 3:28 pm 
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What about a flatbed trailer that you can renovate to fit your needs?


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 4:39 pm 
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BCinDC wrote:
The 2011's have the twist and lock seat mounts (mine does not), right?
Yes, that's what I understand.

BCinDC wrote:
Are there any changes from 2011 to present that can and should be made ? I know I've read about V-brace clunking that seems to be, at least in part, related to the mounting bolt at the bottom. I see Hobie sells a new improved bolt there, is that worth replacing in advance?
I wouldn't bother, unless you are going to be doing expedition type trips on it. If it breaks, Hobie should cover the replacement part under warranty. Not many break (but mine did :shock: ).

Does yours still have the twist-n-stow rudder? If so, there's a free heavy strait up/down rudder upgrade. Ask your dealer. They should have gotten it from Hobie already.

BCinDC wrote:
I understand correctly, there is a line between the two tillers which, if shortened or lengthened, could synchronize the direction of the two tillers?
Yes

BCinDC wrote:
I guess I'm going to get some longer SS bolts, nuts and some large washers to bypass the molded nut holding feature.
Should work well.

BCinDC wrote:
I think I do need to check out the lines inside, as there is some springy resistance the last inch or two when the rudder turns to the right. Maybe a knot is catching on another line
Common, and easy to fix. Move one of the knots further up or down one like to they don't overlap.

BCinDC wrote:
BTW, Your spray skirts are on my to-do/to-buy list; I'm sure my wife & daughters (aka, front seat passengers) will appreciate them.
Dee says to remind them they make good Fathers Day presents too! (They buy them for you, but are the ones to enjoy them) :)

Where are you located?

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 5:08 pm 
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KayakingBob wrote:
Does yours still have the twist-n-stow rudder? If so, there's a free heavy strait up/down rudder upgrade. Ask your dealer. They should have gotten it from Hobie already.

I did get the new rudder and he also through in the tramps, which were near the top of my "to buy" list.
Quote:
Dee says to remind them they make good Fathers Day presents too! (They buy them for you, but are the ones to enjoy them) :)

Where are you located?


Well, if I do that, that might imply the boat is "mine" rather than "ours". That's a slippery slope :lol: (plus, just getting the boat seems like a pretty good Father's Day gift). I suspect I'll be buying them pretty soon, but right now I need to get it on water, learn a little about how this sailing business works :)

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Bob

2010 Golden Papaya TI


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 5:21 pm 
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laurie wrote:
What about a flatbed trailer that you can renovate to fit your needs?

I'm looking at all options now. Nothing on Craigslist looks suitable, but I've been looking pretty hard at the little 40"x48" Harbor Freight trailer as a starting point. I bought a 4'x8' utility trailer (not HF) that I turned into my camping trailer a few years ago. I put my 16' canoe on top of that when we camp (I bought a much longer 2x3 steel box tube to extend the tongue; I would do the same for the HF trailer). But, it stays full of camping gear under our deck (no garage), so I'd need as small a trailer footprint as I can get away with since I'm running out of back yard.

I found a good thread showing the use of the cradles for car topping. Though a heavy lift (and my "car" is a Suburban, so it's a long lift), with the cradles I would no longer need to run a dozen straps (I exaggerate slightly) to hold everything on, which was really the time consuming part of car topping for me. I may try this first, then if I'm not happy with it, I can use the cradles on the trailer.

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Bob

2010 Golden Papaya TI


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 9:35 am 
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Jbernier wrote:
The knot that you're describing is just something that assembly does to keep everything safe in shipping - undo the knots, they won't allow you to rig the sail if they are left in.



The Tandem Island was my first "sailboat" and this caused me immense trouble. The knots looked so much like they belonged there, and there was no mention of it in the instruction manual, so I sailed with them for two months before I learned enough to decide that it didn't feel right. So I made a post on here and the responses verified what you just said. I couldn't have been the only one... I suggest you add something about this in the instruction manual! Save the newbies like me some heart ache :)


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 12:33 pm 
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DaytonaJoe wrote:
Jbernier wrote:
The knot that you're describing is just something that assembly does to keep everything safe in shipping - undo the knots, they won't allow you to rig the sail if they are left in.



The Tandem Island was my first "sailboat" and this caused me immense trouble. The knots looked so much like they belonged there, and there was no mention of it in the instruction manual, so I sailed with them for two months before I learned enough to decide that it didn't feel right. So I made a post on here and the responses verified what you just said. I couldn't have been the only one... I suggest you add something about this in the instruction manual! Save the newbies like me some heart ache :)


Our boats require that the dealer assemble them - if they sell the boat in the bubble wrap and ship them, that isn't our intention - and if so the dealer is supposed to explain in detail the systems and rigging of each model.

Our Instructions are very clear - but don't include stuff that the dealer does pre-delivery.

We are addressing the mainsheet knot issue of the TI and AI - we will come up with a much simpler solution so that if a customer receives a boat without proper dealer support, it will still be intuitive as to how the boat rigs. (i.e. no needing to untie a shipping knot to go sailing)


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2012 7:51 am 
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I went to Virgina Beach with a friend and we loaded the kayaks on the top of her CRV what a pain. It would have been easier to put them on some sort of flatbed trailer to haul them from KY to there.


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