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 Post subject: Splicing line on a Hobie
PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 8:04 am 
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Location: Indianapolis, IN
I've gotten bit by the splicing bug. I'm not too concerned about staying 100% class legal at this point and have a couple of ideas to improve my boat. I saw some of the cool stuff Ringo (used to sail a Hobie 16 spin, now sails an F16) has on his boat and I realized that there are so many things that you can do to customize a cat.

-I'm in the process of rigging up some synthetic trap lines. Advantages are that the line is very cheap ($.26/foot), easy to DIY, adjustable length, and cool factor. Disadvantages are that the line can chafe and will degrade over time with UV.
-Soft shackles. Advantages: super cheap compared to hard shackles, easily adjustable, cool factor. Disadvantages: don't know of any yet.

Anyone else have any other cool places for splices? I'm wary of all synthetic standing rigging but it is a possibility.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 1:41 pm 
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Put a bit of cover over where your trap lines get shackled, I wouldn't even bother with a thimble. I've had the same set of Dyneema Trap lines on I think four different boats in the past three years, not even close to needing to replace them.

On a H16 you could re-do the jib halyard, I'd put some cover on there too where ever it gets cleated, either a horn or a cam cleat. Dyneema is slippery, and doesn't hold in a cam cleat very well unless its got a cover, or if its been cored.

Anywhere you are tying a permanent knot, you can pretty much replace that with a splice.

A tapered mainsheet would be pretty pointless on a H16, there just isn't much running through the blocks at full sheet you are block to block.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:56 pm 
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PurdueZach wrote:
Anyone else have any other cool places for splices? I'm wary of all synthetic standing rigging but it is a possibility.


Hey M8

I learned to splice in Outward Bound School in Canada back when Kennedy was Pres in the US. It's a great skill to learn even today. However, if you are splicing running rigging it could cause a jam up when you least need it (very heavy weather). If you are using 3 strand poly, it's a ton of fun but if you need to core splice material it's not worth your time as replacement line is cheaper and far more dependable. As for standing rigging? Sorry that's nutz unless you are a rigging expert used to dealing with using an X-ray Machine to double check your work (for insurance liability)
However, a clean set of docking lines with flawless eye splices will certainly be noticed by any sailor worth their salt.

(keep in mind please that most of my splicing was done on keelboats. Your experience will differ with a Hobie...sort of)

(Hmm, was that the 3rd strand to the inside of the 2nd strand, or was that the first over the 3rd through the second?....) ;)

Best Regards
Tri

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 5:11 am 
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There is no class rule that prevents line splicing on a Hobie 16.

The prohibition is against "tapered lines". Even though the tail of an eye splice is "tapered", it's generally considered not to violate the class rule.

Splices and rope shackles, just like knots, have their appropriate / optimal uses. For example, a knot is preferable to terminate the main sheet on the lower block, since it allows closer sheeting than an eye splice. The thicker tail on a eye splice can make the line considerably stiffer and it doesn't run through blocks as well.

Knots are also appropriate on a line that needs to be removed at some point - jib sheets, traveler lines, outhaul, etc.

A splice is preferable to a knot in an Aussie jib halyard because it's stronger, has less windage and holds better in slippery Dyneema line than a knot.

I have a hard time imagining where rope shackles on a Hobie 16 could be used without fear of them shaking loose or fraying.

The problem with synthetic standing rigging is its propensity to creep under load. Synthetic trapeze lines are being used on many boats and may be safer, since they are easy to cut in an emergency.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 7:54 am 
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MBounds wrote:
The prohibition is against "tapered lines". Even though the tail of an eye splice is "tapered", it's generally considered not to violate the class rule.



A eye splice does not have to be tapered in order for it to hold well. I taper most things just because its cleaner looking and there's no obvious "bump" in the line. If its something thats running through blocks, or a thimble then you'll want to taper it because you will feel it while sheeting.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 8:19 am 
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It has been a few years since I posted in this forum (moved on to keelboats when I had my kid, really miss my Hobies). There is a relatively new dyneema variant used for standing rigging, Dynex Dux. Basically it is prestreached Dyneema that is heat treated. So far after almost 10 years in use there is no significant degrdation due to UV. The only issue I would be concerned with is the repeated shock loading from the loose riging.

I use this for lifelines on my current boat and love it. Totally a DIY project to splice your own rigging.

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'84 H16
'82 H18 Magnum
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 12:22 pm 
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Would synthetic standing rigging be better to use in cases where you leave the mast up? It doesn't sound like it would provide as much 'shock' when the wind blows the mast around.

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1979 Hobie 16 "Orange Crusher"
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2012 10:42 am 
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The Dynex Dux is pre-streached and no longer gives. It will not provide any shock absorption. It's big advantage is the lightweight. It weighs a fraction of SS. On larger boats than Hobies this is more of an advantage, but every little bit helps.

I also like it because I can make my own rigging without worrying about having to swage anything.

When I left my mast up I would remove the slack from the rigging to prevent the wind from blowing the mast around. There are several ways to do this, but just tied a rolling hitch to a shroud and connected it to the chainplate and snugged it down.

Again, I have not used this on a Hobie but I have had great results with lifelines on my keelboat.

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Nick

Current Boat
In the market
Previous boats owned
'74 Pearson 30
'84 H16
'82 H18 Magnum
St. Louis, MO


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