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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 7:12 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2011 4:27 pm
Posts: 555
Location: Central Oregon
Was out on a 16 for the 1st time yesterday. Still waiting for a few parts to show up for mine so figured I would crew on my buddys to see what I have gotten myself into! :lol:

Never had so much freakin fun on a sailboat!

Anyways we sailed up wind to the end of the lake.
Turned around and we were broad reaching back down the lake and just about pitch poled a few times. Winds were a lil gusty 20+mph.
When your getting the bow down too deep running down wind is turning the boat deeper really what you want to do? I have turn up/let out so in-grained into me that it threw me off.
Whats the proper procedure for higher wind downwind/broad reach sailing as far as traveler/main/boat angle to limit power?
Most days on our favorite local mountain lake are pretty much 20+ all afternoon...so need to get this dialed in before I go out on my new to me 16 and get worked.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 7:59 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2003 7:11 pm
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Location: Detroit, MI
hobiesrock wrote:
When your getting the bow down too deep running down wind is turning the boat deeper really what you want to do?
Yes. You want to bleed off the gust by turning down and not releasing the main if you don't have to (do blow the jib).

hobiesrock wrote:
Whats the proper procedure for higher wind downwind/broad reach sailing as far as traveler/main/boat angle to limit power?
Main traveler all the way out, main sheeted in somewhat (maybe 2' between the blocks). Steer up in the lulls, bleed off in the puffs. Use the mainsheet (ease) to absorb the shock of large puffs, but get it back in as soon as you can. Blow the jib in the puffs - let it flog if you have to. Keep your weight on the rear corner casting and the crew should almost be in your lap. Keep a foot under the hiking strap to keep from getting thrown forward if you put the bow under.

If you don't pitchpole every now and then, you're not driving it hard enough. :twisted:


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 8:54 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 7:13 am
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Location: Bend, OR
You weren't at Cultus with Scott today, were you?


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 9:07 pm 
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Location: Central Oregon
MBounds,
Thanks for the tips!!! Dumping the jib I think would of helped out a couple times for sure!

Skicrave, Nope we were up there yesterday. Ya get your boat out yet? Mine should be ready to go any day now. Think my new tramp is waiting for me at the post office.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 1:38 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:32 am
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In gusty conditions, the trick is to have your boatspeed up BEFORE the gust hits. Have the crew watch for puffs, and look back over your shoulder sometimes. When you see a puff coming, head up to get your boatspeed up and the apparent wind more forward. Proper timing requires practice. Crew usually plays the traveller here. As the new pressure gets there, bear off and go with it, with your new boatspeed. It takes some practice, but the difference between that, and making an adjustment after it gets there is remarkable. The heading differences are more than you probably think is required until you get used to it.

No unecessary steering other than what's required. Any jiggling of the rudders bleeds off way too much speed. In these conditons, it's a balancing act that there is no substitute for practice.

In really stong conditions, the main is sheeted tight with the traveller all the way out. Front foot on the back corner casting and back foot back on the hull. I've seen some who had a footstrap centered over the rudder pin, mounted on the upper casting. I never thought footstraps necessary, but do have them on the backs of the wings on my 21. We only really needed them once when we were getting airborne off of waves.

You're lucky to have a place to sail that cranks frequently.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 10:24 pm 
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Location: Central Oregon
Awesome advice! Water is cold, summer is short, but the wind is usually blowing! :D

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 1:08 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 7:13 am
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Location: Bend, OR
hobiesrock wrote:
Skicrave, Nope we were up there yesterday. Ya get your boat out yet? Mine should be ready to go any day now. Think my new tramp is waiting for me at the post office.

Yep, we've been up the last couple of weekends. Each time I'm finding more things that need to be replaced/repaired, but that's part of the fun I guess.

Let me know when you're going up, we're busy the next couple of weekends with weddings and other summer events, but I may be able to sneak out for a few hours.


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