Hobie Cat Forums

It is currently Mon Oct 20, 2014 8:47 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 69 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2012 5:51 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:02 am
Posts: 325
Location: Cape Coral, FL
I had this issue with my original sheet. I started with 2:1 and switched to 3:1 after three months of use. I replaced the sheet at four months with 6mm Marlow xls racing line.
The marlow line has not frayed anywhere over eight months of hard sailing. In fact, it still looks brand new.
In my opinion, nothing is wrong with the boat, it's just a light duty sheet for light duty sailing. If you want to sail the slop, then you need to start replacing the weak links.

Cheers,

J

_________________
2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2012 7:57 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:53 am
Posts: 299
Location: Palm City, Florida
I just now read this entire post for the first time.

Although a lot of attention seemed to be looking for a physical cause, there was not much mentioned at the time that "fraying of the main sheet" was more likely related to how we trim our sails. The general conclusion was that fraying:

Seemed to located in the same area about, 4'-6' around the Harken Cam Cleat.
Was not the angle of how the line went through the cleat and would not be helped by installing a fairlead.
Was not caused by the screws on the chafe plate or anything related to the stern cheek block.
Was unaffected by the 3:1 or 2:1 ratio.
Might have something to do with "stress or load" on the line.
:idea:.... Hummmm

Fast forward:
Interesting that this topic has renewed activity. However, other than replacement and or upgrading ones lines, not much seems to have been uncovered as to the route cause of the problem or how to reduce it from happening.

Here's what I think is going on:
A while ago I had a friends TI in my shop for some upgrades. We happen to notice that his main sheet was badly frayed (like the ones pictured in this post) and looked much worse than mine.... But I sailed more than he did. Same boat, same set up etc. So that made me curious...

Turns out my friend was in the habit of trimming his sail with the main sheet running directly through and in the Harken Cams while there was a load on the line.

I generally lift or "pop" the line out of the cams, and then trim my sail. Although this is not always possible to do, (especially when there's a heavy strain on the line), my main sheet was not as frayed as his.

It seems to me that by comparison, our different ways of trimming our sails had a direct effect on how much fraying our main sheets had.

_________________
Sun E Sailor
Ezra Appel
Palm City, Florida
2014 Tandem Island


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2012 10:04 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 1523
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
I think you might be onto something there. I had a nine hour sail yesterday, and while my sheet is not showing any signs of fraying, I was paying attention because of this thread, and yes, it is easy to find yourself pulling in the sheet through the teeth while under load, rather than lifting it out of the teeth and dropping in down when trimming is complete.

_________________
Tony Stott
2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM"
www.scenefromabove.com.au


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 1:56 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:53 am
Posts: 299
Location: Palm City, Florida
tonystott wrote:
...... it is easy to find yourself pulling in the sheet through the teeth while under load, rather than lifting it out of the teeth and dropping in down when trimming is complete.

"Teeth" Yes that's the word exactly! I was trying to think of something better than the "cams", to describe what I think is causing the fraying. But your right, the cams do have little teeth on them - Thanks :wink:.

_________________
Sun E Sailor
Ezra Appel
Palm City, Florida
2014 Tandem Island


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 11:30 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:20 pm
Posts: 273
Location: London UK
kayakman7 wrote:
I had this issue with my original sheet. I started with 2:1 and switched to 3:1 after three months of use. I replaced the sheet at four months with 6mm Marlow xls racing line.
The marlow line has not frayed anywhere over eight months of hard sailing. In fact, it still looks brand new.
In my opinion, nothing is wrong with the boat, it's just a light duty sheet for light duty sailing. If you want to sail the slop, then you need to start replacing the weak links.

Cheers,

J

Kayakman

do you remember how long your 3:1 sheet line was / is?

cc

_________________
May the odds be ever in your favor..
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 4:52 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
Posts: 9125
Location: Oceanside, California
We refer to them as cam cleat "Jaws" Of course... the jaws have teeth!

_________________
Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Hobie Cat USA


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 7:30 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:02 am
Posts: 325
Location: Cape Coral, FL
Chopcat wrote:
kayakman7 wrote:
I had this issue with my original sheet. I started with 2:1 and switched to 3:1 after three months of use. I replaced the sheet at four months with 6mm Marlow xls racing line.
The marlow line has not frayed anywhere over eight months of hard sailing. In fact, it still looks brand new.
In my opinion, nothing is wrong with the boat, it's just a light duty sheet for light duty sailing. If you want to sail the slop, then you need to start replacing the weak links.

Cheers,

J

Kayakman

do you remember how long your 3:1 sheet line was / is?

cc


Cc
i used the same length as the original sheet plus a couple of feet. Still its possible to figure how long a sheet you will need for the new 3:1 setup. Using the normal 2:1 setup, run the sheet to the bitter end at each cam, measure the distance between the two pulleys ( double and single ), double this, and add it to the length of the original sheet.

Cheers,
j

_________________
2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2013 11:46 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:20 pm
Posts: 273
Location: London UK
Thanks for that.

I was trying to be too clever and get the rope with the boat 100 miles away. I shall have to wait to go and measure it up.

Cc

_________________
May the odds be ever in your favor..
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2013 1:55 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 2:31 pm
Posts: 2738
Location: Kailua 96734
The Hobie mainsheet is spun dacron.

1/4"x 55' for the TI.

1/4"x 32' for the AI

Reefing lines are both 12'


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 69 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group