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 Post subject: Hello from Central Iowa
PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2012 5:20 am 
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Hello,

I am a hardcore short board sailor from way back. I had not sailed anything for the last twenty years but last week the wife and I rented a wave and now I want my own.

The rental boat did not have the back rests and was fine with me. I like being able to move around easy, but, is the back rest really in the way that much in higher winds? I can also see the rest being nice in low wind cruising. I hope to do some of both.

Is there an active group of sailors in the des Moines area or central Iowa?

Hope to see you on the water soon!

Jim


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2012 11:45 am 
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Hi Jim,

I live in Cedar Rapids and have been sailing a Hobie 16s for many years. I don't know of any Hobie clubs in the CR area but I'm pretty sure there's one in Clear Lake, they have a regata every Saturday morning through the summer. Jim's Sailing Center is the local Hobie dealer in Des Moines, he's a very good source of information.

I've never sailed a Wave but have seen the rentals at Gray's Lake, they also rent them at Big Creek by Saylorville Lake. Big Creek also has a Getaway for rent. Big Creek has a dry dock that can be rented for the summer, I leave a 16 there.

Craig's List currently has a Wave listed, it says it's located at Big Creek. Here's the link.
http://desmoines.craigslist.org/boa/3112641486.html

Good Luck,
Eric


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2012 7:36 pm 
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Eric,

Thanks for the info. I bought the wave you linked to! The wife and the two dogs just got back from our first outing!

The back rests are very pleasant, the wind was light, probably peak near ten and steady five or so, but it was fun!

Jim


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2012 8:12 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 7:58 pm
Posts: 433
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Hello Jim and welcome to the world of Waves!

I've never sailed a Wave with the back rests, so I don't know how the benefits compare to the restrictions on hiking out. I know the seat back rails can be installed with quick-pins for easy removal.

My wife really wanted back support for ours, and I spotted a type of stadium seat called a "My-Pod" on sale cheap in a drug store. It's oval and folds on a ratchet hinge into a shape which keeps it from tipping backwards, and it fits well on the seat pads of the Wave. The shape also means no corners to damage the trampoline, so it can be moved from side to side or she can sit in the middle, with plenty of back support.

Either way, you'll love your Wave!

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2006 Hobie Wave 7358
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 7:45 am 
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I LOVE IT!

I have sailed the wave about six times now! First few times at Big Creek, then stepped the mast and went to Cherry Glen on Salyorville lake.

One question for you wave sailors, as a reference, what holes are you using on the side and forward adjusters? I know it will vary from boat to boat and conditions. Once I got to cherry glen, there are more power boats, chop and in light wind I was getting too much slop in the rigging. I would sheet in hard to help tighten up but I will try and get to three on the fron and fou r on the sides and see how that looks.

My boat was sitting on the trailer with the mast up using the third hole on each. When I took it down to move to Cherry Glen, I had trouble getting back to the third hole on t he front. I think i can move one or both sides to the first hole, then get the third hole up front, raise the sail and outhaul and then get back to three on the sides.

Even at three all around I think it is a bit loose. I have not tried yet but I th ink I can get three at the front and four on th e sides, once I rig and outhaul.

Thanks,

Jim


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 8:29 am 
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One more question.

Where can I find some medium density foam to make a mast cradle? I thought I would carve something to fit a split mast front and rear crossbar, like the expensive plastic one.

Open to other diy solutions as well. Anyone want to share a picture of how they haul the mast sections flat on the deck?

Thanks,

Jim


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 9:24 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:37 pm
Posts: 543
Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
RVJim wrote:
Hello,
The rental boat did not have the back rests and was fine with me. I like being able to move around easy, but, is the back rest really in the way that much in higher winds? I can also see the rest being nice in low wind cruising. I hope to do some of both.
Jim


Jim
I'm glad you had a very positive experience with the Wave. Alas, the backrests are simply that - backrests. Hobie highly recommends that you do NOT use these add ons for getting leverage on your boat in stronger winds. That is what your hiking straps are for. Consider if you have to stick your feet into these straps on your trampoline, the backrests would get in your way to lean out to keep your boat from flipping over.
Also keep in mind that this $800 option is better spent elsewhere to improve the performance of your possible new Wave.
Have you ever flown a Spinnaker roaring down 3 foot whitecaps?
Now you're flying, M8!
Best regards from the North Pacific :)
Trinomite

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 9:45 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:37 pm
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
RVJim wrote:
One more question.

Where can I find some medium density foam to make a mast cradle? I thought I would carve something to fit a split mast front and rear crossbar, like the expensive plastic one.

Open to other diy solutions as well. Anyone want to share a picture of how they haul the mast sections flat on the deck?

Thanks,

Jim


Go to Walmart and get some Pool Noodles. Take a box cutter and split them.
Baddabing-badda-boom
(If it doesn't work for you, the kids will have a blast with them)
Cheers
Tri

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2012 7:01 am 
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How could I have NOT thought about POOL NOODLES? DUUHhh! I sure wish they would label that sort of stuff better, " also useful in certain sailboat applications".

I must have walked past them five times the day I went.

Thanks, Jim


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:54 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 8:00 pm
Posts: 47
I tried POOL NOODLES and They Compressed To much...Mast Wore Right Through them in no time...at first they worked good though :D....Maybe you can find some big ones....I finally went with the Hobie mast cradle....I can slide the mast back, from the front of the boat and pin it, hop on the tramp and raise it and done!! Before that, I was sliding the mast on the crossbar or had to lift it and move it back, lift move back and then pin. The cradle made it faster to rig.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 4:41 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:37 pm
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
RVJim wrote:
One question for you wave sailors, as a reference, what holes are you using on the side and forward adjusters? I know it will vary from boat to boat and conditions. Once I got to cherry glen, there are more power boats, chop and in light wind I was getting too much slop in the rigging. I would sheet in hard to help tighten up but I will try and get to three on the fron and four on the sides and see how that looks.
Even at three all around I think it is a bit loose. I have not tried yet but I th ink I can get three at the front and four on th e sides, once I rig and outhaul.
Jim


Hi again Jim
As you mentioned, when you take over a used boat, the stretch on the shrouds will differ from boat to boat. However, the angle of the mast should be set to the 'usual' conditions to where you sail. If you sail in light to medium winds, you would want your mast to be almost vertical with a slight lean to the stern. If you sail in heavier winds, a more 'rearward' angle is more efficient. How far to go to the rear? If you are getting smacked in the head due to a jibe, the angle is too far to the stern. Also if your main sheet is running out of line going upwind, the mast is set too far backwards.
It's not an easy one to call as the mast also bends when going upwind. Trial and error is prolly the best method to get your own right settings for your Wave.
This method is usually only used by very high performance Cats but there is no reason why it cannot be used on a Wave: The Plumb-bob method:
1) Level your boat with a spirit level, fore to stern; port to starboard, while the boat is on land.
2) Attach a Plumb-bob to the main halyard and lower the main halyard until the Plumb-bob almost touches your tramp. Take a fine tipped Sharpie Felt Pen and mark the place where the point almost touches the Tramp. That is your benchmark whilst on land. Make note of the Pin settings of your shrouds
3) When you change the angle of the mast, repeat the procedure and note the wind speed, your performance (portable GPS) and the pin settings of the shrouds after you get back on land.
Regards
Tri

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2012 4:09 pm 
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Jim
Regarding the plumb-bob method.
This method is used to check for stretch on your shrouds and,or a possible fail on their swages.
Considering where you live, it only takes a few drops of water to freeze and expand into the fittings.
As I mentioned to you in the last post, used boats all have their own history.
It matters not if you buy a simple Cat rigged Hobie Cat or a 40 foot ocean cruiser. The standards will always be the same:
A vessel that you know you can always trust no matter what the Weatherman says will save you a ton of headaches down the line.
Best Regards
Tri

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