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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 7:45 pm 
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Hey All
After a few days of seriously strong winds here, the halyard rope to wire splice is parting ways (2 strands have pulled out). This basically shuts me down until the new replacement halyard gets delivered (possibly 2 weeks delivery +). As the summer is quite short in Canada, I'm proposing a jury rig to keep me sailing:
Remove the halyard lock on the forward tip of the mast and simply run a new longer halyard line without the wire splice. I plan on putting a mark on the new line where it should meet the cleat (based on the old halyard). Yup I'm also the guy who said not to leave holes in your mast tip...)
Does anyone have a better idea?
Come to think of it, why even bother to order a new halyard if this works out?
Fill the old holes with jackets and new rivets and I doubt that the Comp Mast tip would care. To do that, I can't install my Chute as I would have to steal the jackets from that kit
(Damn there are times when I hate living on the North End of Mars when your closest parts supplier lives on a weird distant planet called California...)

Thanks for any response
Tri

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 4:34 pm 
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That will work. Don't bother removing the hook. Remote resort guys do this a lot. The issue is getting enough halyard tension. Know how to use a truckers hitch? You need 2:1 on the halyard to hold the sail up against the downhaul load. Crank it HARD using 2:1. Then downhaul.

The wire is best as it keeps the sail head at a constant position AND holds it into the luff track. As the halyard stretches and the head moves down there is less tension holding the head in the track and it "could" peel out. Keep an eye on the hoist position and re-tension the halyard if needed.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 6:04 pm 
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Thanks for your kind reply Matt

Yah I know the trucker hitch quite well when I used to deliver boats from Calgary to within a 1000 mile destination on the weekends back in the 70`s.
Actually a truckers hitch is what is keeping my wave from sliding back into the ocean attached to my seawall.

Kevin at Hobie Cats Northwest had a spare halyard in stock and has been kind enough to Express ship it to me.

Yah I wasn`t that keen about removing the halyard lock simply to redo it a few weeks later.

Bests
Tri

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 6:49 am 
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Another short term "trick" is to just roll the boat on it's side and tie the head of the sail to the mast head sheave with stout cordage. Spectra is best but any light line with multiple loops will work. That eliminates virtually all the stretch that will occur with a hope halyard running all the way to the bottom.

We have done that at regattas in a pinch.

Of course you have to roll the boat again when you are done.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 7:09 pm 
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Thanks Jack
My first connection with a Wave was in the Mex Riviera back in 2007. The resort boat had been beaten to death but it was the only Cat there. I got a 'job' teaching the other tourists how to sail or they wouldn't let me take the boat out more than twice a day. (Mexican Blackmail)
And yah I recalled the trucker's hitch on the halyard.
However that halyard lock is like a saw that will cut the halyard simply by just being there unless the proper halyard system is used.

Jack, your idea is also very welcomed and sound.
(edited) I assumed that it was a 'roll' on the beach but you never mentioned that. I was wrong in my assumption after rereading your post.
Yup it's a great idea not only if you're racing but could be a lifesaver if the conditions are all working against the unlucky sailor who has a compromised halyard.
Having 6 to 8 feet of parachute chord, Spectra or Dyneema could certainly make a difference in a number of ways.
Great tip Jack.

Best Regards
Tri

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