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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 8:37 am 
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I am looking for comments and tips about daily long distance in a pedal kayak.
(we will probably be in the kayak around 10 hours every day)

My husband and I will be pedaling (when it is not too shallow) the length of the Mississippi River in an Oasis next summer.

To begin:
Do we need to have extra padding on the seats?
Is there friction under our bums and thighs that builds up?
Any recommendations about what to wear on our bottom halves?
Any other ideas or comments on any aspect?


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 11:09 am 
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#1-go downstream :lol: #2-air pad,foam pad for the seat. #3-sail and AMA`s #4-check out my post,(stand up and pedal) no need to stand up but the poles are big help for the legs.(knees) #5-have fun.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 1:14 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
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Location: High Point, NC
I like seeing these type trips done in Mirage Drive boats. It helps everyone see just what the long distance viability of the unit might be.

There was another couple that traveled the entire Mississippi River in Outbacks some years ago. I remember reading their story online. They arrived in New Orleans the day before Katrina hit and were thus prevented from making it all the way to the ocean. Otherwise I think I recall that their Mirage Drive units completed the trip unscathed and in perfect working order.

Good luck, sounds like a great trip.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 9:54 am 
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Thanks, Tom. I looked up the couple you referred to. I was able to get their email address and will be contacting them for more info. They look like a great source.

"oldyaker", we will try to go downstream, but I fear that is sometimes unclear in the tall weeds of the shallow, spread out first few miles. We should be able to work it out :D

Hey out there, we are still looking for tips and ideas about long distance trips and daily long hours of pedaling an Oasis...


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 10:53 am 
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Location: High Point, NC
If they'll fit the Oasis, I'd buy and pack along two of the Dodgers. In bright sun, they'd actually make you a lot cooler by putting your lower half in the shade while you pedal.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 11:52 am 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Mississippi2013 wrote:
To begin:
Do we need to have extra padding on the seats?
Is there friction under our bums and thighs that builds up?
Any recommendations about what to wear on our bottom halves?
Any other ideas or comments on any aspect?

The answers to most of the questions that you ask above are very much up to the individual user. Some people find the standard seats to be very comfortable (like myself) others prefer to use the iComfort inflatable seat.

As far as what to wear etc, obviously that depends on weather conditions, but don't forget about dressing for the sunshine. I tend to wear a lot of long sleeve UV resistant, quick drying fabrics, instead of sunscreen. The good stuff let's your skin sweat and breath, but keeps the sun off. If it gets too hot, you can dip an arm in the water to stay cool. Cotton is not the best type of clothing to wear anymore.

Also, I would hope that you have planned to, or have already tried to go several 10 hour days. If you do a 3 day trip with 30 hours of pedaling, you'll teach yourselves a lot about what you'll need.

Other than that, pack a camera!! I'm sure that I speak for many on this forum when I say that we'd love to see pictures!

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 3:19 pm 
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Location: Auckland NZ
Is there enough water for a kayak in there? :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 5:48 pm 
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Tom Kirkman wrote:
If they'll fit the Oasis, I'd buy and pack along two of the Dodgers. In bright sun, they'd actually make you a lot cooler by putting your lower half in the shade while you pedal.

The dodger is a must. I even use an umbrella too. Plus take a can of spray lube for the drive.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 7:54 am 
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=il1x4L4b ... re=related

The video has some excellent suggestions re storage for Camel Back water systems for drinking and easy/safe storage. Possibly better seats for your trip and rudder and steering changes. I prefer the foot controlled rudder on my Bassyak/Freedom Hawk Pathfinder for easier steering and allowing the use of both arms/hands for something besides trying to steer with a Hobie steering handle. Since you will be going downstream on your trip, you can take advantage of the downstream speed to rest and use the foot paddles to steer. It takes about a minute to get used to steering with your feet, and after about 30 minutes it is automatic.

We removed the straps on our Hobie Mirages thanks to a couple of Road Runner's pictures. That way you can wear boots/big crocs or whatever on your feet, and you can take your feet off the pedals to rest or strech your legs without trying to get in and out of the straps. On the longer trips, we take turns taking our feet off the pedals to strech or to let them hang over the side and dangle in the water. We will never use the straps again.

The Hobie AMA kit makes our Oasis very steady and stable.

You will need a good waterproof GPS system. Don't buy the Garmin 76CSx. Ours died this past spring. It never went into the water, and when we connect to the Garmin site with the USB cable, Garmin doesn't recognize it, inspite of being registered. We have a new computer with Windows 7 and 64 bit opsystem, and We are not able to download the Garmin updates.


Mississippi2013 wrote:
I am looking for comments and tips about daily long distance in a pedal kayak.
(we will probably be in the kayak around 10 hours every day)

My husband and I will be pedaling (when it is not too shallow) the length of the Mississippi River in an Oasis next summer.

To begin:
Do we need to have extra padding on the seats?
Is there friction under our bums and thighs that builds up?
Any recommendations about what to wear on our bottom halves?
Any other ideas or comments on any aspect?

_________________
2009 Oasis
2012 Freedom Hawk Pathfinder


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 9:01 am 
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Some Safety/rescue suggestions for your long river trip. These should be with most of us on most yak and water trips.

Uniden Atlantis 250G waterproof Marine handheld/portable radios. Get two, one for each of you. These will enable you to communicate with each other if separated, monitor weather reports/warnings, listen/communicate with other marine radio operators and ask for directions, where to eat, or help. The systems are not light but they are durable. On a recent trip to Bodega Bay, my unit enabled me to listen to and monitor weather reports, the local fishermen and some Coastie Chatter. A NOAA weather warning re higher winds than expected saved us from a bad trip and apparently notified wind surfers to come and enjoy the wind.

ACR Personal Locator Beacon with GPS. These are emergency transmitters which use the satellites to get emergency help for you if needed. I have one of these, and it goes on any long road trip or water trip.

Link to sellers and other info on ACR PLBs. http://search.comcast.net/?cat=web&con= ... &offset=10

It's always a good idea to have a visual and/or audible distress signal such as a signal mirror, whistle, or a strobe light to help catch search and rescue's attention when they get close. Many PLBs include a built-in LED signal light for this purpose.


Spot communication system. As a back up for the PLB and to communicate with those following your trip. The REI link takes you to customer review of the Spot, and many aren’t that positive due to what seem to be predator customer service instead of friendly service: http://www.rei.com/product/784892/spot- ... -messenger

We are in our 70’s and make our purchases where we save money and hassle.

I buy a lot of outdoor gear from Cabela’s. I have a Cabela’s credit card , and I’m a Cabela’s Club member. Cabela’s sales can be big money savers.

We, also, buy via the internet from Walmart. Items are shipped to our local Walmart at no cost and often at a better price if you went into the Walmart to buy the items.

We are REI members, and take advantage of their big sales like their 30% off sale on this week.

_________________
2009 Oasis
2012 Freedom Hawk Pathfinder


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2012 3:52 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2012 2:03 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Texas Gulf Coast
Aircraft file a flight plan, you should too. Let someone know your plans, and contact them regularly, for updates or change of plans. Be safe and return safely.

P.S. Lots of pics :D


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2012 6:53 am 
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I really appreciate all the feedback I have been getting. You guys are great!
Yes, lots of people will know our "flight plan". When we have been on other adventures (the Appalachian Trail 2003, across the U.S. on bicycles - Atlantic to Pacific 2010) we have had family and friends worry if I am even a day late posting updates. If I figure out how to set up a blog, maybe I will post it here, for any who are interested!

We have been meeting with our Hobie kayak dealer regularly. We are so excited about this trip - it is hard to wait!

Thank you Tom, again, for the tip about the couple who used Hobie kayaks to do the Mississippi River a few years ago. I have been able to contact them and they are a wonderful resource. They took 2 kayaks, as the Oasis at the time did not have enough storage space. The current Oasis has more than enough space for us, our things, and LOTS of good water.

Please, keep posting any time you think of any advice!


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2012 10:04 am 
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Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 10:30 am
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http://www.antimonkeybutt.com/index.php?submenu=Home&src=

For some reason they always sell this stuff near the camping/kayaking areas in our local sporting goods store.
If you are going to be sitting for 10 hrs a day, you might want to pick some up. My Hubby spends 8-10 hours in a day fishing from his Outback and this product has helped in the past.
I usually don't spend that much time in the kayak but if I am kayaking more than two days in a row I grab my anti monkey butt to keep things calm and comfortable.

Safe trip!


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 5:39 am 
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Joined: Tue May 22, 2012 3:22 pm
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Location: Sarasota FL
Regarding "what to wear" on a long trip.

Yesterday I did a 12 mile trip, and forgot my bike shorts, wearing my bathing suit instead. Needless to say, the "rug burn" is kinda prickly today.

When I first started ocean kayaking my Oasis, after an hour or two I wondered why I had a small irritated patch just above my left wrist, and realized it was where my arm was rubbing my leg -as I tended to rest it on the rudder control. Little things like that + salt water + over time = small irritants. Solution: lipbalm.

On longer-ish days in our oasis tandem, my wife used to complain about the seat buckle "leaving a dent" on her hips. She tried sticking her towel in there, but it would get wet, so she took and old sock, cut the toe off, and doubled it over to make a "buckle cover".

Now she just complains about why SHE gets all the windburn riding up front while I ride in her slipstream. I tell her it's because she's better at breaking wind than me. 8)


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 8:49 am 
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http://www.hobiecat.com/kayaks/mirage/tandem-island/

Large capacity, stability to allow one of you to stand up and strech your legs and back.

I don't know the normal prevailing wind patterns. If it is down stream, you could make some good travel time with the sail.

The one disadvantage versus the Oasis would be more of a hassle launching and landing the TI. However, the Oasis isn't that easy to launch and land.

_________________
2009 Oasis
2012 Freedom Hawk Pathfinder


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