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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 10:31 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2012 8:24 am
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Location: Kissimmee, FL
I have a stake out pole (8') but am considering a small anchor also. I have seen them as light at 1.5 pounds and generally it seem most are 3.5 pounds for kayaks.

What do you use and how well does it work?

I would love to use the 1.5 pound to have less weight in the boat but if others find it does not work then I would not get one that light.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 10:45 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
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Location: High Point, NC
1.5 pounds. Holds like a long clawed cat on carpet. Solid anchoring relies less on weight and more on the right anchor type and proper anchor line scope.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 12:08 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 7:59 pm
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Location: Toronto
Mine's 3lbs

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 2:56 pm 
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Location: North Carolina
I use the small plow type anchor. 11/2 lbs, I think. Holds well. Like others have said, use enough rode. I also added a small piece of galvanized chain right at the anchor to hold the line down.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 3:51 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 6:14 pm
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Location: Macon, GA / Panama City Beach, FL
I've got the small 1.5# folding on a 40 ft rode. I was told a 1# plow would work better in our sandy bottom. I've been able to get the folding one to hold the few times I've used it. Proper scope is everything. Maybe re-tie the anchor and add a foot or three of chain.

I need a stake out pole.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 4:22 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 6:06 am
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Location: Amelia Island, FL
The length of the rode is more critical than the weight of the anchor. Your rode length should be 4 times the length of the depth you are anchoring.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 6:21 pm 
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I have a three pound dumbell from walmart that I use as an anchor. It holds well and is cost effective.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 7:06 pm 
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My anchor is 2.2 lbs. If money is not the object, and you want it to out perform everything elso offered for a kayak, then go to the West Marine site an look up Manson Racer Aluminum fluke anchors. I have the smallest one they make and the blue triangular bag to hold the line anchor and the RAM Anchor line lock Chock with post RAP-357PU fits nicely up in the bow storage area. It's a great system and holds my Hobie Outback in all conditions mud, sand etc. I agree it's not the weight although it's nice to be light, its the scope that makes it work.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 8:38 pm 
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I have been using a 14 lb mushroom style anchor and am solid as a rock w/shortest line possible to bottom of lake. My PA 14 hasn't budged in 0 to 3' waves and up to 25' deep. 14 lb is likely overkill but it's the only anchor that holds my 12' Scadden pontoon from being dragged across the lake. As mentioned above a chain and longer line will help with a lighter weight anchor.

I tend to move around lakes a lot when fishing so it's kindof nice not having to pull up a long line of rope with a chain attached. Also, with a longer line you likely will be drifting all over the place compared to a short rope. I like to stick tight to a particular spot I'm fishing....heavy anchor works great for that!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 10:39 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 1:55 am
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Location: Boise, ID
I'm with Jims on this one. I also use a 15# Mushroom anchor. When I find a crappie hole or a school of perch I don't have time to meter out a bunch of anchor line. I like dropping straight down and holding that spot.

I have to confess though...I've been seriously considering mounting a Minn Kota w/ I-Pilot in order to take advantage of their "Spot Lock" anchor feature. My apologies in advanced to all the purist out there but heck...we're talkin FISHIN here. :D

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 6:25 am 
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Location: Macon, GA / Panama City Beach, FL
Since we're on the subject of anchoring, how much rode do you carry? I carry about 45ft.

I ask that rather than how deep would you drop your hook. Big differences in scope needed relative to calm lakes, moderate-chop bays, or hooking to a sandbar offshore.

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Panama City Kayak Fishing Assn


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 5:57 pm 
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I have been using a 2 ft. large linked piece of chain rapped with electrical tape. It weighs around six pounds. I have it tied to a 5/16 inch 75 ft. line found at Walmart. It's worked well so far.

MM


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:04 pm 
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Location: Boise, ID
Sandy Toes - I use no more than 50 ft. I live near Boise, ID and don't have the opportunity to get to the coast. Most of my fishing is in still lakes and certain parts of the Snake River where there is little to no current.

Cheers.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 4:23 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2012 8:24 am
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Location: Kissimmee, FL
Wow, I did not expect this much response to my question.

I am in Central Florida and most lakes here are very shallow so I do not need a long rode to get the job done. I would like to use the smallest anchor possible and am leaning toward the 1.5 pound anchor but would add a small piece of chain to it so I can get a good bite.

Thanks for the replies. You gave me lots to consider.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 07, 2012 5:27 am 
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It depends on the body of water, wind/wave action, fishing style and most importantly the bottom composition.

I have a few different setups:

For sandy bottoms with little to no wind or current, I have a 100' rope caddy with an 8lb. window weight tied on. For areas where there is current like an inlet or river, I prefer a drag chain approach. Basically, you need a 3-4' length of heavy chain, a bicycle inner tube, some heavy zip ties and your anchor rope. You feed the rope through the inner tube, secure it to the end link of the chain. Apply some WD40 or generic vegetable oil on the chain in case it is a little snug and pull it back through the inner tube. Once it is through, zip tie both ends. Now you have a drag chain anchor that can be used almost anywhere including open saltwater. You can even make different sizes for your different fishing styles.

For rocky bottoms like rivers or jetties with fast moving current, the last type of anchor you want is a grapnel style anchor because it can get hung up and be difficult to get unstuck placing you in a very precarious position and unsafe situation. More than a few have had to cut the rope and lose their anchor around bridge pilings around the bridge complexes here in VA.

For vertical presentations around heavy rock structure, I actually prefer a "wreck anchor" which is an anchor that has bendable tines on it that will catch on rebar, rocks, sunken boats, etc. and hold your position pretty well, but if you get in a situation where you need to pull anchor, you just pull firmly and slowly. The bendable tines will straighten out enought to break free of the structure, allowing you to save your anchor and re-bend the tines for your next spot.

A helpful rigging tip for the grapnel or claw style anchors is to use the zip tie/monofilament trick of tying your anchor line to the bottom of the anchor and securing the rope to the anchor eyelet. That way when you get stuck, you can pedal over and pull on the rope until the top part comes undone freeing the anchor rope to pull the anchor in the opposite direction and freeing it.

For ponds and shallow water, I either use a 1.5 lb anchor with 25-40' of rope or if its shallow enough, an 8lb. vinyl coated dumbbell (for my son's kayak) or a stake out pole.

The last anchor I have is a technique specific anchor for my area but the approach can be used in other situations. It is a "piling anchor". Basically, you take a lightweight wrech anchor like mentioned above and tie it to the end of your anchor line. About 8 feet above the anchor, you install a couple styrofoam floats simply for visibility of your anchor line and then the remainder of your line (about 25' in total length is all that is needed). The conept is to use the moving water as your anchor. You pedal up just ahead of an obstruction where current is flowing around it aka a bridge piling or dock. You toss the anchor perpendicular to you and allow the current to sweep the anchor behind you but on the other side of the piling. When the line starts to catch on the piling, you loosen your grip on the anchor line and slowly drift back with the current. If executed properly, you will have your anchor on one side of the piling with the floats visible, and the tension created by the current against the piling will actually hold the anchor line in place and allow you to tie it off on your anchor cleat. If you hook into a fish, drop the anchor line, fight fish, then pedal back up to your position and re-cleat your line.

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