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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 7:50 am 
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I am in a Maine harbor for the winter. A drysuit is out of my price range (anyone giving one away?) :lol: and I would appreciate feedback for wetsuit use. The peddling aspect and seated position are obviously different than other sports..... What works well? 2 piece with farmer jane and jacket? Front zip? I don't plan on going in the water, yet --- who does? Thanks for info and anything that's for sale fitting a small female.... Went out yesterday and it was lovely!!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 9:20 am 
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Location: Central New York
I use breathable chest waders, with breathable wicking layers underneath. I start with a polypropylene sock or similar moisture wicking sock followed by a pair or wool socks, when it's really cold I use wool wader socks that go above the knee. Then it's thermal underpants followed by fleece wader pants. On top thermal crew top followed by a fleece sweatshirt and weather dictates what goes on next. Usually it's another fleece jacket followed by a windbreaker or raincoat. I like fleece gloves and usually bring three or four pairs in case I get them wet. On my head I usually wear a thin polypropylene/nylon balaclava that covers my head and neck followed by a fleece knit hat on top. Of course my pfd is always on. The key is layers and nothing is tight, air insulates and when clothing is too tight they are not as effective at keeping you warm. I have a very low risk of falling over since I am in a Pro Angler but should I fall in I can still get to safety, although I will get wet. If your risk is higher, than you might want to at least opt for a dry top.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 9:44 am 
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Thank you, Mr. Green! The fear that reverberates throughout is --- What if you go IN? "Prepare for the worst", and all that.... I, too, feel I have a low risk of it in my revo. Quite stable. I like your logic of layers. Thanks, again


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 3:45 pm 
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Location: High Point, NC
I second the idea of lightweight, breathable, chest or waist high waders (no they do not "drag" you down if you go over - water is the same both inside and outside of the waders). A pair of fleece pants under these should be sufficient.

Then a good warm hydrophobic top in fleece or similar, and in as many layers as you need. A dry top over that should be all you need.

The beauty of fleece is that even when wet it continues to insulate.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 5:09 pm 
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Location: Amelia Island, FL
If you wear waders, cinch a tight belt around your waist! It will keeo water from entering your waders and allow you re-enter your kayak.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2012 1:58 pm 
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Location: Portland, Oregon
Out here in the Pacific Northwest, guys who use waders put a dry or semi-dry top over the top. (Semi-dry has a neoprene neck, dry has a latex neck seal.) The top has a large neoprene waistband that seals pretty well against the waders, and is almost as good as a drysuit, provided you can reboard your yak. Most experienced yakkers out this way will take a newbie out on the salt if they have a drysuit or waders & (semi)dry top. Rain jacket or splash top on top of waders is not sufficient because they lack the waistband sealing feature. Non-cotton layers underneath keep you warm.

I actually prefer cool or cold weather since I am pretty warm blooded. Dressing for the cold water we have year around makes for warm times come summer.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2012 9:14 pm 
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Appreciate all the info.... Honestly surprised no one is mentioning wet suits, of ANY thickness..... Are the waders just better? Thanks, again


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:19 am 
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Location: Virginia - USA
I made a lone wetsuit post here:

viewtopic.php?f=71&t=45493

It essential gave my setup. Probably only good to air temp down to 50 and water temps at 50+ on flat water in great weather where small chance of a capsize - my intended use.

----

I think the wetsuit combination for extending flat water kayaking into the early winter and late spring next year on nice days (40's50's) is viable. May work for sailing in FL as well. I prefer this combo..

wetsuit

http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.asp? ... eptid=1162

top

http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.asp? ... deptid=942

shoes

http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.asp? ... eptid=1169

I may throw one other layer (warmth or wind protection) on up top if really cold... I do not plan anything epic like you guys may do sailing way off shore; I just need to have some protection if I take a unexpected dip to get back to nearby shore. May not address your specific question but wanted to throw support out there for the wetsuit route on cool days. Bob

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2013 Oasis w/ Sail
Virginia


Last edited by motobob on Mon Nov 19, 2012 7:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 4:38 pm 
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Location: Phoenix, Az
The links are not so good

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 4:59 pm 
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Thanks. Still gathering opinions based on experience .... Appreciate feedback.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 7:02 pm 
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Location: Virginia - USA
Kramster wrote:
The links are not so good


Fixed.

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2013 Oasis w/ Sail
Virginia


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 4:41 pm 
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Location: Portland, Oregon
lula -

The guys in our area who wear wetsuits almost always surfed before they got into kayaking. Wetsuits depend on a good fit, while wetsuits and wader setups can be kind of sloppy and fit any body type. I like the wader setup because it is economical and versatile. I can easily vary the amount of insulation I wear, and even go "topless" during warmer periods in waters where the risk of upset is low.

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2011 Oasis (papaya)
2012 Revo (dune)


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 8:20 pm 
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Thanks for feedback. I'm leaning towards a wetsuit since I've never seen myself as a wader gal, I guess......:) They're indeed far more reasonable and versatile, however. Been sticking to nice calm days lately and still enjoying great weather here. Thanks again.

p.s. --- Came across some great knee high neoprene yak boots by Neosport. Look pretty nice for wading in and online around $55.....


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 8:43 pm 
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Lula,
I ask the question of what value do you place on your life if you got into a bad cold water immersion situation?
My personal opinion is to error on the side of spending a bit more to be relative safe....so last year, I caught a Stohlquist b-pod kayak semi dry suit on sale at Outdoorplay.com for $500.
This seemed to be a good deal as my Simms Guide waders was a $430 investment 6 years ago....they are still in great condition.....but, IMO, not a good solution for me in my Outback if I ended up in the water......still, there are several kayker's who like this option.
In life you take your chances and make choices based on your comfort level of risk factors. :wink:

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Hood River, OR


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 3:48 am 
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Don't play with cold water.



Cold water shock causes the victim to
involuntarily inhale water and drown.
It may also cause a sudden increase
in blood pressure and cardiac arrest
within three minutes of entering the
water.


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