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 Post subject: Things to watch for
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 2:52 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 2:45 pm
Posts: 3
newbie here. I suspect, like any other enthusiast forum, that problems are more likely to be reported here than good stuff; nobody ever posts "I had a fabulous day/year with my XXXX with no problems whatsoever that weren't my fault!" I'm not noticing any common elements in problems, but I could be wrong. Are there any particular issues that are relatively common that I should look out for when inspecting a possible purchase?

Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: Things to watch for
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:17 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2010 2:31 pm
Posts: 71
Location: Houston, Texas
Howdy and welcome,

Are you asking about the Adventure Island (AI), Tandem Island (TI), or both? I have a 2010 TI, and I've only sailed a rental AI twice.

If buying a used TI, look for cracks in the forward crossbar where the mast collar is, as some of these have been shearing off lately. Fortunately, Hobie is very good at replacing them under warranty. This problem isn't a deal breaker, it's just something to be mindful of before hitting the water. If I was in the market for a used TI, I wouldn't hesitate to buy one with a cracked or even sheared mast collar... I'd just replace it and set sail.

Also, make sure any AI/TI you purchase has the upgraded "shark fin" rudder. Once again, it's not a deal breaker, as this too is easily remedied but these boats don't sail well with the old Twist-n-Stow rudder.

You should be fully aware that these boats are a WET RIDE. Embrace the water and the spray. Dress for getting VERY wet in a windy, often sunny environment. A wetsuit is cumbersome in Summer and useless in Winter because you're in the wind. I've had GREAT success with the following: In Summer I wear 100% synthetics that are very thin and quick drying. I like the LONG SLEEVE HydroSilk top and PANTS. Essentially, I'm completely covered from the sun in a form-fitting two-piece bodysuit base layer designed for the water in warm weather. I also keep a waterproof/windproof jacket handy in case it gets chilly. In Winter, I top this base layer off with a layer of insulating fleece and a dry suit. Speaking for myself, I've never been cold in my TI, and I sail it year-round.

Since these boats are a wet ride, do not expect the inside of your main hull or amas to stay dry. I consider water incursion here to be 100% natural for this type of vessel, so once again, I've embraced it by adding positive bouyancy devices (kayak flotation bags or foam pool noodles are great here). And get yourself a good supply of drybags in different sizes.

As with any boat, keep some spare parts on hand... rudder pins, aka brace shear bolts, and a couple drain plugs for starters. There have been posts on this forum about trips that have been ruined for want of a drain plug on a 4-day weekend in which the local hardware store was closed.

Maintenance is key. Like any boat, expect to give it a lot of care and upkeep. Otherwise, it'll age faster that you imagined possible. I've laid in a complete set of tools, various lubes (silicone and petroleum based), cleaners, and UV protectant (very important), and I'm disciplined at keeping my vessel SHIP SHAPE.

One last tip... get a trailer for your boat. I car-topped a rental AI and my TI (on seperate occasions). THe AI wasn't bad, but the TI was a little more crazy! I bought a trailer two years ago, and I'll never go back. Although I have the Trailex SUT-200 for my TI, I strongly reccommend the Trailex SUT-350-AIT if you're going to get a TI.

I hope that covers at least some of what you were asking about.

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RC
Houston, TX.
2010 Golden Papaya TI, "Trifurcatus"
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 Post subject: Re: Things to watch for
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:39 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:29 pm
Posts: 2094
Location: High Point, NC
Only one thing I can think of off the top of my head and that regards the rudder grudgeon on the TI. The stern of the AI and TI aren't the same. The AI is flat and the TI is rounded. The grudgeon on both, however is flat. So the grudgeon on the AI sits flush against the stern, while the grudgeon on the TI isn't flush.

I don't know that this would ever cause a problem, but it might be conducive to the grudgeon bolts failing at some point. With the forces from the rudder being placed solely upon the bolts instead of two flush mounting surfaces, the rate of fatigue on the bolts will surely be increased.

It's an easy fix, if you want to bother. Pull the rudder pin and remove the bolts holding the grudgeon to the hull. Now find a large round surfacce - very large diameter PVC or pipe, etc. Wrap some 80 grit sandpaper around the curved surface and and slide the grudgeon back and forth until you have created a concave surface that closely mimics the shape of the TI's stern. Go slow and check for fit often. Once the proper relationship between grudgeon and hull have been established, smooth the prepared surface with some 150 grit paper (just trying to be neat) and reinstall the pieces.

If you do this, be advised that it's not at all hard nor very time consuming, but you will want to be very careful as you go so that the grudgeon will mate nicely with the hull. I ended up taping a piece of sandpaper to a large diameter cardboard cement footing tube. This thing is about 18 inches in diameter if that gives you any idea of the radius you're looking to create for a good match to the hull.

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Okay, one more minor thing - My rudder was often hard to turn to one side. It deployed and retracted just fine, but sometimes I really had to fight it to maintain steering control. One day I shot a photo inside the stern of the hull and noticed that two of the lines were crossed in such a way that they were creating some tension against one another. While I wasn't sure that this was the problem, I took a couple minutes to reroute them so that while still crossed, they no longer exerted pressure against each other. Now the rudder is very easy to turn.

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Lest you think these boats are trouble prone - I don't think so. Sometimes with anything of this nature you have to trim and tweak a few items to get things dialed in to your liking. I've certainly enjoyed my TI and would be sailing it almost every day if the weather permitted.


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 Post subject: Re: Things to watch for
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:15 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2010 2:31 pm
Posts: 71
Location: Houston, Texas
Tom Kirkman wrote:
Lest you think these boats are trouble prone - I don't think so. Sometimes with anything of this nature you have to trim and tweak a few items to get things dialed in to your liking.


Good point, Tom. I agree completely. These are good boats. They are NOT problematic, but they are well suited for those who like turning wrenches, experimenting with new toys, and getting up close & personal with their operating enviroment.

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RC
Houston, TX.
2010 Golden Papaya TI, "Trifurcatus"
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 Post subject: Re: Things to watch for
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 2:42 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 1566
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
Interestingly, the 2013 TI apparently has three bolts holding the fitting to the hull rather than two as per the 2012 model. Sounds like Hobie were on the case already.

_________________
Tony Stott
2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM"
www.scenefromabove.com.au


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 Post subject: Re: Things to watch for
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 3:47 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 2:31 pm
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Location: Kailua 96734
Exactly what was needed.


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 Post subject: Re: Things to watch for
PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:47 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 2:45 pm
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That's helpful. I guess cracks in the plastic in general are bad, but repairable (I see that Hobie sells a plastic welding kit). I'm looking in a general sort of way for a TI.

Are there any fatal flaws in older ones?

Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: Things to watch for
PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2013 6:59 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2010 2:31 pm
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Location: Houston, Texas
Everything I wrote about above is for my TI which is a 2010. That was the first production year for the TI.

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RC
Houston, TX.
2010 Golden Papaya TI, "Trifurcatus"
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