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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 3:11 pm 
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Posts: 1194
Location: sarasota,fl
Here is a better picture of Jim's spinnaker

http://www.flickr.com/photos/28715664@N08/8538416512/in/set-72157632892143523

If I had to guess it's looks like about 60-70 sqft G1 type assymmetric spinnaker.

It looks like his rear stay is also his halyard.

Probably works nicely on an AI but might be smallish on a TI, (TI would need to be bigger).

I wonder if Hobie will ever offer something like this as an option kit.
Commercial version would need better bow re-enforcement(or possible a bow sprit like mine). A nice furlable mast topper design like CaptnChaos's.
I hope Hobie is thinking about this kind of stuff.
Bob


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 3:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:02 am
Posts: 322
Location: Cape Coral, FL
Kayakman7 aka Jesse in
Sacha; a Polynesian sailing canoe with mirage drive
90sq ft main, 100sq ft and 250sq spinnakers

My Story,

Day One

After a very brief night of sleep, Cassie and I arrived on the beach at about 5:45 am, a little later than I expected. Most everything had been packed, just the electronics, food, and mirage drives were in the truck. Met my parents and recruited them into carrying gear. Put on my Gore-tex drysuit while attending the captains meeting. Afterwards, finished packing, unfurled the mainsail, and set up my large spinnaker. I was a little late learning it was time to launch and not quite ready, but figured that the rest could be done as I sailed.

When I initially pulled on the bow of Sacha, she didn’t even budge and I had a moment of chilling horror. Image Switching to the forward aka produced better results and after a few tugs port and starboard, I had Sacha down the first slope and then the second little slope. Once in the water, I stopped for hugs, kisses, and well wishes from Cassie and the rest of my family. My emotions were going crazy, from a combination of adrenalin, excitement, and a little fear. Once back at the boat I calmed down but it was an interesting glimpse into the state of my subconscious. I didn’t feel the underlying stress but it was clearly there.

I ran the boat out past the first sandbar and started pedaling for Passage Key Inlet, I found the second sandbar with the mirage drive, but started to get some wind. It wasn’t the Northerly wind I had expected or was forecast, but was almost an Easterly wind. I was a little greedy and tried several times to fly spinnaker in conjunction with the main and only gave up after losing a pair of eyeglasses to an errant backstay.

By now, I was quite a bit off course, having had to sail west to fill the spinnaker. I was also way behind the leaders, it was kind of concerning for a newbie challenger. There was a rain squall building to the west that looked bad but turned out to be a non-event. I motor sailed to the pass, following a kayaker and a dune AI through the pass. I followed the kayaker through the breakers on the south edge of the pass.

The long haul begins.

Still on a broad reach, I set course for Stump Pass with the wind slowly dying. Sometime later, off Longboat Pass, a dune Hobie AI sailed past me inshore, screaming a welcome. The dune Hobie AI that I followed out the pass finally caught me, passed close by, and we had a quick conversation. Sacha is clearly slower than the AIs in light winds, at least when fully loaded. As the wind continued to drop, I flew the small spinnaker which added about a knot to my speed and I was again gaining on the AIs.

The wind now backed and blew strongly from the north. Conditions rapidly improved for me, as wind grew, I knew I was likely to move ahead in the pack. I soon passed both AIs and the wind and seas continued to build. I was gaining on someone who was hull down ahead of me. I hove to and dropped the chute, seas having built to the point where surfing was a regular experience. I caught a glimpse of some kayakers who turned out to be the Juice and IronBob. The seas were large enough that they were frequently hidden by waves. I closed in on what turned out to be Teak and Kokopedal flying a heavily reefed main. They were very surprised when I hailed them, but conditions were tough and we had only a few moments within speaking distance.

I was now closing on Venice and it was time to decide where I would enter the ICW. I have been through Venice once and only heard details on Stump. With the heavy sea state and prior experience, I opted for the safer choice. I reefed for the first time about four miles out and inserted the mirage drive a mile later. The pass was very much a non-event, I just sailed in and started pedaling. I stopped for a relief break on the little island just inside and was promptly passed by Teak.

I pushed off and began a long chase. After entering the slot and flying the chute, I was about to pass Teak when I had second thoughts about the clearance of an upcoming bridge. I hove to in a panic, dropping the spinnaker and furling the main. The bridge tender came out and told me I would clear the bridge by about four feet which was now apparent to me also. This was my first big oversight. I don’t know the vertical clearance of Sacha (19 feet). Whoops!

Lots of variable winds in the slot, but once I reached Lemon Bay things really picked up. I was being overtaken by a solo sea pearl, Balogh rigged class 3, and a kayaker in a surf ski so I flew the small chute. Speed increased to 8~9mph and I pulled away. I passed a couple of kayakers and finally eased by Teak within sight of the finish. I found that the channel into Cape Haze is well marked but very shallow if you stray. By the time I made my way inside, I had been passed by several competitors.

I was pleasantly surprised to see Cassie waiting for me, we had discussed whether it was worth having her drive up and never came to a definite conclusion. After signing in, I cooked myself dinner (a can of chilimac), and rested in comfort with Cassie. After about three hours, I repacked the boat and headed south.

The wind had completely died away, leaving only the slightest breath of offshore breeze. I was ghosting along at a knot or so and starting falling asleep. Chief sailed by and asked if I was okay. I was but knew that I should stop and sleep while waiting for wind. About a mile down the course, the channel opened up a bit, and I anchored on a shoal next to ShowMe. It started raining as I moved the hakas into sleep configuration. It was hard to keep everything dry while setting up the sleep system and I opted to skip changing into sleep clothes, just taking off the drysuit. I made couple of calls and discussed plans for the next day. I set my alarm for five a.m. and was gone.

to be continued...

j

_________________
2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


Last edited by kayakman7 on Thu Mar 14, 2013 7:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 3:51 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:02 am
Posts: 322
Location: Cape Coral, FL
Pictures the boats on the beach at EC2013

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wmakbw9ifrzf ... 9vj/ec2013

_________________
2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 5:42 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 2:31 pm
Posts: 2653
Location: Kailua 96734
Jesse, great photos and story! :mrgreen:

Is that a spare mast/boom you're carrying?


Last edited by NOHUHU on Wed Mar 13, 2013 6:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 5:57 pm 
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Location: Kailua 96734
Thanks Bob! Here's the hirez version.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/28715664@N ... 892143523/

The sheets tie into the rear Akas. Tricky looking setup if he douses by hand.

Can't really tell, but if there is a block or shackle for the tack line it would transfer much of the stress from the bow padeye to the crosstubes. Then all you'd need to worry about is the halyard ripping loose from the plastic mast plug! Or an Aka related capsized. :shock: Or the spin fouling the mainsail, or pitchpoles, or,..

Sue am glad someone else is pioneering this one.


Last edited by NOHUHU on Wed Mar 13, 2013 6:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 6:01 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 18, 2005 7:43 am
Posts: 110
Location: Lakeland and Anna Maria Island, FL
I really appreciate all of the photos, tracking the race, and the stories from the participants themselves. Keep it up. This arm chair adventurer loves it and is hoping to get out there with Keith on his camping trip to Pavilion - my first AI trip.

Kayakman7 - I saw your boat on the beach at Fort D so you were one of the racers I was tracking.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 8:14 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:43 am
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Location: Long Island NY
Awesome first chapter ... I'll pop some corn and get ready for chapter 2

One question for the entrants - I know its a race and all, but why so many solo adventures ? where's the pack mentality ?

there's strength (and comfort) in numbers .. you can duke it out on the last leg

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Alan W.
'07 Hobie Adventure Island #1
'07 Hobie Adventure Island #2 Golden Papaya AI LadyJane
'06? Hobie Outback SUV


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:41 pm 
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Location: Cape Coral, FL
PassWind,

The sailboats didn't seem to travel in packs like the kayaks, and I saw very few boats after the first day. Two kayakers in the morning and one sailboat in the evening on the second day. One sailboat leaving cp2 ahead of me on day 3 and a couple of sails poked up over the horizon behind me and then disappeared. On my fourth day I saw three kayaks and one sailboat at cp3.

So to answer your question, there are far too many miles in the race and not enough boats to fill them. Everybody moves at their own pace and chooses how many hours a day to travel. You may notice that the ais and tis stayed a little closer together, perhaps because there was little performance difference between them.

Cheers,
Jesse

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2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 7:53 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 4:07 am
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Location: Punta Gorda, FL
My Speck Tater's View of the Boats on the Beach

Still to come, pics from the start and more pics of arrivals and departures that I took in the channel outside checkpoint 1.

edit: that should really come with apologies for not knowing who goes with which boat, especially the AI sailors, since I'm an AI guy. So, sorry! If anyone wants to help me connect the dots and fill in missing info, I'm all ears! :)


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 8:01 am 
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Location: Cape Coral, FL
NOHUHU wrote:
Jesse, great photos and story! :mrgreen:

Is that a spare mast/boom you're carrying?


Nohuhu,

yes and no. it was actually a spinnaker pole that doubled as a backrest. i planned on using it as a mast or boom in the event of catastrophe, i actually had three mast length spars on board.... just in case.

_________________
2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 8:54 am 
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Location: Cape Coral, FL
Day 2, 4:41 A.M.

I woke up cold, shivering cold in spite of my mummy bag and thermal clothing. It was raining again and blowing hard. The tide had come up and I was no longer sitting on the sandbar but floating over it hanging on the anchor. Did I mention I was freezing? Mistake number two was packing the bivi sack and sleeping bag in the same dry bag, guaranteeing that my sleep system will be wet for the next night. I packed everything as fast as I could, switching the hakas back to traveling positions, and skipping breakfast. I moved off in the dark, taking a circuitous route in hope of avoiding the swing bridge. I grounded somewhere that the chart called for 2 feet of water. I called Cassie, found that tide was falling. This was bad, two hours to low tide and I’m sitting in four inches of water. Only thirty yards of mud between me and deep water, time to start dragging. Once in deep water, things looked much better. I’m flying along on a close reach when I noticed that I had bent the forward mast on my mirage drive and the mast had pierced the fin. Crap. I’m carrying a complete extra drive plus an extra mast, fin, and plenty of tools but I didn’t want to ruin the second drive and this one would function if I pulled the pin out pulled the fin off and reset it with the mast inside. Did this while sailing with no tools, it wasn’t easy but not impossible. I had the drive ready when it became apparent that the bridge was too low and I need to drop the mast or head outside. Hoping for cleaner winds and waves, I headed out Gasparilla Pass.

Three to five foot waves were breaking across the entire pass with about five to ten seconds between waves, I smashed though five breaking waves of increasing size, last one pushing me back quite a bit. It was a heady experience, making my way out the pass but Sacha handled the waves with gusto.

Again I was headed south on a broad reach until I saw breakers off next pass, Boca Grande, and headed further out to avoid them. Unfortunately there were breakers as far out as I could see so I chose a spot near G”7” in deeper water and I shot the breakers. I rode a smallish wave into the channel only to find more breakers on Johnson Shoal. The GPS showed fairly deep water in spite of the breakers so I surfed several breakers and the excitement was over almost as soon as it started.

Somewhere off Sanibel Island the wind died again, so I flew the small spin as jib and picked up speed a little speed. I had course set for Cape Romano and the wind was again backing around to the north and building. As the wind built, I couldn't maintain course with spin up but it was soon blowing hard enough I didn’t need it. I was dodging rain squalls, surfing almost constantly on a broad reach. I started edging toward shore while maintaining higher speed, anything too far off a southerly course cost too much speed. It soon became clear that I couldn't make Cape Romano in daylight, so I diverted to Caxambas Pass. Conditions were too difficult to consider running the shallows off Cape Romano for my first time in the dark. Many years ago I had run Caxambas in a 52’ yacht and I had a little remaining daylight. I watched a sea pearl enter, first sail I sighted all day. Surfed in pass, it was very exciting. Sacha handled beautifully, recovering from a near broach with ease. Unfortunately, the wind was blocked by buildings and there was an outgoing tide. Immediately, after the last wave stopped pushing, the tide took over, driving me back out. I pulled mirage drive plug, inserted drive, and started pedaling. I couldn’t make headway, so I crabbed over the side of the channel hoping to catch an eddy. That worked but I had tangles as the main whipped back and forth, the sheet tangled on stern light and gopro at least three times. Some cops on shore were shouting at me, asking if I was in distress and what my destination was. I replied no and Everglades City and was told I couldn't make it. I turned on my nav lights and ignored cops since they were now too far away. Apparently, they didn’t know what kind of stuff WaterTribers are made of…


Away from the larger buildings, there was more wind, and I was sailing again. The cops must have called the Marine Patrol because they roared up, lights flashing. They did turn the lights off and stop at a fairly polite distance. No lights were shined on me and I wasn’t harassed. They did ask about my sailing experience (hundreds of hours) and if I had ever been to Marco (no), they then asked if I was heading to Everglades City (yes) and they gave me directions, in general, they were very nice guys. Perhaps there was still enough light for them to see the amount of safety and survival gear that I was wearing. I was wearing my drysuit, inflatable PFD with sailing harness, lanyard attaching me to the boat, strobe light and knife on the PFD and PLB in the pocket, and have high quality and very bright nav lights mounted on the boat. Whatever the reason, I was soon on my way to CP2.

After the course change, I checked the GPS and snaked my way out of Marco, wind howling. The wind seemed to increase but the water remained shallow for quite a while. Sacha handles slightly different at speed in minimal water, can’t really explain it but I knew that the leeboard was just skimming the bottom. I was nearing the end of my stamina and my episodes of micro-sleep were growing longer and more frequent. It didn't bother me, I had a few the first day and quite a few today, Sacha is a very pleasant sailor, needing very little rudder input to maintain course. In view of my fatigue, I decided to reef slightly and after eighteen hours of sailing maybe it was a good idea, I still don't know. I reached the entrance to Everglades City at about 10:30.

A long slog

I could see the lights on the channel markers and in an attempt to take a short cut, plowed into an island that was not there according to my GPS. Oops. After getting free, I headed up the channel motor sailing and once again reef free. I think I managed to catch the slack tide because a hour later I was definitely bucking it. About three hours later I had finished the slog but was sweaty from the workout. The sweat soon chilled and I was shivering as I reached over to Chokoloskee. I arrived at about 2:42 a.m., over twenty-two hours after I woke up.

I staggered onshore (that mud is KNEE deep, we need a pier there) and was greeted by Cassie and my mother. After cleaning off and signing in, I was TOLD that I was being kidnapped and I meekly submitted. It was great seeing them, there was no sign off the cp captain, and I didn't have the will to argue rules with them. They told me that Istarock had come in before me and he was currently recuperating in a motel room, so off I went.

The place was a dump, the heat didn't work, there was no hot water, and only one TV station playing an infomercial, but that didn't matter. Cassie curled up next to me and passed out, I wasn't far behind her.

I knew Cassie would be waiting for me in Chokoloskee which definitely affected my decision to not rest sooner but I also think it was a pretty good decision. I was in an ideal starting position the next morning, having a decent breeze and an outgoing tide. I did maintain my distance goal for the trip which was a check point a day and while I was a little late, I made it. I had crossed the half way point somewhere around Marco and I was still feeling strong. If the wind holds this challenge will be easy...

to be continued...

j

_________________
2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 9:24 am 
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Location: Long Island NY
Eating this story up faster than the Popcorn Jesse - its like we're all there with you !!

... thinking of baking some Oatmeal-Raisin cookies for chapter 3

which reminds me, did you eat on day 2 ? you said you skipped breakfast ...

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Alan W.
'07 Hobie Adventure Island #1
'07 Hobie Adventure Island #2 Golden Papaya AI LadyJane
'06? Hobie Outback SUV


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 11:56 am 
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Location: Cape Coral, FL
Day 3 the pleasure cruise

I woke at six, was told not yet, and at eight got up. It was about 8:20 by the time I was ready to move Sacha. I had marked Chokoloskee Pass in my GPS but decided to follow Iszatarock out. He went out Rabbit Key Pass, which was slightly more direct and worked just fine.

Once again I was sailing south on a broad reach with Cape Sable keyed into my GPS. The wind slowly backed around from northeast to northwest to west before completely dying off Cape Sable.

Iszatarock quickly sailed over the horizon and I ghosted along at four to five knots. I used a bungee cord on the tiller to give me some freedom to move and actually snuck in some naps. As the day progressed, I set more sail. The small spinnaker was only up for an hour or so before it was clear that the big chute was needed. I flew that till the wind was westerly and the chute would no longer fill. At one point I saw two sails behind me, hull down on the horizon but they quickly disappeared. It was a very lonely day.

It was warm and sunny though; I had my thermal gear off for the first time and dried it in the sun. I learned my lesson the night before about getting sweaty, so when the wind was dying off Cape Sable at sunset I started pedaling hard with only my wicking layers on. About fifty minutes later the sun was gone and it was getting cold fast. With thermal gear and drysuit back on, I continued pedaling slowly and headed for shore. I smelled a campfire and could see the lights of campers, so I headed that way figuring they were WaterTribers. It took forever but I reached the beach which looks nearly vertical at night. The tide was carrying me along the beach and I kept a light on looking for a good spot. I found an area with slightly less slope and fewer mangrove carcasses and pulled out for the night. It was about 10:40 p.m. and I was feeling very miserable. I had skipped dinner the night before and an Ensure drink in the morning had upset my stomach. I had eaten some banana chips and a few other things but basically I was starving.

I walked over to the neighboring camp to see who I was sharing the beach with. It was a small group of fisherman, maybe 6-8 guys and girls. We talked for ten minutes or so before I headed back to Sacha. I must have mentioned that I didn’t feel good because they visited a few minutes later, asking how I was doing. I lied. They offered food but I couldn’t accept and I didn’t want to cook in front of them so I told them I was feeling much better. Truth be told, now that I knew I would be eating in five minutes, I was much better. After scarfing down some ravioli, I put the hakas in sleep position and got out my sleep system. Which was soaked, for the life of me I still don’t know why I didn’t have these critical items out and drying in the sun earlier earlier that day. With few options, I opted to sleep in my drysuit in my wet mummy bag in my wet bivi sack on top of my wet sleeping pad. It worked, I was warm and toasty as I faded off.

I tried my cell a couple of times, out in the Gulf and then on the beach, absolutely no signal. Good thing too, if Cassie had been there with a truck and trailer, I’m confident I would have quit in a heartbeat. This was the lowest my moral sank in the entire trip, the wind totally dying really crushed my confidence, I should have been crossing Florida Bay and instead was fifteen miles short of Flamingo.

to be continued...

j

_________________
2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


Last edited by kayakman7 on Thu Mar 14, 2013 12:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 12:06 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:02 am
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Location: Cape Coral, FL
PassWind wrote:
Eating this story up faster than the Popcorn Jesse - its like we're all there with you !!

... thinking of baking some Oatmeal-Raisin cookies for chapter 3

which reminds me, did you eat on day 2 ? you said you skipped breakfast ...


while i brought breakfast food, i never had the patience to cook it, and skipped it everyday

i snacked on dried fruit and homemade granola that Cassie had made throughout days one and two. i also drank an Ensure each day and had a couple of Gatorades. i skipped dinner on day 2 which set me up for serious issues on day 3.

on day 3 my morning Ensure was on an empty stomach and almost a disaster, i felt sick most of the day. i could only eat my most bland foods. by nightfall i was running on fumes and ready to quit.

j

_________________
2011 Golden Papaya TI with a 250 square foot spinnaker!
also a more manageable 100 square foot spinny...
&
the TI3 rear ama mod


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 2:42 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:58 am
Posts: 1428
Location: Forster, NSW, Australia
I am enthralled by your tale. Epic!

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2012 Tandem Island "SIC EM"
www.scenefromabove.com.au


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