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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 5:44 pm 
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For me, the procedure works the same, on old or new hulls.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 6:50 am 
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personally, I would try the opposite - I'd try freezing the collar as best I could (bags of ice and a little water in a cooler) and then give it a good whack with the block of wood.

... you want it brittle and be able to shear the joint not make it mushy and absorb the impact.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 2:58 pm 
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Mmmm,.. dry ice?

Some of the industrial epoxy companies do advocate freezing, (for harder surfaces) but you're carbon fibers might not like that.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 3:25 pm 
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Carbon Fiber actually prefers colder to warmer temps. That's why it's so good for aerospace applications. It doesn't get brittle - not in the realm of the temps we'd be talking about.

Unfortunately, most epoxies do pretty well at cold temperatures as well. I know a few that succeeded by a process of heat followed by cold. A quick transition.

Ultimately, it might be a lot less work to just spiral cut the one you have now, pop it off, buy and install a new drum. I just don't have any idea how much they cost.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 6:31 pm 
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Good to know, if you are ever sailing the arctic.

I actually was thinking of thermal stressing, which some of the "experts" use (to avoid working with REALLY volatile chemicals).

But since satellites aren't made with the same resin as our masts, (if any at all), I still can't get comfortable with freezing one and whacking it with a 2x4.

Still, if Wanda wants to have some real fun with a vat of liquid nitrogen,.. :shock: (Isn't that why God invented Youtube?)


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 10:12 pm 
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.. thought of dry ice too but couldn't imagine how to conform it to the contact area where it is needed

Also thought of a couple of those compressed air cans :idea:

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.. and a Hobie Outback SUV


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 10:16 am 
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Quote:
Hobie never did respond with an official adjustment procedure for the V2 x-bar v-brace.


Maybe not in the thread referenced, but has been noted in the past...

There is no adjustment to the V brace that effects the mast vs bearing plate dimension as was done for the Original (fiberglass) receiver or V1 akas. The V2 mast receiver is bolted to the crossbar, so is a fixed dimension.

The V frame adjustment would only be to push / seat the V frame base down onto the stud / base of the mast receiver.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 2:27 pm 
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I believe I said the same thing a few months back and folks said I was crazy.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 5:47 pm 
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Tom, I don't think "crazy" was actually used, but without a doubt, you felt many of us were at the time. :lol:

That comes from clinging to the "logic" that there is a fixed, immobile relationship between the bottom of the mast cup (the "step plate" I believe) and the roller bearing plate. On the V1 AI boats, clearly there is not. The turnbuckles can easily be used to + or- the clearance. Center a ruler in the mast cup, adjust the V-brace and see for yourself.

Yes - on the TI's there is a "solid" connection, but it is highly offset to the mast opening (as are the turnbuckle connections inside) and most of that opening is based in plastic, so it can, and does flex. Not as much as the V1, but enough to make the often-needed adjustment to keep the furling ring from dragging on the roller bearing plate.

I've said all I can. Whatever causes this magic to occur, in the end, you only need observe it for yourself.

Sorry, Wanda if we are polluting your interesting thread.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 6:09 pm 
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Apparently mine is made differently. No matter what I do with the turnbuckles, the top plate of the mast support remains in the same place. It's fixed. All the pieces are affixed to each other. I put up an illustration of this previously.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 6:22 pm 
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Wanda:
If it were me I would get a replacement collar on order as soon as possible, I'm sure Hobie and the dealer will feel for your situation and get a new collar to you, It's just a molded part so it won't be expensive. The area of the mast you are messing around is by far the highest stress point on th carbon mast, you absolutely do not want to comprimise a thousand dollar carbon mast by heating, cooling, pounding with 2x4's etc. just move on, cut the old one off, and clean up and prepare the carbon mast for the new collar. Be very careful not to nick or scratch the mast itself in any way, as even a small horizontal scratch can concentrate stress ( a bad thing). Not being careful and meticulous at this point means the difference between an inexpensive mistake or a very costly thousand dollar repair. I know some of the guys are just trying to help, I'm just sayin cut the dang thing off (vary carefully) and move on. Hang the darn thing by your work bench as a reminder of what not to do, I know the wall around my bench is pretty crowded.
Bob


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 6:53 pm 
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If it were me unless your highly skilled with a die grinder, I would'nt go near it with any power tools, keep in mind one nick in the mast and it is scrap. I would by hand with a hack saw cut vertical cuts into the collar, around 4 or 6 cuts like your cutting a pie. Wrap tape around the mast above and below the collar so you don't scratch or damage the mast with the hack saw frame. You shouldn't have to cut completely down to the mast, a thin web will easily break when you start prying the pieces off. Just take your time.
Bob


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 10:25 am 
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WHOOW WHOOOO!!!!!! The furling drum is off!!! :P
I wasn't able to get back to the removal of the drum until yesterday. I cut two diagonal cuts with a hack saw about an inch apart and tapped a small screw driver between the drum and the mast. Then slowly lifted up on the driver. I had to do some more gentle cutting to get the strip loose. When there was enough of the loose strip, I pulled the rest of it down with a pliers. I tried then to gently pry up the rest of the drum so it would release itself from the mast, but was uncomfortable with that. So I cut two more diagonal lines an inch apart on the other side of the drum and pulled that almost all the way off with the pliers when the drum started to slide on the mast. It then just slid itself off the mast. There was a lot of epoxy left on the mast. I've been gently tapping it off with the small screw driver and hammer. I now will be sanding and then cleaning it off. (As per Tom's instruction on the web. Which I should have looked at more than once when I first started this project :oops: ) I have ordered a new furling drum, thank you for the item # Stringy.
I did take some photos when I realized I was in denial. :oops: I'll post those in the near future.
So many of you have replied with advice and encouragement. Thank you so much. I won't have to purchase a new mast! :)
:D Wanda :)

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 4:05 pm 
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Great news Wanda! 8)


OK now could we clear up this apparent discrepancy in how to adjust the V2 x-bars so that the mast clears the bearing plate.
mmiller wrote:
Quote:
Hobie never did respond with an official adjustment procedure for the V2 x-bar v-brace.


Maybe not in the thread referenced, but has been noted in the past...

There is no adjustment to the V brace that effects the mast vs bearing plate dimension as was done for the Original (fiberglass) receiver or V1 akas. The V2 mast receiver is bolted to the crossbar, so is a fixed dimension.

The V frame adjustment would only be to push / seat the V frame base down onto the stud / base of the mast receiver.


I have not been able to find Hobie's official adjustment procedure anywhere. :? It's not in the support pages as far as I can see.
So if the furling drum is rubbing on the bearing plate with a V2 aka assembly how can that be fixed?
It seems Hobie (and Tom) are saying you can't adjust it with the V-Brace, whereas Nohuhu and others are reporting you can.
So Matt how would you recommend Slaughter adjust his V2 drum clearance?


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 5:17 pm 
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Stringy I could be a bit cheeky here and suggest that Slaughter's clearance issue is self-healing once a couple of the delrin balls fall out and drop to the bottom of the cup, and the mast then sits on them, so clearance at the top is increased... :lol: :lol:

Righto, having chucked off my "facetious cap", I would like to ask Matt the corollary question.....

How do I REDUCE the clearance between the drum and the bearing plate on my 2012 TI, to prevent the furling line getting caught?

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