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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 4:43 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:25 am
Posts: 44
Location: Massachusetts and New Hampshire - Squam Lake
Today I lake sailed my brandy new 2013 getaway for the first time with my 17 year old son in some nice wind. I was surprised at how much easier the getaway was to tack than my hobie 16. We never got stuck in irons and it pointed pretty high into the wind for a plastic boat!

The problem was when I let my sunfish trained son take the helm. He did pretty well but the wind was strong and the mainsheet with traveler, combined with the PIA tiller, a bit confusing for him. Well I was sitting in front of the side stay and we buried a hull and she went over. I am not sure, but I think the weight distribution may have been a big factor?

All fine until we tried to point her up into the wind to right her. We loosened the main and jib, and the main was still catching air sailing the boat on her side at a fast clip. She also would simply not point up into the wind on her side as we tried swimming her around from the ends of the hulls.

I had read as much as I could last night on the forum regarding righting fortunately and I used some of the tips to save our butts. I am 53 and in good shape and I was surprised how tired I got after just 3 failed attempts, and getting on and off the hulls.

What did not work for me:
-Trying to turn the boat by swimming and pushing the hulls.
- standing on the bow or stern in hopes of it pivoting into the wind.
- Letting go of the boat even for a second. The boat was moving at a fast clip while on its side.
- Letting the main fill with air
- Pulling and hanging on the righting line with my arms
- going anywhere near the rudders. The pin and clip that secure the crossbar fell off, wish it was pinned.

What worked right away:
- Grabbing the main and pulling it down onto the water out of the wind
- Swimming the boat into the wind from the Bob
- Leaning back and sitting on the righting line using far less energy.

I scraped my shin I think getting back onto the boat when righted, no big deal, but I need to find a better method of getting back on board

All and all, we learned a ton, and I am actually looking forward to mastering getting this thing back up more quickly. Any tips would be appreciated. My son actually enjoyed the experience sand that is important for the future, and he gained a huge respect for the boat. She ain't no sunfish!


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 11:44 am 
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Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2013 6:51 am
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similar experience for me! i took my new getaway out in some very high winds -- we were doing great for awhile then just flipped it while turning (still not exactly sure how that happened -- I don't think it was a pitchpole). we got it righted in no time -- but it was crucial to have an extra line that i ran over the top of the hull out of the water. with myself and the other person doing the standard maneuver, i used that line to lean back for more leverage and she went right over.

as i plan on taking this out myself i am interested in checking out a righting bag -- not sure if my body (165 pounds) has enough weight to bring the boat back by myself.

good thing is that you got your cat upright again --next time should be easier. everyone flips their boat at some point...you and i just got that first one out of the way quickly!


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 3:06 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2008 7:02 pm
Posts: 127
Location: Rockford, IL
Thanks for the advice! I haven't dumped my Getaway yet, and I've been nervous about it.

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Yet another Bob!


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 9:40 am 
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Posts: 53
Never cleat the main in high wind. Adjust the main sheet block so that it won't accidentally cleat itself. I stay off the bench in high wind to keep a low angle on the main sheet as it feeds into the block. In a puff or a bow submerging situation you instinctively release the main. I can't reliably react fast enough in those situations with a cleated main sheet. Watch continually for the bow to start going under and release the main and steer up to stop it. Adjust crew and helmsmen weight to keep the bow up. On a lake you should be able to avoid or correct for a submerging hull. In open water sailing as the waves get bigger it gets harder to avoid sticking a hull into the back of a wave. Get and use a trapeze if you don't already have one. See various previous threads on the pros and cons of trapping from a bench seat. With a 150 lb crew on the trapeze I reliably stay up in 30 plus wind.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 3:27 am 
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Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:25 am
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Location: Massachusetts and New Hampshire - Squam Lake
Good points about the submerged bow. I was crewing on the front and I thought we pitch polled because I saw the lee bow go under and I fell off the front of the boat, but the boat was on its side when I emerged.

The captain was cleated and the adjustment on the main block was way off from the factory for the cleat angle which made it next to impossible to release. I have since adjusted it to release at a better angle.

I bought the getaway specifically so I don't have to trap so, I will be sticking with the seats. The boat could use some hiking straps that can be used from the wing seats and I am surprised it has none?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:20 am 
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You didn't complete the pitch pole because the forward tramp acts as an anti pitch pole devise. The Getaway starts a head stand as the lee bow submerges, then water pressure on the forward tramp stops the forward roll and the boat fall over sideways. The crew usually does get thrown free and really needs to know to hold on to the boat somehow. The Getaway on its side can sail away from you faster than you can swim with a life jacket on. The 2 tramps provide a lot of sail area and the bob defeats the effect of sail or mast drag. Another high wind anti pitch pole/capsize strategy is to add a few friends to the crew. With 4 plus on the boat with them shifted to the stern there is too much crew weight to start a pitch pole. You can drive the lee bow under and it will resurface. On older Getaways with the original ports the "ice chests" do fill up with water and you need to remember to drain them somehow. There is a fairly obvious snap technique to help clear the cleated main sheet. Thoroughly soaking the main sheet to add weight helps with the snap release. Finally consider replacing the original equipment main sheet block with a Harken. The original equipment block works fine for an experienced sailor that has the necessary automatic reflex responses. The Harken provides the new Getaway helmsman with easier and quicker click in and release. Either way replacing the main sheet often also helps response time. The main sheet flattens with use and responds slower.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 10:10 am 
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Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:25 am
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Location: Massachusetts and New Hampshire - Squam Lake
That solves the mystery for me Bob. I know I flow off the front of the boat and assumed it had to be a pitch pole, and my son has no recollection of how exactly he got in the water!

When sailing with 2 folks is it OK for the crew to sit forward of the side stay?

My boat is new so it has drains in the coolers. My smart phone stored ont he cooler took a bath because my old water proof bag leaked :o

The main sheet is not bad, but the arthritis in my fingers really acts up when I am death gripping the main sheet when pushing her to the edge. I would really like to be able to cleat most of the time and have a snappy release when I want it. Maybe I should look at upgrading it to a larger/better one, although the stock one seems pretty decent. I really don't want to invest in a harken, but maybe I have to?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 1:14 pm 
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Nothing wrong with the crew in front of the shroud as long as they can realize what is happening when the bow starts to go under and move quickly to the stern to bring the bow up. Skipper and crew to the rear and keeping the lee bow in the air will however, pretty much eliminate the bow submersion problem.

I suggest you try sailing gloves to see if you can hold on without cleating before investing in Harken blocks. Since holding on is an issue you might think about going to a six to one main sheet system. That would mean a triple top block and a new longer sheet, which should be substantially less than going all Harken.

In my opinion (IMO), it is don't cleat and stay up or cleat and go over. Neither technique or equipment will add enough response time to keep you from going over in a sudden gust or sudden hull submersion.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 2:16 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2011 4:27 pm
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Location: Central Oregon
Do the factory Getaway blocks have a ratchet setting?

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 5:19 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:25 am
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Location: Massachusetts and New Hampshire - Squam Lake
hobiesrock wrote:
Do the factory Getaway blocks have a ratchet setting?


Mine does, and we didn't discover it till our second sail! :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 9:04 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2005 6:28 am
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Location: Detroit, Michigan
Ratchet setting? I've never seen anything about that! Can you give me more info?

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 9:55 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2006 11:38 am
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Location: Chattanooga, TN
Another option in heavier winds is to hold the the main sheet cleated but put your foot on the main sheet near the cleat. To uncleet the main sheet just push down with your toes, Have used this method for years

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 6:40 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:25 am
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Location: Massachusetts and New Hampshire - Squam Lake
I am still suprized that the boat pitchpoled in such light almost nonexistent waves. I thought the Getaway was more pich-pole resistant than that with the larger volume hulls?


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 2:30 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 31, 2011 9:33 am
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It is pitch pole resistant, but not pitch pole proof as some claim. Most often when you dig the hull you just slow real fast and uncomfortably. However, with excessive speed and chop on a broad reach - for me it was 15 knots - it will pitch pole. Like a car accident. But it happened specifically because I read so many people say it wasn't possible - so I wasn't worried about avoiding it. Maybe some technical people will argue that the boat can't actually fully flip forward, but be aware - you can seriously hurt yourself by thinking it can't pitch pole. Now I have raked the mast differently and I am real careful about digging a front hull with any sort of speed on a broad reach.


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