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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 10:13 am 
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This is definitely going to be the year I buy a Hobie and while I was convinced I was going to buy an Outback, I am second guessing that and considering the Revo 11. I am buying it primarily to fish out of and while it will see time in lakes and rivers, I hope to do a lot more salt water, both bay and BTB off of Southern New Jersey. The Outback appeals to me for its storage capacity, stability and built in features like the 4 rod holders. The Revo 11 appeals to me as a lighter kayak, easier to car top (I have a high 4Runner to get it up on) by myself and easier to paddle for those times I get in really shallow areas or through the surf during surf launches. I am about 5’10” and 165 lbs, so I don’t think the Revo 11 will be too small for me.
Hopefully my demo will help sort this out, but I would love to hears some thoughts on the subject from people with actual experience.
Thanks!


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 3:47 pm 
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At 5'10" you might need to put the pedals at their max extension, but I think you'll fit the Revo11 just fine.
Compared to the Outback, its kinda tippy in the waves and surf until you get used to it. You truly must demo both to make an informed decision. If you fish inshore, standing in a revo is a no-no, whereas you might be able to pull it off in the outback.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 5:32 pm 
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Location: Charlotte Harbor, Fl
I demoed both the revo and the outback and could not stand in either. I demoed the PA 12 and loved it. I ended up getting the PA 14 though as I would rather have the extra room and not need it vs needing the room and not having it.

I have not had it on the water yet but plan to do so this weekend.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 6:41 pm 
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I used to think I wanted a PA and had the great Outback vs. PA struggle on my mind. But after really thinking about it, the PA is just too big and not right for what I want to do. So much so I am leaning towards smaller than the Outback with the Revo 11. If I could have a few kayaks, I'd definitely have a PA, but for now, I have to just pick one 8)

I currently have an old Ocean Kayak Scrambler, so I can't imagine the Revo 11 is any more tippy than that. I'll see first hand next week.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 7:44 pm 
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As long as you are just demoing, I would definitely demo the revo 13 as well. We have owned a couple of them, and my opinion is it's one of the best and fastest boats Hobie makes.
Just my 2 cents
Bob


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2013 1:49 pm 
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I'll second what Bob said. I have a Revo11 but I would easily upgrade to the Revo13.

If you have an OK Scrambler11 then the Revo11 will fit like a glove. Its also one of the lightest mirage powered kayaks.
The Revo 13 adds to that formula a bigger front hatch and more space in bow and stern. Rigging for fishing is basically the same as in the Revo11.
The Outback is slightly less agile but is popular for its 4 rod holders and wider stance which is more balance-friendly for people not used to narrower kayaks and who like to clutter up their gunnels with accessories.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 3:03 am 
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I have only just purchased a Hobie outback here in Australia. I upgraded to turbo fins and the larger rudder. This is my first kayak experience and i was very happy with the result after putting it in at Port Hacking. found the Hobie Outback to be so easy to peddle and to go at such a good pace with a small turning circle. I also found that the seating was very comfortable and the kayak felt very safe and stable with heaps of room inside. I made myself a T.loader out of an old Aldi bike rack.to load it on top of my 4 wheel drive and happily it worked ok. :D


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 5:56 pm 
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Here's my update.

My local dealer didn’t have the Hobie’s I wanted to demo in the color I wanted, but the dealer in Brigatine, NJ did, so I canceled my local demo and headed to Brigantine. I demoed the Outback, and Revo 11 & 13.

I was hoping it was going to be an easy decision after actually being in each one, but unfortunately it wasn’t.

This was my first time in any Hobie Mirage Kayak and peddling was as I had dreamed, way way better than paddling. I actually felt like I was covering some distance without a whole lot of effort!

I have spent way too much time reading opinions on the internet about these 3 kayaks. Mostly, they were as expected so I won’t recap what you’ve probably read 1,000 times about the 3. What I will share is what was different than I expected.

You must realize that for the last 15 years, all of my kayaking has been done in an old Ocean Kayak Scrambler, so I make my comparisons to that.

Both Revo’s were much more stable than I thought they would be, more stable than my Scrambler. I would be perfectly comfortable fishing in most conditions in any of them.

Standing in the Outback wasn’t as solid as I might have been lead to believe. I only did it for a couple of minutes and maybe I would get used to it, but it would be sketchy for me to think I am going to stand and fish confidently. If standing to sight fish was a priority for me I would be looking at a PA or getting some outriggers.

The Revo’s with the rudder up paddled about the same as my Scrambler. I have heard complaints about how bad they track in that configuration. I am either a master paddler (which I am not), or I have been missing a world of straight tracking kayaks, because they are the same as I have been dealing with for 15 years and that’s what I have thought was normal.

Paddling with the Outback was a bit more of a challenge. That is where you can really feel the difference in resistance between the Revo’s and the Outback, but once it was moving forward, it wasn’t as bad as I would have thought. What really made it tough was the fish finder on the demo being in the way. What that made me realize is that a bigger impediment to paddling any Hobie isn’t so much the width or shape of the hull, but all the stuff we may rig in areas that need to be clear to paddle.

Pretty much everything else was as read in countless other threads all over the internet.

Honestly, I could have gone home with any of them and have been happy. They all would seem to excel for different reasons and I could easily imagine scenarios where I would want one over the other

Third place went to the Revo 13. I loved how fast it moved with the turbo fins and cut through the water. Overall though the speed wasn’t that important to me and the larger length was a big negative for lugging it around without the advantage of side storage trays.

Second place went to the Revo 11. It seemed to cut through the water easier than the Outback and was a nice light compact kayak. It felt a lot like my Scrambler in many ways, but with the awesome Mirage drive. Being able to easily move it around and car top was a big draw, but it just seemed a bit too Spartan on the deck (i.e. no side trays) and I really wanted more room than I have in my current kayak. On the drive back to the shop I must have flipped flopped 10 times in my head.

So, in the end I went with the Outback. Why? Over the years every time I have compared models, I always end up back at the Outback. I am buying this to fish out of; 4 rod holders, side trays and larger deck area to carry fish and crabs really appealed to me. Since I plan to car top it upside down, I felt I could more easily rig this kayak and keep the deck rails flat to aid in loading. The reality is I won’t really know if this was the right choice until I live with it for a while fishing out of it and transporting. I figured if I end up realizing one of the other models would have been a better fit for me, there is probably a bigger market for a used Outback than the others.

I will make another comment here, if my intention wasn’t to fish out of the kayak, the Outback would have been my 3rd choice. The speed and the way the Revo 13 banks in high-speed turns was addictive!


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 1:41 pm 
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Atv233:
I just wanted you to try the revo 13 just in case you like it. We don't fish at all so fishing stuff doesn't interest us. We have owned a couple revo 13's now and I think it's our favorite kayak because of the speed and the banked turns (especially with turbo fins). Your logic is good and given your plan to fish from the kayak the outback is a good choice, though all 3 are very good boats.
Good luck
Bob


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 2:49 pm 
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Location: Knox County, TN
I have a PA 12, Outback, Outback Tandem, and two Revolution 13s. If I had to choose between the Outback and Revolution that I would be cartopping I would have picked the Revolution hands down. It's light, fits in cradles perfectly, and has all the space you really need.

Then again I don't bring the sink when I fish.

Let us know how you like it after about a month of lifting it onto your vehicle after a long day.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 3:24 pm 
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Location: Jaco, Costa Rica
If I was in Jersey and or colder water and fishing in shore, definitely the Outback/PA's. If I was in warmer waters year round and or fishing out front, the Adventure Island hands down. Revolution 13 for a compromise between the two.
8) Mark

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Adventure Island- 2014
Revolution 13- 2013


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2013 8:28 am 
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Location: Phoenix, Az
atv...You done good and liked your posts on your decisions....love reading this stuff

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1 Revo 11
3 Revo 13s
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2013 12:46 pm 
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C4PZL0K wrote:
I have a PA 12, Outback, Outback Tandem, and two Revolution 13s. If I had to choose between the Outback and Revolution that I would be cartopping I would have picked the Revolution hands down. It's light, fits in cradles perfectly, and has all the space you really need.

Then again I don't bring the sink when I fish.

Let us know how you like it after about a month of lifting it onto your vehicle after a long day.


So far car topping is appearing very manageable with the Outback and I have a fairly tall vehicle, 2010 Toyota 4Runner. A few things I am doing make it work.

I am car topping it upside down, flat on Thule bars, so I don't have to "wrangle" it into cradles. I also installed a cool devise, the Thule Outrigger II. Fits inside the Thule bar when not in use and quickly slide out when needed. With that devise, I just pick up the front of the Outback, set it on the outrigger, then pick up the back and slide it onto the bars. I have to work it back and forth a bit but that's pretty much it. One thing with this setup is that the deck needs to be a clear a possible. Anything sticking up can really get in the way. I even removed the rod holder covers because they and their screws were getting in the way. With the trays on the outback, I can mount things like Ram balls and GearTrac in them keeping all attachment points below the deck.

I figure worst case, I'll just buy a Hullavator, but so far this is clean, easy and simple.

I finally got the kayak out for the first time and I had my two girls (3 and 8) in the back of the Outback going for a ride! I don't think they would have fit in the Revos.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2014 11:22 am 
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atv223 wrote:
I also installed a cool devise, the Thule Outrigger II


atv - I just picked up the outback and have been looking at the outrigegr II as well. Curious how you manage not damaging the rudder with this device. Please advise your experience with the outrigger.

Great post btw, it helped with my decision as well.

- KEn


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 1:17 pm 
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The only time the rudder enters the loading process is when I lift the front of the kayak and the rudder is the pivot point on the ground. If I am over grass or soft dirt, I don't really worry about it, if on asphalt, concrete, etc. I put a mat or piece of cardboard on the ground for the rudder to pivot on.

I installed the Outrigger II on the front Thule bar. Here is my procedure:

Lay the kayak upside down on the ground next to the vehicle with the front of the kayak in the same direction as the vehicle (kayak will be loaded upside down)
Extend the Outrigger
Lift the front of the kayak up and place on the Outrigger
Pick up the back of the kayak. Once about level with the Thule bars, slid the kayak forward a bit on the Outrigger
Swing the back of the kayak over the rear Thule bar and set it there
Work the front of the kayak off of the Outrigger onto the front Thule Bar
Adjust it to your desired position.

Keep in mind there is a lot of "shimming" to get it on and in place. The more stuff you mount on the deck, the more challenging this becomes. I also found the one side handle can stick and grab with sliding it on, so you may have to unweight (lift it slightly and slide at the same time) it to get it in place.

I have had the kayak about a year now, but I abandoned the Outrigger a a few months after I got it. I didn't like not being able to mount stuff on the deck, there was the rudder grinding into the ground issue and it was only a matter of time before something slipped and the kayak whacked into my 4Runner or worse (I even got to the point of putting yoga mats on the 4Runner during loading). I ended up spending the money and just buying a Thule Hullavator. I love my Outback, but my Hullavator makes me love it a whole lot more! So much easier to load and tie down.


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