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PostPosted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 10:37 am 
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Location: London
Hi Folks,

I have been given a H16 mast which is newer than my current one.
The thing is on picking it up I felt and heard the slosh of water which appears to be trapped inside.
Tried tipping it up in the hope to drain but no joy.
So what is the best method to drain it?

Drill a small hole in one end and seal when drained?
Drill out masthead or mast base rivets remove either end, empty and re-rivet?

Any other suggestions?

Thanks
SRG

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Hobie 14 Turbo (~1979)
Hobie 16 Carumba (1983)


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 11:01 am 
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Location: Clinton, Mississippi
Remove both head and base. There should be foam plugs inside that need to be removed for draining/inspection/cleaning/resealing. Replace head and base, and seal rivets located anywhere on the mast between the two plugs.

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Jerome Vaughan
Hobie 16


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 6:11 am 
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Location: Virginia Beach VA
I had this problem with a H14 mast. Some previous owner had installed a sail feeder kit. http://www.murrays.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=50-80100501&Category_Code=C-SA&Store_Code=MS. When the mast was stored curf side up, rain water was channeled to and seeped in around the screws. I took the screws out and let the water drain away. If you don't have one of these, I like your suggestion of drilling a drain hole rather than trying to remove the mast head or base. Depending on how old the mast is and how much corrosion there is this could be a major PIA. Not sure how much foam there is in the mast but you obviously want to drill far enough up the mast from the base to miss it.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 6:44 pm 
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Since it has water in it anyway, before you fix it, have some help to carry it out in less than waist deep water, and look for bubbles coming from where it's leaking. Then drain it and fix the old leaks too.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:57 am 
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Location: Clinton, Mississippi
I was probably a little too brief in my previous reply. If there's only a small amount of water in the mast ,then draining through an existing hole is probably best. If the leak is bad, it could easily be one (or both) of the foam plugs. Not a very difficult job to remove/reseal these and bring an elevated level of confidence in an older boat. Further, I've seen masts get mud inside that couldn't be effectively removed through a small opening.

Regardless, it is important not just to drain but to find the source of the leak and fix it after draining. Also important to understand that the head and base do little to seal the mast....that's the job of the foam plugs (which can get misplaced if they are loose).

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Jerome Vaughan
Hobie 16


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 12:41 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 12:02 am
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Location: London
Thank You All for your advice. Damn, I love this forum!
I have been rather busy getting my old 84 Hobie 16 ready for our upcoming holidays.
The hulls were leaking and one pretty bad, so did a bottom job on both hulls just need to sand and paint the last one and they should be good to go.

I manged to take the mast head off, wasn't to much of a issue. But will drain and give the mast a good going over on my return.
Will be taking my original mast and the now loose spare masthead and main halyard as backup.
The masthead pulley on my original is looking rather brittle and has a few cracks around its edge.
Indeed the other week when taking down the mainsail the halyard wire line some how slipped between the masthead pulley and the masthead casting it was jammed so tight it took a heck of a job to release it, with the risk in stating the obvious it required lowing the mast. Hey Ho!

Thanks Again Folks :D

SRG

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Hobie 14 Turbo (~1979)
Hobie 16 Carumba (1983)


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 10:31 am 
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Location: Clinton, Mississippi
paragon1970 wrote:
Indeed the other week when taking down the mainsail the halyard wire line some how slipped between the masthead pulley and the masthead casting it was jammed so tight it took a heck of a job to release it, with the risk in stating the obvious it required lowing the mast.


Just so you know.....

When working up on the mast is necessary, but you are not otherwise planning to lower it, you can get to the offending item by flipping the boat over on it's side. If there's sufficient room to do so, this is usually much easier than fiddling with the mast. Just make sure the rudders, stick, boom, etc. are held up so they aren't jammed into the ground and loaded with the weight of the boat.

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Jerome Vaughan
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