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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 12:43 am 
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In that case, one more for the Misses. After your tasting, grab a jar of the winery's wine-infused "Sweetheart Jelly".

Up to 16 servings, depending on where you spread it,.. :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:37 am 
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Hi,

I kayaked in Acadia National park about twenty years ago with some guides. We kayaked out of Bar Harbor. It was amazing.

If you aren't up to speed on hypothermia, I'd read up and take it very seriously. The guides warned us over and over against tipping the kayaks. The water there is extremely cold. I live very near Lake Michigan. Lake Michigan is cold and deep, but it ain't nearly as cold or deep as Bar Harbor. This summer in Leelanau county (on Lake Michigan) there were 16 "dry drowings" and counting. A dry drowing is basically death by hypothermia. You can "drown" even while wearing a PFD.

I hate to be such a downer, but until this summer I wasn't nearly as concerned about hypothermia as I was drowning. And, I figured I wear a PFD, so I'm fine. Cold water can be really dangerous. The guides were saying (if I remember correctly) that the water temp I. July was around 53 degrees. They said you got anywhere from 12 to 20 minutes in the water.

Anybody who knows different feel free to chime in. I'd suggest a wetsuit at the very least, but probably dry suits.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 5:12 am 
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Location: Belfast, Maine
Hey Nohuhu---Too bad I missed you. This is the other side of the planet, "dontcha know" as they say in these "pats". I should check in more often. Haka is working out fine. Only made one. If I make another someday I will notch the vertical, longitudinal "rib" where it crosses the flat, middle slat for more strength, if that makes sense. That's probably what you guys did. Hope your trip was a good one.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:31 am 
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NOHUHU wrote:
In that case, one more for the Misses. After your tasting, grab a jar of the winery's wine-infused "Sweetheart Jelly".

Up to 16 servings, depending on where you spread it,.. :mrgreen:

Image


That, my good Sir, could lead to quite the sticky situation ... fortunately I have just the right music to smooth out such an occasion :idea:




Ehh - Jam, Jelly .. its all good :P

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His/Hers Papaya Hobie Adventure Island's
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 7:40 am 
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leelanauX wrote:
Hi,
I kayaked in Acadia National park about twenty years ago with some guides. We kayaked out of Bar Harbor. It was amazing.

If you aren't up to speed on hypothermia, I'd read up and take it very seriously. The guides warned us over and over against tipping the kayaks. The water there is extremely cold. I live very near Lake Michigan. Lake Michigan is cold and deep, but it ain't nearly as cold or deep as Bar Harbor. This summer in Leelanau county (on Lake Michigan) there were 16 "dry drowings" and counting. A dry drowing is basically death by hypothermia. You can "drown" even while wearing a PFD.

I hate to be such a downer, but until this summer I wasn't nearly as concerned about hypothermia as I was drowning. And, I figured I wear a PFD, so I'm fine. Cold water can be really dangerous. The guides were saying (if I remember correctly) that the water temp I. July was around 53 degrees. They said you got anywhere from 12 to 20 minutes in the water.

Anybody who knows different feel free to chime in. I'd suggest a wetsuit at the very least, but probably dry suits.

Nancy & I kayaked off Stonington, probably around 2002, to get a taste of cold water paddling--we live in FL and had never done any. The water off Stonington was about 54-55 deg. The intent was to prepare us for paddling in Alaska. Frankly, paddling out of Stonington was no prep for the water temps in Alaska, which were in the range of 37-39 deg. When you paddle in waters as cold as Alaska, the danger of hypothermia is very real, but the "involuntary gasp" when you capsize and contact such cold water causes real drowning very quickly. Of course, if you survive that first contact with water, you only have a 10-15 minutes before you are incapacitated sufficiently, so that you cannot climb back into your boat or any boat, even if it were available. You must be pulled from the water to survive. A high-quality, absolutely dry drysuit (good fitting latex gaskets) with suitable clothes underneath is the only thing that is going to keep you alive for any time in AK waters. Some kayakers in very cold water also wear rubber skull caps (like shower caps) to avoid that involuntary gasp if they capsize. In Maine coastal waters, you will have more time, the involuntary gasp may not be a problem unless you are in poor health, but the same concerns prevail.

On one of our trips into Glacier Bay NP in AK, a female Park Ranger had been out solo paddling and was capsized when a whale approached too close (or vice versa.) She survived. I don't know what she was wearing.

Of course, AI/TI sailors probably don't have to worry much about falling into cold water. Still, they must be able to keep warm to enjoy their sail. I would think a drysuit would be appropriate in Maine waters.

Keith

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I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 10:18 am 
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Brrrr!! Frankly, in Acadia, the bikes are the way to go.

The interlocking carriage trails, mountain and coastline paths offer worldclass biking trips. It's biker heaven. Top it off with a downhill run on Mt Cadillac. Plenty of thrills, scenary and wildlife to be had. No dry suit required.

Love my Hobie, but in this great park, I'd rather be pedalling something else, while keeping my trail nuts warm and dry.

And speaking of cold, camping on the parks tent platforms, along the foggy shoreline during a near frost morning was about the coldest this poor Hawaiians bones have ever been!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 11:01 am 
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Location: South Florida
NOHUHU wrote:
And speaking of cold, camping on the parks tent platforms, along the foggy shoreline during a near frost morning was about the coldest this poor Hawaiians bones have ever been!

NOHUHU, what were you doing in Maine? Were you lost? That is good advice about using bikes on Mt. Desert.

Coldest I've done is in Yellowstone National Park--about 22 deg and snow a couple years ago, but my wife and I were pretty much prepared for it. There are people who snow camp, you know, but it has never appealed to me. Actually, after I got back from that trip to Yellowstone, I bought a new sleeping bag--good to 15 deg--and took my "32 deg" bag to S FL.

We've done numerous trips to Yellowstone including a couple winter trips. We stayed in the "Snow Lodge" in Yellowstone in the winter. I can recommend Yellowstone in the winter, absolutely beautiful, and not many people around. Our 2-3 winter trips were probably about 10 yrs ago, and I was still skiing. We saw Yellowstone on cross country skis. Terrific way to do it, although you can also do snowshoes and/or snowcat rides. You have to take a snowcat into park; although, if you snow camped you could use cross country skis or snowshoes.

Keith

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I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:14 pm 
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Chekika wrote:
NOHUHU wrote:
And speaking of cold, camping on the parks tent platforms, along the foggy shoreline during a near frost morning was about the coldest this poor Hawaiians bones have ever been!
NOHUHU, what were you doing in Maine? Were you lost? That is good advice about using bikes on Mt. Desert.Keith
Leaving a trail of cash mostly. That way, I never get lost. :cry:

Guess I should warn Passwind about getting sucked into the giant shopping vortex at LL Bean. It's located "in" Freeport, ME but pretty much has its own zip code, like Disney world.

This my friends, is just the fishing section: There are dozens more...

Image

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It's mandatory - if you're driving through Maine, you gotsta pay the moose.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:57 pm 
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Location: High Point, NC
Last March, here in NC (which gets a heck of a lot colder than many realize, particularly in the western portion of the state - although this was balmy compared) I was preparing to sail my TI on a nice sunny early spring day. I had already taken the water temp - it was 48F and very windy. 15 to 20MPH. I was dressed for it. I always expect to get wet.

While talking to another sailor, a third sailor was launching a small centerboat boat. A 14 foot Hunter. Nice boat. As he stepped off the dock the boat rocked and he grabbed the mast. In an instant he capsized.

The water there at the dock was neck deep on him. He hit the bottom, stood up, and in an instant just sort of froze. We rushed over and pulled him out of the water whereupon he just sort of lay on the dock in a daze. A lady came over and put a coat over him. He was dressed in blue jeans and cotton shirt and jacket. He was in shock and could not have gotten out of the water and onto the dock by himself. He didn't even attempt walking back towards and onto the launch ramp 25 feet away. I don't think he could have.

I'm convinced that had he launched and sailed away to deeper water out of immediate reach of help, he would have capsized and died. Capsizing at the dock, oddly, saved his life. And this was only 48F water.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:55 pm 
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I know I'm hitting this point pretty hard... But I came to the realization this summer that hypothermia is more deadly than drowning risk, precisely because most people don't understand how dangerous it is. And unlike drowning, ALOT of people take almost no precautions against it. With drowning simply wear a PFD. With hypothermia, even wrapping your brain around what is necessary precautionary equipment can be difficult.

Imagine this scenario:

You go sailing in Bar Harbor, or in Pictured Rocks in Lake Superior. It's late July and while the air temperature is in the mid to high 80s, the water temp is in the 50s. Feel like wearing a dry suit? Not so much, but if you fall overboard without one you may very well be toast.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 8:16 pm 
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leelanauX, et al .. I greatly appreciate you bringing the risks of hypothermia and cold water sailing to light, for all to benefit from .. and you're right it doesn't have to be air-temperature cold as we make our own "cold" when you add wet and wind(chill).

As for sudden shock from cold water .. its all too real for me. Years ago I lifeguarded at a country club and by their indoor pool they had both a hot tub and what was called "The Arctic Blast" which was a 5' deep dunk tub chilled to 45*F (about the size of a very small hot tub). They had just installed it the previous winter ... I had to pull out 3 people withing 2 weeks after which it was closed (cpr on one .. far from a hobie supermodel)

Im crazy but not stoopid. If the risks are unmanagable then bike riding and hiking in the park it is and sailing can wait for the lakes. Likewise, The truck tent for bedding down will prolly be the call if its damp and windy and platformy .. the retractable roof and even the gate/window of the SUV can stay closed. Its a pretty nice piece of kit designed for a very oddball vehicle.

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His/Hers Papaya Hobie Adventure Island's
.. and a Hobie Outback SUV


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2013 8:02 am 
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Awe, c'mon guys. Even if you throw in a few angry sea lions, Downeast cant be much more dangerous than the average Aussie pleasure paddle, right?

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/3862914? ... d%3D368738

Still, you have to wonder why all the members of the Bar Harbor Hobie Island Sailing Club aren't weighing in with helpful advice. :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2013 10:41 am 
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Had some time this weekend to play with setting up with the trip

- set up the custom tent/camper option that was factory-made for my GMC Envoy XUV. Should work well for our 3 nites in Acadia ... even tested out the inside accomodations - just over 4' wide inside and the Missus and I were comfy side by side. She even gives it the "thumbs up". Bought the setup when I got the truck but until yesterday al its done is sit in the bag.

Image

Next on the list was figuring out how to get 2x AI's, 4x Ama's, and 2x sails UP on top. Hullivators make quick work of the AI's but I have to figure out a way to secure the Ama's for 1200+ miles. The bottom ones are just sitting on some pool noodles in the pics - SUGGESTIONS ARE WELCOMED !! Sails will just get lashed to the underside of the Hulli's close to the rack uprights - done that before and it works fine

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Of course, this whole mess needs to come off the roof to put the tent up :lol: :roll: Ohh .. and all the gear (which will be in totes) has to come out

... could always make the last minute decision to bring the trailer but I dont fancy dragging it behind us for 1200 miles plus the wife can't drive then (maybe thats a good thing ?)

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His/Hers Papaya Hobie Adventure Island's
.. and a Hobie Outback SUV


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 10:39 am 
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Passwind, you are one lucky stiff.

Acadia is now closed with fhis cursed government shutdown! :roll: (At least they can't shut down the offshore activities.)

Looks like you two got out of there JUST in time.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 8:38 pm 
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Nice job, Alan!

I have not gone into the Everglades National Park during a shutdown. I do know that the trick is to avoid trying to use any entrance gates into a national park during a shutdown. During the last shutdown, we tried to go into Bryce Canyon National Park thru the main entrance and were turned down by the Park super--he was probably the only one on the payroll. We were cross country skiing, so we simply took a route about 1/2 mi away, out of sight of the gate. On our exit, it was easier to hike along the main road on our way out. The super came by, never said a word about our transgression, and offered us a ride to the main gate. Nice guy. I see that Bryce is one of several national parks that is going to open using state funds in an agreement w/ Dept. of Interior. Bryce is another beautiful place to visit, summer or winter.

With any luck, this wasteful, unnecessary shutdown will be over shortly--days that is.

Alan, we're are all looking forward to more pictures.

Keith

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I sail: Biscayne Bay, Everglades to Cape Romano, Ft Desoto, Cedar Key

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex ... It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." A. Einstein


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