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 Post subject: Halyard "Fork" On Mast
PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 11:25 am 
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Location: Detroit, Michigan
Can someone tell me the purpose of the "Fork" at the top of the mast that captures the halyard when the sail is up? I have never seen it on any other sailboat. What would be wrong with simply hoisting the main sail and cleating it off without hooking the halyard in the fork? It sure would make lowering the sail in an emergency a lot quicker. What is its purpose and what are the risks of not using it?

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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 1:07 pm 
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The Fork captures the wire segment of the halyard to hold the sail at the fully hoisted position. It also holds the head of the sail into the luff track. Without the wire the sail can pull out of the track and the sail would slip down under downhaul and main sheet tensions. This would lower the boom.

Not using the hook = bad.

Review the rigging video for proper technique. Its not difficult to do.

H16 FAQ page: http://www.hobiecat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=12697

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PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 12:04 pm 
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Not to disagree with Mr Miller, but I was unable to use the top fork for about five years due to an incident affecting the top of the mast. I cut off the wire halyard segment and cleated it at the base of the mast with no problems, except that it sometimes would drop just a bit at the top. No question that top locking is far superior though. Holland.


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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 12:10 pm 
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Thanks for the input Holland. Being an engineer I would like to understand this situation better. I'm still not understanding what exactly is different between the Getaway and other sailboats. Does the Hobie 16, 17, 18, or Tiger use this "fork" setup?

What is different about the Getaway mast that would allow the sail to pull out of the track?

There have been several times in high winds and high waves that I needed to get the main down quickly, and the last thing I wanted to do was run out on the front tramp and try to unhook the halyard while the boat was pitching all over the place. It would sure be nice to be able to simply uncleat the halyard and drop the sail.

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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 7:53 pm 
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Looking at the parts guide, it looks like the Wave, H14, & H16 all use a fork similar to the Getaway. The H17 & H18 have a hook at the top that a metal ring attached to the head of the sail goes on. I don't see the tiger setup in the parts guide, but I assume it's similar to one of these designs.

All these designs "ground" the sail tension at the top of the mast. As you describe your setup the sail tension is carried by the halyard around the pulley at the top of the mast and back down to be "grounded" at the mast base. Grounding at the base basically sets up a 2:1 purchase, so that for the same luff tension you double the compression force in the mast. I don't know how this loading compares to the side loading from the wind or the tension in the shrouds and sheets, but it's just one more thing working to buckle / bend the mast.

Other sailboats I've seen that ground at the mast base are keelboats. These tend to have thicker masts relative to sail area and have more elaborate shroud/stay designs to help resist bending. Beach cats are meant to be simple to set up and take down for easy transportation and quick launching. I assume that grounding the tension at the top of the mast helped the designers to lighten up the mast and simplify the rigging.

Also being an engineer myself I would tend to want to use the design as intended.

-Rowdy


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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2014 9:07 am 
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14, Wave,16 and Getaway all use the fork. Other models except Sport Cruiser use a hook and ring.

The Sport Cruiser is a perfect example of why the fork or hook are best. The halyard on the Sport cruiser must me hoisted with 3:1 purchase and even with that the down haul overcomes the halyard tension... the main slips down the track causing you to lose luff tension and... the head of the sail pulls out and jams in the track if not held in the fully hoisted position.

At the Bitter End Yacht club and some other heavy user resorts... they sometimes use rope halyards. The wire part of the halyards wears and causes them to replace halyards, so they use what they can get. The sails look like poop (wrinkled) and perform poorly, but hoisting is easier for staff.

Look guys... I'm not an "engineer", but I've been sailing Hobie Cats since 1976 and know a thing or two about this issue.

Use the stock system. They are easy to use. They work.

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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2014 11:16 am 
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Use the fork!

If you just tie off the halyard, you're not going to be able to pull in the mainsheet or downhaul to flatten the mainsail, you'll just be stretching the halyard and sliding the sail down the mast.

This is probably why you feel like you need to take the sail down when it gets windy - you're getting overpowered because you can't tighten the downhaul and flatten the sail out. Instead of worrying about getting your sail down in a hurry when the wind comes up, work on tuning the rig by tightening the downhaul, tightening the mainsheet, and travelling out. But none of this will be effective unless your sail is fully hoisted and locked in at the top.

Bottom line - use the halyard the way it was designed.

sm


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PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2014 10:44 am 
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If you ask me the fork is much easier to use then the hook ring. There are folks who add zippers their main sails to create smaller heavy weather sails. I assume they don't use the fork?


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PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 6:02 pm 
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Kevin, I agree. I had a 17 with the hook and ring. What a pain!
Yes, if you have a zipper reefed sail, you just cleat the sail off, unless you make up a special halyard with 2 stops.

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