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PostPosted: Wed May 19, 2004 7:20 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2004 1:26 pm
Posts: 127
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
OK, last night, I tried the EZ Step that came with my Getaway. It was still brand new in the tube, and I had to bend one of the tangs to fit the 90 degree from forward position of the mast while it's being stepped. Basically, it does allow you to raise the mast from the trailer winch, however it doesn't control the mast as it swings through it's arc until the slack in the shrouds is taken up. Being that far off the centerline also creates other undesirable forces in the rigging, trailer strap, etc. I may rig up something to control the swing so I can do it solo, but since I'm usually with someone of the female persuasion, hopefully she can "man" the winch, and I can stabilize the mast. As of right now, it may just be easier for me to lift it manually while she's got the main halyard.

I did rig the traveler line properly last night. Thanks. I've taken inspiration from V-Ray11 and am developing a tent kit for the boomless Getaway. I will post details when they become available. I'm off to shop for a righting bucket system. I discovered a righting line tucked up inside of the hulls last night. Since I didn't successfully raise the mast solo (almost asked an attractive woman walking her dog for assistance), I didn't get a chance to practice trapping out. Maybe tonight I can get someone to go down to Texas City Dike with me. I've also joined a local list that's pretty cool.


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PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2004 9:34 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2003 7:09 am
Posts: 18
Location: Texas
CL,

You're right--trig don't lie! You do lose tiller leverage as you scoot forward, and this effect is SLIGHTLY amplified by the off-center pivots of my dual hiking sticks. You may not be able to go as far forward as you like (hiking sticks have length limits, too), but your crewman can. Hiking out also helps give you a better "angle of attack." I suppose I could grab the opposite hiking stick for a better angle, but in my case it wouldn't make a huge difference. Now if your hiking stick had a clamp to attach it to the tiller bar, you could position it wherever you like. Then for a long upwind leg you could slide it over to the leeward side of your tiller bar to tame that pesky cosine. But that's just crazy talk! (Also, your mainsheet would probably get in the way.)

Regarding mast raising, I do something similar to what you did with your Wave, using an extra block on the mast support. This, of course, is a two-human job. I still don't quite understand the problem you've had with your gin pole setup, though. My understanding of these systems is that lateral stabilizing straps--similar to shrouds--are attached to the mast to keep it from pivoting freely. By preventing movement about the yaw & roll axes, the mast is constrained to rotation only about the pitch axis, i.e. tilting forward to vertical without falling over sideways. If the gin pole is similarly constrained, seems like one person should be able to do this--isn't that the point? Am I missing something here?

I haven't had to use the halyard to install the jib snorkel. I just push it up as I zip it and it slides all the way to the top.

Glad to see you got the fairlead issue resolved. My hands are getting blisters just thinking about trying to travel up at 1:1 in a stiff breeze; 2:1 is hard enough, sometimes!

Your Jack Sparrow impression sounds like a real Kodak moment--wish I'd seen it!

Thanks for the vote of confidence in my inventiveness regarding the righting issue--but sounds like you just invented it yourself!

Not sure what the exact problem is with the furler, but here are some things that would be worth checking to make sure it's rigged right (assuming it's the same as the '03 Getaway's). First, of course, the head and tack of the jib must be tied to the forestay hardware to keep the stay from simply spinning inside the luff sleeve. The sail winds CW around the stay, which should allow you to clip to the loop, though this doesn't hold the roll very tight. When you pull on the furling line it should rotate the stay CCW to roll the sail CW. To "reset" my furler I pull the line all the way out and cleat it. Then I manually wrap the sail CW and clip it. Next I uncleat the furling line and rotate the shroud CW, taking up the furling line on the spool until a few feet extend beyond the cleat (experiment to find the right amount). Now I cleat the line, unclip the clew, and attach my jib sheets (you may want to take another wrap or two around the shroud to tighten the roll). To unfurl the jib, uncleat the furling line and pull on the leeward sheet; this should take up more of the line until its end is close to the cleat. To furl the jib, uncleat the sheet and pull on the furling line. I always try to keep balancing tension on the lines so the furler drum doesn't get fouled by a slack line.

Hope this helps,

Cheers, Steve


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 Post subject: Solo Mast raising
PostPosted: Thu Jun 24, 2004 7:05 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 6:25 pm
Posts: 35
Location: Hudson, FL
I currently and have always raised my catamaran masts solo. I tie a line about 5 feet from the mast base with a clove hitch, and string it through a loop on the trailers mast support and then back through a jib cleat, (Sharing the space). When I have lifted the mast upright, I simply pull the line tight into the cleat and jump off and secure the jib to the furler. Then when all hooked I simply uncleat the line, pull it all loose and go tighten things up.

For a tent, I have had a loop sewn into the center of a rain fly from a coleman tent that uses a colapsable fiberglass rod in the center and elastic cords with hooks on four corners and hoist it up using the main halyard, hooking the four corners to the wings or edges of the tramp if I want more coverage. I have pics of my design if wanted.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2004 7:34 am 
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clarsen123 wrote:
Another question about righting. Will I be able to right the Getaway solo at 190 lbs?


I am not able to right mine at 170lbs (I have the smaller bob). This was in little to no wind.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`

On a side note. Hello everyone. I have had my Getaway since it came out in 2001. I have thoroughly enjoyed it, but have yet taken it for a sail this year as my crew is 7 months pregnant right now.

I am a complete novice and have had some great spills (turtled it a few times). Looking forward to gaining some knowledge from you guys.


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 Post subject: Righting the Getaway
PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2004 5:21 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2003 1:26 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Morehead City, NC
I have righted mine twice by myself, I weigh 160. She popped right over when I turned her into the wind.


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 Post subject: Useful thread
PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 8:56 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2004 8:42 am
Posts: 2
Location: Michigan
Great discussion here - helped me decide to take the plunge. Picked up a 2001 Getaway in great shape a couple weeks ago. I'm pretty new to sailing and Hobies - have sailed a friend's H14 without much trouble and gotten rides on a 16 & 18 (with a trap ride, but not much hull flying).

I found the Getaway a breeze to rig and sail from the get-go. Nice speed and stability. Great payload (had 6 adults & 1 teen - and no wind!) and plenty of space for comfort. Agree that jibing is more efficient than tacking if done with care. Trick for a successful tack for me was releasing the mainsheet when crossing the wind then sheeting in as soon as I moved over, then resetting the jib. May not be the quickest tack but it keeps me out of irons!

V-Ray11 - I saw your boat/trailer mods - very cool! Question about the mast step pulley: is it fixed or does it swing? Does the bracketing prevent side-swinging of the mast? Could a pulley on a rope tied to the mast support work as well? I have a slightly different trailer but could see some similar mods working for me.

Looking forward to hearing more from others.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 04, 2004 8:11 am 
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The manual states that too much mast rake (aft) will make it more difficult to tack. (p10 - no version or date on the manual).


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2004 6:19 am 
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Posts: 10
Scott wrote:
And no pitch pole!


Yesterday (Aug 8, 2004), on southeast lake michigan, 3 foot waves, me and my 11 year old son on the wing, broad reach, 12-14 mph (gps), burried the windward hull's bow in a wave, and the next thing we knew, we were swimming. I'd call that a pitch pole. How we didn't get hurt is amazing.

I've never righted a getaway before, but we were only 1/4 mile from shore so I was not in a panic. My son stayed in the water while I stood on the bow. The boat turned automatically, which was nice. I then pulled on the righting line and within seconds the boat rightied itself and flipped all the way over on its other side.

I then unhooked the main sheet from the sail and uncleated the jib sheet. I was going to furl it too, but the furler line was a tangled mess. I then repeated the procedure of standing on the bow, but nothing happened. I then got my son to stand on the front hull too. The whole hull went underwater, the stern lifted in the air and we both went swimming again. But, the boat was turned into the wind again. I climbed back on (third time) and pulled the righting line and we were upright again.

We have a line with a loop in it for climbing back on. That helped especially since we were tired by this point. After a brief nap on the tramp to get our breath back, we sailed a bit slower back to shore and enjoyed the sunshine, the sand, and the people we had been entertaining for the last 20 minutes.

In retrospect, if the boat had stayed up the first time, with the mainsheet and jib lines set hard, I think the boat would have sailed to Chicago without us.

My muscles are sore.

- John


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2004 9:43 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2004 1:26 pm
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Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Sounds fun. I'm glad nobody was hurt. Unsheeting the main and jib is one of the first things you do when attempting to right a capsized catamaran. You're lucky it didn't sail off without you, but it might have eventually pointed into the wind and stalled, or just tipped back over. It might have been a long swim to catch up though, regardless. I'm also glad to hear that if the wind is sufficient to tip you over, then it's also sufficient to assist in righting it. That's been a question lying heavily on my mind since I got mine. Thanks for sharing. I believe strongly in practicing righting to better handle the unexpected dumpings.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2004 9:57 am 
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Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 8:55 pm
Posts: 113
Location: Saint Albans Bay, Vermont
Sorry, the no pitch pole statement was sort of a relative term. Compared to my H16, I can bury the hulls of my Getaway while flying a hull and not be as concerned. I too have come close to going over on my Getaway, but it was only when sailing hard. In fact, just last weekend I took a buddy out for his first time (never sailed before) and we came close to pitchpolling several times. To show how easy it was to sail, after about 10 minutes he wanted to skipper. I reluctantly gave him the controls and he caught on beautifully. In fact, he got a longer run flying the hull than I did that day! Of course this guy races motorcross so he absolutely has no fear! It was a first time for me too that day. I have never been on my Getaway while flying a hull and not being in control! It was quite a ride! Near the end of the day, we decided to make one more hi speed run across the bay before going in. Of course by this time, I couldn't get him to give up the controls. As we got up to speed, I noticed 2 large Boston Whalers cruising across our path. The wake these boats created was quite remarkable, and we came up on them fast. All I had time to do was to look back at my friend who had a sadistic grin on his face. I muttered out a Oh Sh**! HANG ON! as we flew over them. As a lake goer, I have never seen swells before like this (can't imagine you guys out on the ocean like that!) usually the bigest waves I ever go through are from 1-2 foot chop. These swells were a good 6 feet, and we sailed through them like they weren't there. As we emerged from the other side, I have to say it was the scariest and most exciting time so far on my Getaway.

I don't have an answer to totally preventing pitchpoling, I guess moving aft will help some. Does mast rake have an influence? Can someone help JohnHauck with this subject?

Scott


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2004 2:40 pm 
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Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Awesome! BTW, I was referring to righting solo. Anyway, yes mast rake does make a huge difference in pitchpoling. The more vertical the mast, the more torque is pushing your bow down. Moving aft is definitely one solution. Did you get both hulls flying when you hit a six foot wave at speed? I still have never flown a hull. Can someone tell me how to go about that? Is it just a balancing act between the hotstick and the mainsheet? I've tipped my Wave several times, but never the Getaway. It happens so catastrophically, I can't see how one can ride that razor's edge for more than a second. I would REALLY like to fly a hull, especially when I blaze past my monoslow buddies. :twisted:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2004 3:33 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2004 9:32 pm
Posts: 198
Location: West Texas
Visiting from the H16 forum here... I dunno about Wave VS. H14 but my buddy who has sailed the 14 a bunch said it was hard for him to get a hull up and keep it there without capsizing, but just yesterday I was (solo) tacking back and forth in 20mph winds across Lake Nasworthy with my butt 3-6' in the air the whole time. (I was getting up the nerve for an intentional capsize. LOL )
When I did capsize I stood on the bow for a minute to try and get the boat to swing around but it just sort of drifted downwind without pivoting so I had to swim it around to face into the wind. I could get the mast up out of the water solo but I couldn't totally right the boat; wound up soliciting help at the righting line from a guy passing by in a speedboat.

Guess I'll have to get a righting bag. 8)

Jim


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