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PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 1:05 am 
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Note: This is a three part article on the Hobie i12s inflatable. Part 1 is about portability -- unpacking and packing http://www.hobiecat.com/community/viewtopic.php?t=7633 . Part 2 shows the boat's features. Part 3 talks about on the water performance: http://www.hobiecat.com/community/viewt ... 37c7fbf866


Part 2: Features and more options.

This is mostly a photo essay showing some of the detail on the i12s. So without further ado, lets get started!

Looking forward, notice the 8" Twist-N-Seal hatch
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Inside the forward compartment, you're looking at a rib from the center bladder that helps shape the bow:
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Water drain plug drains the plenum between the bladders just in case of an outer breach (or open hatch):
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Mast step, with downhaul hook:
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The Drivewell cassette is one of the really slick features. Just drop your Drive in and spring loaded levers lock it in place. Fast, easy and secure. This unit is made of high temp, high impact Polycarbonate and welded securely to the fabric. Very solid!
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Drivewell plug is included. Notice the little handle:
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The seat is actually adjustable fore and aft so it will fit virtually anyone of any size. It is similar to the current Hobie seat, but has an even thicker seat bottom to keep your butt off the deck. This front view shows the adjustable forward anchor strap:
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Seat, rear view with 2 anchor straps. Just aft of the seat are two scupper holes with plugs. The boat was so dry that I never used them, but I'm getting ahead of myself here.
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Another ingenious feature is the second generation Twist-N-Stow rudder system seen here on the starboard side. Simply pull on the red handle to raise the rudder and lock the line in the built in clam cleat. Once you get used to it, it is slick and easy. Looking aft, note the rudder is up:
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Rudder down position:
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"Tiller" located on the usual port side. Simply rotate the knob in the direction you want to turn. Boat handles are well positioned and handy.
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Paddle anchor also showing a good close-up of the Denier 1000 fabric:
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Nozzles for the 3 air bladders. Under each of the protective plugs is a valve -- just push and rotate to lock and let all the air out in a hurry. During inflation, the valves operate automatically with your pump. It's amazingly easy and foolproof!
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Rudder area. The boat comes with the standard Hobie rudder, but can accommodate the larger (old style) sailing rudder. By now, you've probably noticed that all the rudder lines are sealed in these tubes. No binding -- everything operated smoothly.
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Looking aft, you see how large the cargo deck is. Plenty of room for diving gear, kids or whatever. In this view you get a good view of the handles and triangular "padeyes"(?) for the sail shrouds.
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Included is this 4 part paddle -- very easy to pack:
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This bottom view shows the cart mount. Notice the drive can remain installed with the cart, but the fins must be retracted or straight down. You can wheel the boat right into the water, then lift the bow to drop the cart away (it floats). Note the scupper holes just aft and the keel strip for protection:
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The sail is identical to the small sail, but the mast is a 3 piece unit connected with a long internal bungee that keeps it together. Also unique, there are 3 stays that support the mast in a conventional manner:
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I left the boat inflated to check the pressure over night for any loss due to leakage or cooler temperature. Here the boat is loaded and ready to head out in the morning!
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That wraps up part two. In part three, I'll report on the performance. 8)


Last edited by Roadrunner on Thu Aug 23, 2007 9:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 7:58 am 
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Location: Jacksonville, Fla
Great review........

Thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 9:20 am 
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Location: Novato, CA
I'll start by saying awesome review and photos.

I do have a question regarding the three stays that come off the mast, how are they attached and do you have a photo?

I am considering doing the same thing and also want to use the forward stay with a jib.

If you have any photos or comments it would be great.

Thank you.


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 Post subject: Stays
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 4:34 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jul 08, 2007 8:52 am
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Location: Boynton Beach
You might want to take look at the way I have mine rigged.

Image
Image

The trick is attachment points on the sail. I used goop to attach some strap material a couple feet from the top of the sail with a loop of rope inside the strap for the side stays, then tied quick disconnects on the two rope stays that clip to the loop of rope on the sail. Two cleats are placed on the gunwales about 6" behind the mast. If you make your jib the right size, all you have to do for the fore stay is clip to the loop at the top of the sail and run the stay through the bow eye. I bring the rope stay back to a cleat beside the seat so I can adjust the tension on the fly or bring the jib in if the winds get too strong. You can't bring the jib down, but you can bring it back to the mast where you can, at least, bunch it up till you can get to land and take it down.

It works very well and rigs quickly. My jib has a wire luff and clips to the rope fore stay, but you could also use a sleeved jib. You could also use PVC for a stiffer fore stay - the jib might actually hold a better shape with a PVC fore stay or a rope fore stay running through a length of PVC.

Ted


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 Post subject: stays
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 4:38 pm 
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Actually, I just hook the jib with wire luff directly to the top of the sail and have a rope tied to the bottom of the sail and running through the bow eye and back to the seat.

Ted


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 9:28 pm 
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Location: Escondido
Damien wrote:
I do have a question regarding the three stays that come off the mast, how are they attached and do you have a photo?

Hi Damien and thanks. The first picture shows the starboard "chainplate". the 15th pic, "Looking aft" shows both plates in the foreground. The forestay uses the bow padeye.

In addition to TJ's cleats, padeyes would also work for the shrouds as long as they are well secured and backed through the hull. 8)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 9:58 am 
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Roadrunner and TJ thank you for your advice and answers; although, is it possible to get a picture of the attachement point on the sail for the two side stays?


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 Post subject: Here you go
PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 6:48 pm 
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Image
Image

I don't think you really need these with just the stock sail. And, they take away the ability to roll the sail up on the mast, unless you disconnect them.

I use them because I got caught a long way from port in Florida Bay in strong wind and feared that the mast would break, and because I added a jib sail.

Ted


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2007 9:51 am 
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Location: Novato, CA
Perfect! Those are the exact photos I was looking for and yes you are right I don't need them all of the time.

But with adding a Jib as you stated and the fact that I like to go out the Golden Gate and out into the ocean where the wind and conditions are rough it is nice to have the option of adding extra strength.

Thank you for your help, comments and time.


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 Post subject: side stays
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2007 11:55 am 
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If you use goop, like I did, to fasten the strapping material, make sure you clamp it or put weight on it and let it set up over night. Leave enough room in the front of the strap for your rope or disconnect to go in. I have two hook up locations only because I use it on my sea kayak and the fore stay hooks up lower than the top of the mast. The goop will not let go of the material, so be sure about where you want to place it.

Ted


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