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PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 2:00 pm 
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Location: Eagan (St Paul), MN
Hey,

I've been using the EZ step mast stepper. I'm not that fond of the gin pole on the main cross bar set up and, in general, the time to clip everything together. Additionally, recently when I was using the EZ step to lower the mast, the clip on the end of my winch line opened and the mast fell about 10 feet - fortunately neither the mast nor anyone else was injured. However, I've been searching for a better way. (I've got Hobie Bob atop the mast so that is adding some weight). Anyway, I saw an interesting post from CatSailor (copied below). This appears not to require a gin pole: anyone done this? Do you still need to somehow stabilize the mast using the trap wires? Here's the quote:

"Raising the mast solo is quite easy. I added a cleat on the side of the mast about 2 feet up from the base to help. Prior to stepping the mast, take the main halyard and attach it to one of the bow bridal cleats. Step the mast, pull in the slack on the main halyard and cleat if off to the mast cleat, then you can safely attach the forstay. "

Other ideas? I give considered using the system whereby you add a pulley to the top of the vertical bar on the trailer and skip the gin pole: however, the vertical pole on my trailer is not tall enough to get the pulley 30" above the forward cross bar as the instructions suggest: which means I'd need a welder to work on my trailer. Any experts out there with some advice?

Thanks!

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H17S, Hobie Bravo, A cat
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 12:44 pm 
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Location: Tri-Cities, WA
The Quote, "Raising the mast solo is quite easy. I added a cleat on the side of the mast about 2 feet up from the base to help. Prior to stepping the mast, take the main halyard and attach it to one of the bow bridal cleats. Step the mast, pull in the slack on the main halyard and cleat if off to the mast cleat, then you can safely attach the forstay. " is mine. You do not need any additional stabilization, but you must be able to lift (pivit) the mast up by your own strength (I'm 6'1" - 220 lbs and have no bob), then cleat off the main halyard. :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:19 pm 
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Location: Eagan (St Paul), MN
Sorry about the quote misattribution.

Since I'm 5'10", 160lbs, have Hobie Bob atop and am built like an office worker (ie. gangly and strongest muscle = typing fingers) - this may be a solution better suited to others. Thanks for the follow up.

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e-mail: ab at medjet.net
H17S, Hobie Bravo, A cat
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 6:15 pm 
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Location: little Washington, NC
I have a HC16 but the principle is the same. I added another section to my trailer mast support that hinges so it can be stowed (my support is a channel and my extension is a section of (Lowes) fence pole, which nests nicely when stowed.) This additional section pivots on bolt that mounts in a hole that I drilled in the trailer mast support about 6" down from the top. I added a stay from the top of the extension to the trailer tongue since the weight of the mast buckled the first (thin walled) extension I built. A pulley is mounted to the top of the extension.

I attach two black rubber bungees (actually had to hook two together to get the correct length/tension) between the trap wires and the front corners of the frame/forward pylons to keep the mast from swinging sideways. I run the winch rope through the mast support pulley to the Aussie jib halyard (MAKE SURE the winch rope is long enough and halyard short enough so you don't try to winch a shackle or a bowlin through a small pulley- I tried to do that once :oops: )

While I can winch the mast up from resting on the rear frame, I use a little crutch that I set on the rear cross bar to lift the mast up just a little to get things started.

Anyway, this works great, allows me to step the mast singlehanded, and the extension stows out of the way- the only additional equipment needed are the bungees. One other caution- make sure the boat is still tied down to the trailer so it will not slide/roll forward.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 7:05 pm 
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Location: Eagan (St Paul), MN
Thanks aschaffter, those are some good ideas. If you ever get a chance to send/post pictures, I'd love to see them....

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e-mail: ab at medjet.net
H17S, Hobie Bravo, A cat
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 7:18 pm 
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bock1 wrote:
Thanks aschaffter, those are some good ideas. If you ever get a chance to send/post pictures, I'd love to see them....


Should be raising the mast tomorrow in the driveway (not sailing- too hot and no wind here in NC lately) and will take and post pics if I remember.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 5:05 pm 
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Location: little Washington, NC
I took ideas from the various stepping systems and came up with my own rig for stepping the mast on the trailer. It centers around a folding extension I added to the trailer's mast support.

Here is my trailer's mast support. I nested a lightweight galvanized steel fence pole in the support channel. It pivots on the bolt that is about 8" down from the mast cradle.
Image

Here is the extension erected. Not visible is a small clevis pin I insert to keep the pole vertical when there is no load on it. After buckling my first pole, I added a stay that connects to the tongue to brace the pole.


Image

A pulley and the stay attach to the top of pole.

Image

I use a carabiner clip to temporarily attach the stay to the trailer chain.

Image

I use rubber bungees attached at the frame corners and to trap wires to support the mast laterally while I am raising it.

Edit: The bungees deteriorated quickly, I even had one break so replaced them with fixed lengths of cable with hooks on each end- I attach end to a trap thimble and the other end over the cross bar and hooks onto the end of the dolphin striker. Determine the length with the mast up.


Image

While the height of the pole provides enough angle for the winch rope/jib halyard to lift the mast, as a safety measure I usually temporarily support the mast with a small piece of board to increase the angle slightly.
Image

Here the mast is almost all the way up. You can see that I attach the winch rope to the Aussie jib halyard. I sometimes need to help the mast base into the step with a slight push. It looks like the extension pole is bending, but that is caused by my wide angle camera lens.

Image

With this simple, inexpensive, rig I can easily and safely raise and lower the mast singlehandedly. Everything stows neatly out of the way when trailering the boat.


Last edited by aschaffter on Mon Sep 01, 2008 2:05 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:37 pm 
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Great pictures! Thanks.

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H17S, Hobie Bravo, A cat
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 Post subject: Question
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2007 7:10 pm 
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Location: Melbourne, Florida USA
aschaffter, what length are the bungees that you use?



Eric


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 Post subject: Re: Question
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2007 9:14 pm 
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surfrider wrote:
aschaffter, what length are the bungees that you use?

Eric


I am now using two 21" EDPM rubber bungees on each side. I hook them to the dolphin striker rod, wrap them inside the pylon, under the tramp, up along the outside of the side rails, and hook them to the trap wire thimbles.

The bungees are actually longer than 21" but that is what it says on the rubber part. You will need to see what length bungee works for you. I am using solid black rubber bungees, but you could also use fabric covered stranded bungees as long as they provide enough tension so the mast doesn't sway side to side.

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'86 H16, Sail #89057


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2007 9:30 am 
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Location: Upstate, South Carolina
Hi all!
Is this OK for the jib halyard to be used it as a hoist rope all the time?

Before a friend of mine welded guides and set up a roller on top of the mast support I was using jib halyard as a host rope, but it did not seem right.

Now I use forestay to winch the mast up. Then I devised a system (rather contraption) with two blocks that I use to pull the forestay down to the bridles. At the same time I release the winch. So mast stays up, and the end of the forestay goes down from the top of the mast support.

It is complicated :shock: compared to raising the mast with jib halyard, hooking up the forestay and then releasing the halyard from the winch.

Should I stop using contraption and start using jib halyard? :roll:

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2007 10:49 am 
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I use the halyard to hoist my mast (see pics above) all the time, and see no problem with it. It sounds easier than what you are doing.

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'86 H16, Sail #89057


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 5:06 pm 
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Loads can't be any more then what they would be while under tension and while sailing. I don't see anything wrong with it.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:08 pm 
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EVERYBODY (who uses mechanical assistance) uses a pair of trap wires to hoist H18 and H20 masts. That leaves the forestay "loose" for easier pinning to the bridle.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 9:01 pm 
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I must have been an idiot or really lucky....

All I did on my '86 17 was tie a line between the end of the halyard and the mast crutch, throw the mast in the air, tie the other end of the halyard off on the mast rotator then jump down and fasten the bridles. Never dropped the mast once.

Of course, that was back when I was in my 20's. Masts do seem heavier now.

Brian C


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