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 Post subject: Single AI Trailer tips
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 5:51 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2008 6:10 pm
Posts: 46
Location: Brisbane, Australia
I have just picked up my new AI here in Australia after buying a used jet-ski trailer and having a friend do the modifications to suit, that is remove old ramps and winch etc, add cross bars at 67 inch spacing, bolt cradles to crossbars, fix lighting - you get the picture (if i can work out how to attach - you really will). The trailer was built to allow the AI to fit easily in my garage (leave the car out in driveway) and to assist with that the dolly wheel was cut down to still be usable even with the front of hull being close to the front of trailer.

Anyhoo the crux of this topic is to WARN other trailer builders that the front cradle needs to be lifted some 1 to 2 inches to keep the hull from touching the trailer frame - basically the front cradle crossbar should be of a bigger size (height wise) than the rear to compensate for the rear height of cradle shaped for main hull. I ended up having to put a timber wedge in between the front crossbar and the trailer frame to keep the hull away from the drawbar.

This wont be a problem for trailers built for 2 x AIs as the main hull9s) will be offset from the drawbar.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 2:25 pm 
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Location: Dublin, Ireland
Good man i tri so you're ready to roll now. Nothing like a bit of ingenuity and plenty of it around here from what I read.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 5:01 pm 
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Location: Brisbane, Australia
Yeah, went out Sunday afternoon on Bramble Bay, very ligtht winds SW/SE, max speed 5mph on GPS, i was happy with the tacking ability of the AI, that is the going about part - no need to use the mirage drive at all, but i am not too sure of pointing (into the wind ability - but light winds probably affect any sailcraft pointing ability?) and the tide was coming in against the tack. I guess i will find out when sailing against other sail craft when i join my local club (on Lake Samsonvale).

The trailer works great at the boat ramps, slides off and on pretty easily, i am able to do myself no worries, i just have to invest in some new tie-down straps as the style i have at present work themselves loose when trailering over bumpy roads. Probably because they are not pulling down but pulling up.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 1:46 am 
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Location: Dublin, Ireland
I too was out on Sunday with the winds gusting 20 knots and white caps on the waves. Performance upwind was staggering but I found it difficult to tack off the wind. It seemed the AI preferred to sail head on or downwind with small variations. Pedallng did afford me an extra 5 or 7 degrees but I need to investigate and experiment further.

The handling in the waves was fantastic and surfing downwind was exhilarating. Not having one batten meant the sail leached quite a bit and gave the impression of luffing. The acceleration when gusts hit was amazing....a case of hold on for dear life and on occasion, I lost my nerve and came off the wind to decelerate.

All and all, a right old blast!

I now need to better understand the sailing characteristics.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2008 6:09 am 
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Location: Brisbane, Australia
That burst of speed you mention is what i am waiting for, plus the downwind surfing of swells. How fast (and how wet) was the trip. Did you furl the sail at all? I am tied up for a week so cant get out - just have to content myself with the read.

As for tacking to get the best from tacking angles, point up until you start luffing with sail fairly tight, then bear away a little until both tell tales stream freely. As wind picks up try pointing higher. Another consideration is that often you can get a wind lift on a particular tack, and conversley the opposite tack can reduce tack angle.

Looking forward to hearing some more soon.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 05, 2008 3:55 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2007 2:25 pm
Posts: 1966
Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
Upyaboya wrote:
The acceleration when gusts hit was amazing....a case of hold on for dear life and on occasion, I lost my nerve and came off the wind to decelerate.

I know exactly what you mean Brian! :wink: I experienced just that the other day in winds of around 25 knots with much stronger gusts!
My GPS registered 16kmh (9.9mph) my fastest speed yet. If my nerve had been greater I would have had more sail out and my top speed would have been higher I'm sure!

i tri- Welcome! Yakaholic posted some interesting speed details here:
http://www.hobiecat.com/community/viewtopic.php?t=7197
Looks like about 60% of wind speed can be expected depending on the swell.
Reconlon and Roadrunner have also posted detailed speed data found here:
http://www.hobiecat.com/community/viewtopic.php?t=7127


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 2:57 pm 
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Location: Dublin, Ireland
Sorry for the delay, I've been travelling but now I'm back, it's raining and I went out this evening and it was blowing very hard, force 6 with good sized waves.

My GPS registered 11 knots surfing the waves ...that's when I could see it and as I came off the wind it seemed to go faster but to be honest, I was too busy holding on to check.

I noticed that a number of sailboats had capsized and mindful of someone's advice to watch out for broaching waves, I started to use the waves and surf for quite a while. This required constant minor movements ofn the rudder and occasionally, the bow would bury itself in the sea and take an age to come up again. It was a fantastic experience but I did find myself wondering if I would capsize.

Cowardice had me furl in the sail to the first batten for the upwind leg but I hadn't cleated it peoperly and it soon unfurled and I left it there with ni ill effects other than lots of chop and water spraying in my face.

Again, I marvelled at this AI and in particular, the responsiveness of the rudder in medium sized seas. I still await replacement battens and some proper tell tales but I can feel the wind much better with the sheet in my hand constantly making adjustments.

A wet but most exhilerating ride!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 3:01 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 08, 2008 3:29 pm
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Location: Dublin, Ireland
Correction guys, I mean 11 mph not knots.

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 Post subject: Speed at last
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 4:58 am 
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Location: Brisbane, Australia
HI all respondents
i went out yesterday afternoon, 10 - 15 knots SW with some stronger gusts, saw 8.5 mph on the GPS, probably more some other times but the GPS was a BIT WET, in fact i was a bit wet as well, funny it doesnt seen to bother you though. Might have to invest in a wetsuit for the cooler times.

When i first unfurled the sail the wind was at its strongest and i struggled with weather helm, or so i thought, but on reflection later, remembered i might have turned the tiller joystick the wrong way - old dinghy sailing habit.

When derigging i noticed the mast well half full of water - is this normal when getting a soaking??


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 7:03 am 
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Location: Virginia Beach, Va.
Quote:
When derigging i noticed the mast well half full of water - is this normal when getting a soaking??
No it should have been all the way full and probably was until you pulled the mast. :wink:
gwiz


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2008 4:43 pm 
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Location: Brisbane, Australia
Thanks gwiz, all the way full you say, must mean i was laying off too much for the mast well to be only half full - or as you say was full until pulling the mast.

I ended up sponging out the water with a big piece of foam and thought may as well use the wet sponge to wipe down the bird crap that had landed on my car at the boat ramp, then :oops: i remembered that it is salt water :oops: so quickly washed over car with a bucket of fresh water.

To get out the remaining salt water in the mast well i used a set of metal tongs (used for cooking) to hold a folded kitchen sponge in place and was able to get right down into well.


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