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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:21 pm 
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That is basically the method suggested in the Hobie 17 manual. However, if you're not on the trailer, you can also connect the main halyard to one of the bow tangs. Hoist the mast and tie off. Connect one of the bridals and then release the main halyard. Then connect the other bridal. The mast only needs one bridal connected to stay upright.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 4:50 pm 
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One of the guys in my fleet has a small block mounted at the base of his mast crutch. He just ties a line off to the forestay and runs it to a jib cleat. Lift up the mast, cleat the line, pin the forestay. Pretty simple and good idea I thought.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 9:15 am 
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I do the same except i use the trap line to a bock then to a cleat on the cross bar.
That leaves the for stay ready to hook up when you climb down off the boat.

If you use the same method to take the mast down, then as you release the forstay you can bungee it to the mast and it will be ready and handy for attaching when you put the mast back up.

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Hobie Tiger
Wind in your sails, water in your shoes, great day!


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 1:06 pm 
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All of these are good ideas. If I were younger and more energetic I would hoist it up in a flash using one of these methods without all the rigging I have.

I made my rig because I am rapidly approaching 60 and lifting the mast is getting to be a pain. My setup is slower, but I can take my time, don't have to climb on the tramp, walk the mast up/down, and don't need to worry about dropping it or having a line slip out of my hands.

One note about my rig- I am using two bungees from each trap wire to each front pylon.

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Alan
'86 H16, Sail #89057


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2008 1:26 pm 
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Hey aschaffter I am interested in doing the same thing on my trailer so I can easily raise my mast for my 14T. I am just looking for a little more information so I know exactly what I need to buy. Once you have the pole system all set up for the mast support do you just attach the with line to the jib halyard with a carabiner and then once it is up in place rig the boat? Also my mast support on our trailer isn't totally on a 90 degree angle going straight up it is angled forward a little, do you think that will affect anything? Thanks a bunch!


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2008 8:33 pm 
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MisterSteve124 wrote:
Hey aschaffter I am interested in doing the same thing on my trailer so I can easily raise my mast for my 14T. I am just looking for a little more information so I know exactly what I need to buy. Once you have the pole system all set up for the mast support do you just attach the with line to the jib halyard with a carabiner and then once it is up in place rig the boat? Also my mast support on our trailer isn't totally on a 90 degree angle going straight up it is angled forward a little, do you think that will affect anything? Thanks a bunch!


More info:


I run a short cable from the tip of my folding support extension to the tongue chain on the trailer- if I didn't do this my light weight extension would buckle from the strain of raising the mast.

The winch rope has a carabiner on the end which I clip to the end of the jib halyard (lower block on Aussie rig).

I shorten and cleat off the jib halyard so it isn't so long that it is pulled into the winch.

Once the mast is up, I attach the forestay then loosen the winch and un-tension the jib halyard so I can pull it back down where I can reach it.

My mast cradle slopes forward towards the car also. No effect.

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Alan
'86 H16, Sail #89057


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2008 10:04 pm 
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aschaffter wrote:

More info:

I shorten and cleat off the jib halyard so it isn't so long that it is pulled into the winch.

Once the mast is up, I attach the forestay then loosen the winch and un-tension the jib halyard so I can pull it back down where I can reach it.


I don't think I really get the above parts. Maybe its a little different because I have a 14.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2008 4:15 am 
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Location: little Washington, NC
MisterSteve124 wrote:
aschaffter wrote:

More info:

I shorten and cleat off the jib halyard so it isn't so long that it is pulled into the winch.

Once the mast is up, I attach the forestay then loosen the winch and un-tension the jib halyard so I can pull it back down where I can reach it.


I don't think I really get the above parts. Maybe its a little different because I have a 14.


I have an Aussie jib halyard but it would be the same with a standard halyard. I attached the winch rope to the sail head end and cleat off the other end on the mast. Just so I don't have too much halyard I haul in the halyard a little bit so it is about half way between full down and full up.

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'86 H16, Sail #89057


Last edited by aschaffter on Wed Aug 13, 2008 6:30 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2008 7:20 am 
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ok I think maybe this weekend we will buy the parts and start getting it set up. Thanks for your help I'll let you know how it goes.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2008 5:37 pm 
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Location: Charleston SC
look y'all I think you are making this more complicated than needed. The simplest and easiest way is to disconnect the mast from the boat and lay it on the beach. Take the boat off the trailer and with beach wheels find a nice spot on the beach to step the mast. Clear the area of beach goers just to be safe. Rerig the mast. Turn the boat stern to the wind or if no wind, aim the bows down towards the water. The mast isnt that heavy. With the boat on the ground it is easy to walk the mast up, step up unto the tramp and stand it up. The wind or slope of the beach will assist you until the fore stay is connected. But mind the mast, hold the fore stay taught. I have done this a 100 times solo. No fancy gadget rigging.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2008 6:27 pm 
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swc wrote:
look y'all I think you are making this more complicated than needed. The simplest and easiest way is to disconnect the mast from the boat and lay it on the beach. Take the boat off the trailer and with beach wheels find a nice spot on the beach to step the mast. Clear the area of beach goers just to be safe. Rerig the mast. Turn the boat stern to the wind or if no wind, aim the bows down towards the water. The mast isnt that heavy. With the boat on the ground it is easy to walk the mast up, step up unto the tramp and stand it up. The wind or slope of the beach will assist you until the fore stay is connected. But mind the mast, hold the fore stay taught. I have done this a 100 times solo. No fancy gadget rigging.


All fine unless you . . . .
(1) are an older, over 60 sailor who doesn't like to be tired before ever sailing.
(2) don't have the strength and desire to do the old "clean and jerk."
(3) don't have a beach where you launch, but instead must step the mast while the boat is on the trailer.

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Alan
'86 H16, Sail #89057


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 5:51 am 
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Location: Charleston SC
ok, Alan, I understand. That is great you are sailing. I hope I will be also when I am +60. That's a great place to sail, Lil'wash, my family is from Edenton.

Have a Hobie day


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2008 12:05 pm 
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Location: Lake Worth, FL
One thing I do not understand how to step mast by yourself, is how to get the mast in place to put in step pin? Do people make a stand or something?
CP

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2008 5:09 pm 
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Location: Jersey Shore
Quote:
One thing I do not understand how to step mast by yourself, is how to get the mast in place to put in step pin? Do people make a stand or something?


It is a little tricky, but luckily the 17 mast isn't too heavy. You would have to stand up on the tramp and slide the mast back until it is out of the front cradle on the trailer. Then set it down so it balances on the front crossbar (if you're worried about scratching the aluminum, you can put down a towel). Go to the back of the boat (tip of the mast) and slide the mast until the mast base is right at the front crossbar. Put the mast in the rear trailer support to use as a pivot point. Swing the mast base over until it lines up with the step and push forward. Once the mast is engaged in the step, it'll say there as long as it doesn't bounce backward. Walk forward to drop the step pin in, jump up on the tramp, and step the mast.

sm


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2009 10:31 pm 
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Just some follow up on what I ended up doing. Of note, this applies to stepping the mast when the boat is on the trailer (off the trailer walking the mast up is easy; for some people, lifting the mast from the tramp on trailer is easy - but not for my back and office worker arms).

I essentially use the halyard as suggested by other posts but I bought a tripod that removes the need to do the first hard lift of the mast off of the tramp :

Three things are needed:
1. If not already present, you need to put a cleat at the base of the mast.
(ie. http://www.murrays.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=MS&Product_Code=01-1019&Category_Code=
2. You need a tripod (shown below)
3. You need to use the mail sail halyard line (this will hold the mast up while you go around to connect the forestay)


Tripod that I purchased: (except I took off the horizontal bars below the top bar):

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/407160-REG/On_Stage_LS7805B_Power_Crank_Up_Lighting_Stand_.html

The tripod is nice to have anyway because you can rest the mast on it while getting ready to step.

Step:
1. With the boat on the trailer, get the mast ready to step: the mast pin in place at the mast base, and the mast tip pointing behind the boat (resting on the tripod).
2. Take the twist shackle at the end of the halyard line and attach it to the bridle wires (front of boat). [When the mast is upright, the halyard will be fixed to the bridle wires and then follow its normal course over the top of the mast, then down the mast under the pulley at the mast base and onto the tramp.]
3. Move the tripod so it is supporting the mast fairly close to the back of the trampoline.
4. Turn the crank on the tripod and raise the mast up to 7 to 10 feet. [Note: I put a life jacket over the horizontal tripod bar to keep it from scratching the mast.] Then get up on the tramp; lift the mast the rest of the way. It is not particularly difficult to lift once the tripod has elevated it. Once it is vertical, continue to lean forward into it but it will be quite stable there.
5. With one hand, reach down onto the tramp and grab the loose end of the halyard line coming from the base of the mast and pull it tight so that it is pulling on the bridle wires. When this line is tight, it will support the mast.
6. Cleat this line to the mast cleat.
7. Get off the boat, go forward and attach the forestay.
8. Release the halyard.

The downside of this method is the need to purchase a tripod: but it folds up nicely and helps hold the mast when it's dangling out behind the boat so I like it for that as well.
The benefit is that you don't need to deal with ropes/bungees to deal with side-to-side mast sway during mast lift and you're not using any particularly fancy contraptions that are time consuming to set up (aka the old "mast stepper" gin pole contraptions).

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Adam
e-mail: ab at medjet.net
H17S, Hobie Bravo, A cat
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