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PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2008 4:26 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 19, 2008 6:06 pm
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Location: Borrego Springs CA
more precisely... how to avoid it
I read the info here and tried to read the Hobie U .pdf but couldn't find reference to it

I already know how to get it upright again after only two times out :P

my questions is... when you are up on one hull and feel like you are going over, do you turn upwind or downwind or neither?

Is it like a car where if you were on two wheels and turned in the direction of the lifted side you flip it?

thanks!


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2008 1:08 pm 
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Location: South Florida
Steve.

As you start flying a hull, the way to bring it back down is to dump some/all of the air out of the main. The 2 ways to do this is let the main out and/or turn up into the wind.

There are a couple of gotchas here. With the Bravo, at a certain point the rudder is out of the water, so you will lose your ability to turn. The second is when your hull is really up there, it is catching the wind also and you can be pushed over that way also.

One time when I reached that point were it was going over, I let go of the main sheet and tiller and hiked out as much as possible, putting my arms over my head. I was surprised the boat didn't go over. I figure the reason was the gust let up. If the wind was constant, I would have gone swimming again.

If the wind is just to overpowering, reef some of the main in to get control back. That's the one thing you can do on the Bravo real easy.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2008 1:46 pm 
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Hey thanks for the reply!

I got a lot to learn aobut sailing but so far it is a blast!

thanks again!


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2008 9:31 am 
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Location: Santa Clara, CA
I started sailing by taking lessons in a dinghy in a local lake. Then I regularly rented dinghys there. One time I was out with a girl and she said, "sailing is hard work, huh," and I realized that it was--I was having to release the sail every few seconds to keep us from going over with each gust, then pull the sail back in a few seconds later. It was getting to be more work than fun.

Then, from reading in this forum, I learned how people "pinch" in such situations...that is, steer the boat slightly into the wind when this happens. From a physics standpoint, this seems counterintuitive, since it will make it easier for your boat's momentum to carry it all the way over. But this is more than made up for by the reduction in force on the sail, caused by it having a shallower angle to the wind. I tried doing this and it was magical...I sort of became one with the boat, easing the boat smoothly into a mild turn whenever it listed heavily, then easing it back as the boat began leveling out, in synchronization. If I did it right, I could keep the boat's list pretty constant this way. In a little while, it became instinctive. I then needed to release the sail in severe gusts only, meaning once every hour or two instead of three times a minute. Now that I've gotten my Bravo, I do the same thing with that...fun!

--Bob

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"I wonder why we don't have any LARGE craft advisories? Apparently we don't care about the big boats."

--George Carlin


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 11, 2008 10:44 am 
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B. Kotcher wrote:
I started sailing by taking lessons in a dinghy in a local lake. Then I regularly rented dinghys there. One time I was out with a girl and she said, "sailing is hard work, huh," and I realized that it was--I was having to release the sail every few seconds to keep us from going over with each gust, then pull the sail back in a few seconds later. It was getting to be more work than fun.

Then, from reading in this forum, I learned how people "pinch" in such situations...that is, steer the boat slightly into the wind when this happens. From a physics standpoint, this seems counterintuitive, since it will make it easier for your boat's momentum to carry it all the way over. But this is more than made up for by the reduction in force on the sail, caused by it having a shallower angle to the wind. I tried doing this and it was magical...I sort of became one with the boat, easing the boat smoothly into a mild turn whenever it listed heavily, then easing it back as the boat began leveling out, in synchronization. If I did it right, I could keep the boat's list pretty constant this way. In a little while, it became instinctive. I then needed to release the sail in severe gusts only, meaning once every hour or two instead of three times a minute. Now that I've gotten my Bravo, I do the same thing with that...fun!

--Bob


thanks man1

that's exactly what I learned yesterday
I could control most of the leaning by hiking in and out but when I got really overpowered I just turned slightly into the wind then back out
I was over correcting in a big way but after a while I could anticipate it and just a little would keep me balanced

thanks again!


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