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PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2008 9:54 am 
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I took a sea kayaking class when I first got into kayaking and have been renting kayaks ever since. In class, we used a 1-piece paddle and they taught us a great self-rescue technique where we would put a paddle float over one end of the paddle and put the other end on the kayak to form a "T". You could use the paddle shaft to help get yourself into the kayak - it was surprisingly stable. I just bought an Outback and am wondering if the 2-piece paddle is sturdy enough for this same technique. Any ideas? I realize if you've never seen this technique you probably won't have any idea what I'm talking about based on my description, but hopefully someone has.
Thanks.
Steve


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2008 10:27 am 
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Probably not strong enough. I just broke one last week putting a little too much pressure on it while shifting in my seat. Broke at the center where they connect.

Kayaking Bob


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2008 7:21 am 
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I picked up my Outback yesterday and was feeling the paddle shaft and it felt pretty sturdy, but the joint where the 2 halves meet could be the issue. The other thing I was thinking was that when I'm in the water with one foot on that shaft using it to boost myself into the kayak it definitely won't be my entire weight. I'll probably give it a try and see what happens.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 27, 2008 1:17 pm 
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I keep a paddle float with me at all times. Before I went out on a lake I took the kayak in the pool, and used it with the stock paddle, and had no problem. In fact it allowed me to be able to get back in the kayak, and I am on the larger side. That was my trial run, especially since I was taking it out in Feb. and the lake was in the mid 50's. My pool wasn't much warmer, but I could just jump out and dry off.

I did run a rope so that I can flip it over the opposite side of the kayak, and I measured a few times, then tied a loop into the rope so that I can put my foot in, and it holds the paddle in place and gives me a little boost with my leg.

Since then, I have installed Sidekicks on my Outback, but still take the paddle float with me every time.

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Isaac


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2008 12:08 am 
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Location: Albuquerque
If cold water is an issue check out the premade Northwater floats that don't require you to blow them up...It's a bit more of a hassle for storage but it is foolproof. They also make a great little stirrup

I agree with the issue of the strength of the hobie paddle in the center for this type of activity. I've done it successfully but if it breaks and you really really need it you will of course have a backup paddle that works?


Last edited by Ranger1 on Fri Aug 29, 2008 4:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2008 12:46 pm 
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Location: S.E. Florida
I was a bit disappointed in the hobie paddle that came with my revolution. the connection is sloppy and weak in comparison to a Bending Branches paddle I own from my previous kayak. I do not use the hobie paddle and am considering buying the new T paddle insert to keep it as a backup single blade paddle only.

Self Rescue ... I just wanted to add a helpful hint and one for those who have trouble pulling themselves back up into the SOT or are too short (like my wife) to reach the far side handle to pull yourself back on.
Get a rescue strap with a clip end and a loop on the other end. I found at Home Depot a 3' shock cord with a carabiner clip on each end which also serves the purpose. Clip the strap to a padeye inside the cockpit on the side you wish to enter slip foot into loop or carabiner clipped back onto shock cord to form a loop and use your foot to help hoist yourself higher onto the yak and to reach the opposite handle. This step assist works very well.

I hope the info comes in handy for someone.

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I would rather be kayaking and think about work than to be at work thinking about kayaking.
A Thrill Ride is being dragged around in your kayak for 40 minutes by an extremely large fish.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2012 10:27 pm 
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In a pinch, we've bungeed a life jacket to the end of a paddle to make a paddle float. Did the job.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2012 11:02 pm 
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Hobie two piece paddles are not to be trusted sadly.... :( I would not trust my life to them... Go and by something substantial... a Lendal or Werner or some other very reputable brand. I did however hear that a Werner once broke in this same approach at self rescue....Which is why YOU CARRY A SPARE PADDLE! and why many states have that as a minimum equipment requirement.... Canoe two persons two paddles and one additional spare...


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:26 am 
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You can also carry some good swimfins in the back. Pull them out. Put them on. Duck low in the water and the kick hard as you pull yourself up. You rocket up and over to the far side of the boat. :D


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PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 8:37 am 
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All good suggestions, but is any of this really necessary? I spent 3 days getting to know my long Revo before I started fishing from it. I flipped it dozens of times in the bay and in the surf and had no problems climbing back in. Perhaps that would be different in fresh water because the human body is less buoyant?


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 6:29 am 
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In answer to your question Leif, it's a GREAT idea to have several re-boarding techniques discussed and described as some people don't have the arm strength to pull themselves up without help. I have a tandem, and have never tipped by accident, but have thought and practiced re-boarding techniques with others knowing that my passenger in the front is often a "guest" whom I can't count on a) not freaking out, and b) being able to pull themselves up as I can, and c) are often my wife who sure as hell can't get back up without my assistance, and who fortunately never reads this board :wink: .

In another forum on the subject I posted this simple solution: loop your PFD over your mirage pedal shaft --hanging the PFD over the side which makes the arm hole a handy "step" up. This allows my friends to use their leg along with their arms. Big difference.

In heavy surf where you might not want to take off a PFD, bring along a simple contraption: a rope to loop around the shaft with a heavy dowel 'step' slung at the end of it. Also doubles as a boarding sling for pirate encounters.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 11:59 pm 
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Properly executed, the paddle float idea can be very successful. Kudos to those who actually practice in a operational environment before the need arises. As has been pointed out, there are other options as well.

When you have a larger very stable kayak as sunday does, there are lots of options. The boat has the stability to support nooses, ropes, ladders, etc, especially if a partner is available to assist (although they do not all work for all people). Notice here though that there is no need to be able to reach across -- you just need to get enough of your body on board before your legs slide under the boat (keep kicking). Note, let the boat tilt to keep your threshold height low (Oasis shown).
Image

The smaller, narrower boats are not so forgiving. If you don't start out prone and slide across as Leif suggests, there is an excellent chance of capsizing the boat again before you get aboard. A successful sequence might look like this (Revo 11 shown):
1. legs out
Image

2. push the near rail down as you slide up and over, kicking to keep your legs from slipping under the boat
Image

3. wiggle/pull across until stable. Then roll over.
Image

Looks simple but requires practice to find the technique that works for you, your partner (if appropriate) and your boat. You'll find the best forum advice and demonstration videos are not necessarily appropriate for your needs and operating conditions. As inconvenient as it may be, actual experience is so much better than learning in the middle of the ocean or lake with your gear adrift (as I found out the hard way). Do it if you haven't already done so! 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 11:42 am 
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Thanks for the pictures Roadrunner.
The key as you say is to practice several techniques. Consider WHO is going to be trying to get back in. The guy in the picture (you?) looks like they work out. Some of my tandem kayaking victims are "less athletic".

Additional tip: If you are loaning your kayak to someone, consider their physical ability and give them options. My neighbor lent his kayak to his daughter and boyfriend, who flipped over and she couldn't get back in. So the boyfriend had to tow her to shore. :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2012 2:12 pm 
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In the interest in keeping paddles light a lot of manufacturers do have their achillies heel in the sleeve where one end of a euro joins another. What I would do and others have done to good effect and no real weight gain, is to give it generous wraps of fiberglass cloth "tape". Six ounce tape wrapped a number of times would make it plenty beefy and itd look fine. Either coat it inj uv protective poly urethane or spar varnish or something like interlux catalyst/resin boat hull paint. Eitherway, the epoxy needs UV protection. They sell fiberglass cloth tape in widths similar to the ferrule in question.'


Pete


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2012 4:38 pm 
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Petewp,
In the 'rudder' thread we were talking about the importance of TETHERING yourself to the kayak in certain conditions, and especially if you're going to crawl back to repair/unfoul the rudder. Especially in a kayak rigged for sailing, you noted that the boat can quickly get away from you if you go in. Great point.

So now I'm back to this "self rescue" thread where I've suggested two techniques that work for me regarding using your pfd as a "step", and you've pointed out that the paddle joint might not support its use during the alleged "paddle float rescue maneuver". :mrgreen: Good point.

So it dawns on me:
Your tether can also serve as a rope step up into the boat. Just tie it to your mirage drive to create a step up. (I've simply used my bowline in the past)

Not everyone who kayaks has the upper body physique on display in the above photos. Many ladies I've kayaked with, for example, can't pull themselves back into a kayak with arm strength alone. Perhaps it's easy if you have outriggers. Your tether and looping it over the drive is the obvious answer to two problems.


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