Hobie Cat Forums

It is currently Fri Apr 18, 2014 10:31 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: high wind sailing a 20'
PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2008 5:42 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2008 5:33 pm
Posts: 9
while in yankton,s.d. we dithed it on thursday about 1.5 miles from the
regatta site. we wanted to get back to hobie beach so we pushed off the
beach in 25+ knots with no sails. we beat we wife back to the regatta site
and she was driving. what a ride :D :D I think chris wessels has some pictures.

_________________
MTM Racing


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: H20 GWoT
PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2008 5:47 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Captain

Joined: Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:14 am
Posts: 37
Location: Sioux Falls SD
H20 GWoT:

Send me a line with your email, concact info ect. I'd like to get you on our Division 7 mailing list. I'm a Hobie 20 racer from Sioux Falls, and we would love to have join in, especially some IA races that are close for you.


Paul Bommersach

pbommersbach@sio.midco.net


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2008 7:32 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 6:41 pm
Posts: 198
Location: Commerce Twp, Michigan
J_Eaton wrote:
Quote:
The only way to survive DW on the 20 in the big stuff is go way deep, DO NOT try to heat it up, 20's will pitchpole (for that matter any cat will pitchpole in big wind).


Just wanted to chime in with some tips in sailing a 20 in heavy air. Before acquiring my Tiger, I raced a 20 for many years. Key upwind settings - let the main traveler out about 6-8 inches from center and sheet in HARD. Set the mast rotator so that it points at the rear crossbar/hull corner. Keep the slot open between the mast and jib but don't let the jib luff. Have the crew continuously work the downhaul when the hull raises. Get on the wire (both of you) and sail a trimmed course where the windward hull is just kissing the water...keeping the boat FLAT.

When transitioning to downwind after rounding A, try and keep your speed up in relation to the wind as you bare away. This will lessen the impact of the wind hitting the sail with full force. Do not travel out very far...use the upwind setting. Keep the main sheeted in tight and sail deep. This allows for minimum sailplan to the wind (more of a "glancing blow"). Play out the jib so the tell tales are flowing. If you can...get your boards up (I have my crew pull the windward board just before rounding the weather mark and she'll pull the other one after we round). The boat will trip over itself if the boards are fully extended at speed. For security...get one or both of your feet under the tramp strap. Sailing deep downwind in this manner requires concentration and minimum tiller movement

When gybing, do not make an abrupt turn to the new course. Start to head the boat up ever so slightly until the main gybes over (you might help it by grabbing and forcing over with you hand) and continue to sail very deep on the new course. This is where a lot of boats lose it and end up capsizing. When entering and exiting the gate or C mark...this is where you play out the traveler, main and jib...keeping the boat flat as you spill wind and turn windward at the same time. As the windward transition is being completed, return to your upwind settings.

Usually racing in heavy air is a race of attrition. Your not very fast when you upside down. Concentrate, keep the boat flat, be deliberate in your manuvers and you'll finish well with the pointy end up.

Good Luck.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2008 9:45 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 10:25 am
Posts: 2406
Location: Jersey Shore
Quote:
When gybing, do not make an abrupt turn to the new course. Start to head the boat up ever so slightly until the main gybes over (you might help it by grabbing and forcing over with you hand) and continue to sail very deep on the new course. This is where a lot of boats lose it and end up capsizing.


Very true, gybing the 20 in high wind is definitely challenging. I would add that you want to enter the turn at speed. Try not to slow down before entering the gybe. Also, I found that many times a high wind gybe ends up being an "S" turn. Smoothly enter the turn, then grab the mainsheet and throw it across to the other side and almost simultaneously or just after, straighten the rudders so you're going about dead downwind. Get yourself, the crew and the boat settled on the new tack before heading up. Rounding up too quickly in high wind will put you right over.

sm


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group