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 Post subject: Why a bow line?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 6:52 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 2:32 am
Posts: 1764
Location: Calga NSW, Australia
I notice a number of people on the forum (Roadrunner and Pirate among others) like to have a bow line. I am a big believer in always having some rope on board, but why keep it attached to the bow? In the rare event of needing a tow, or to tie up to a buoy, it would be just as easy to tie the line to the front crossbrace and it can be kept out of the way the rest of the time. What am i missing?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 9:44 pm 
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Location: Bairnsdale, Victoria Australia
All real boats need a bow line attached Chris. :wink: Mine is merely a 5mm multiplait line, clipped at the front and runs back behind me and into the rear cockpit. It can't get in the way or into mischief where it is and has been handy to pull the kayak along when I am swimming. There is a picure on this forum of me swimming both Mickey's and my boats along via bow lines in a river. It is simply there in case it is ever needed like at a wharf or to tie the kayak up if tethered in a river etc. or if I ever needed a tow...Pirate


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 10:13 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2007 11:59 pm
Posts: 94
Location: Danville California/Kahana Maui
I use my bow line to tie up to a tree or branch on the beach so if I forget to haul it up on the grass before the high tide the Hobie stays put and some times I need to tow my other AI with a girl friend through the surf/reef so we can sail the seas off west maui


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:38 am 
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Pirate wrote:
All real boats need a bow line attached Chris. :wink: Mine is merely a 5mm multiplait line, clipped at the front and runs back behind me and into the rear cockpit. It can't get in the way or into mischief where it is and has been handy to pull the kayak along when I am swimming. There is a picure on this forum of me swimming both Mickey's and my boats along via bow lines in a river. It is simply there in case it is ever needed like at a wharf or to tie the kayak up if tethered in a river etc. or if I ever needed a tow...Pirate


and why are you swimming?????


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 2:02 am 
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Location: Bairnsdale, Victoria Australia
Astro wrote:
Pirate wrote:
All real boats need a bow line attached Chris. :wink: Mine is merely a 5mm multiplait line, clipped at the front and runs back behind me and into the rear cockpit. It can't get in the way or into mischief where it is and has been handy to pull the kayak along when I am swimming. There is a picure on this forum of me swimming both Mickey's and my boats along via bow lines in a river. It is simply there in case it is ever needed like at a wharf or to tie the kayak up if tethered in a river etc. or if I ever needed a tow...Pirate


and why are you swimming?????


All to do with attempting to regain my youth Astro....but you are too young to understand :wink: ...Pirate


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:37 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2360
Location: Escondido
I agree with pirate -- all boats should have a bow line rigged at all times.

-- It's a quick tow line if you need it.

-- It's a quick tie off for your boat.

-- You can tether with it (ex -- paddle or unexpected Drive removal)) or from it.

-- It can be used to lock your rudder control by slipping it underneath.

-- I use it on the Adventure as a paddle cradle to keep the paddle from cartwheeling (NA on the AI).

-- If you need it for something else, it's always available. If you're going to carry line, why not stow it in a ready position rather than in some pocket?

I've towed a lot of boats and kayaks. It's always unexpected and sometimes time is of the essence. It's very difficult to tow a boat without a bow line and not nearly as easy to rig quickly under duress.

Here's an example. This was a needlessly difficult tow against sudden "Santa Ana" local winds that came up -- two panicked kids adrift and abandoned by their Dad (who had evidently panicked also ???). Neither boat was rigged with tow lines. Not only was it tough for the first child (I thought she was going to let go), but was pulling my arm out of its socket while making rudder control difficult (awkward to operate with the right hand while struggling with marginal steerage due to a double side load and headwind). What a fiasco!!
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:45 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 4:36 am
Posts: 840
Location: Gippsland Lakes Victoria Australia
Quote:
Posted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 3:37 pm Post subject:

What you least expect happens!


Oh how true :!:

Mickey :roll:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 11:30 pm 
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Location: Calga NSW, Australia
Roadrunner wrote:
Not only was it tough for the first child (I thought she was going to let go), but was pulling my arm out of its socket while making rudder control difficult (awkward to operate with the right hand while struggling with marginal steerage due to a double side load and headwind). What a fiasco!!


Roadrunner, if you had been in an AI and had the rope available in the cockpit, couldn't you have tied it to the rear crossbrace and saved your shoulder? Obviously, the girls needed a bowline, since they didn't have the luxury of a crossbrace.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 1:30 am 
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Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
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Location: Escondido
With the AI, for lite towing under sail (where maneuvering speed is possible), tying the line off on the crossbar is probably a great idea. I think Bob does this using a bridle (to avoid the rudder) and in-line bungee to give or absorb slack due to swells. 8)


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 Post subject: Bow lines rock!
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2009 5:48 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:19 pm
Posts: 72
Location: Jackson Hole, Wyoming
Howdy!

Yup, rig your bow line up all the time. This is an excellent question and thread to share with others.

I store the excess line under the the bungees of the front hatch. It actually looks good if you learn how to dress lines.

Reasons I always use my 30 foot bowline:
-It's always accessible to be towed or tow another craft if necessary.
-There are an infinite number of reasons you may need line in short order on a boat. My line is always there, right in front of me. No, in emergency you don't have to crawl to the bow of the boat to untie it. Simply cut it with the knife you should be ALWAYS carry on the PFD you ALWAYS wear.
-You never know when you'll have to walk and drag your boat somewhere else... On Lake Powell last fall, we enjoyed lunch on a windy beach. BIG winds kicked in. We couldn't sail or peddle offshore into it's face. What to do? We simply grabbed our bow lines and pulled the boats thru manky up and down waist deep water 150 ft. to the wind shadow behind a small island. This gave us the launch time and distance needed to beat our way out of that hell hole. Without the bowlines readily accessible, these lines would have been deeply buried in the hulls under a lot of gear.
-It encourages you to ALWAYS tie up the boat while camping. A friend of mine knew someone who derided his insistence kayaks ALWAYS be tied up at night. She refused, saying, "I've dragged my boat far enuff in; it's safe." You've guessed it. She eventually woke to find her boat had vanished during a late night severe storm. She was on an island!!! LUCKILY, the kayak had drifted back onto that same island. They might have needed rescue from people thinking "Stupid!" if this wouldn't have happened.
-A bow line is ultra fashionable. Other knowledgeable yakers will glance at you and think, "Now there's a well dressed boat!"

Happy Trails!

Chris

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:42 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 2:32 am
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Location: Calga NSW, Australia
Thanks for the replies, guys.

Chris, a photo of a "well dressed" line would be nice :)

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2009 4:05 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:19 pm
Posts: 72
Location: Jackson Hole, Wyoming
Howdy from NW Wyoming!

Sorry, I can't post a picture of a "well dressed line" as our AI's are in the back yard under a shoveled off tarp, awaiting sailing in mid June when 3 feet of lake ice melts.

Chris

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:57 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:34 pm
Posts: 138
Location: Northern VA
Hi Chris,

While not a great picture of a "well dressed" bow line, you can see them. I also keep my line coiled under the bungees of the forward hatch. The line is a 24ft, 1/2in, 3 strand mooring line, with the loop choked around the forward aka crossbar as an attachment point. Probably a heavier line than necessary, but it was what I had available in the length I wanted. I've also tried braided mooring lines, but found that the first time it gets pinched by the Mirage Drive mechanisms while laying in the cockpit, it starts to "bleed" interior braiding.

I find that keeping the line attached more amidships makes it handier to use when tying up along side, either at a dock, or to another boat. It's also far enough forward to be immediately used if I need to be towed, but still far enough aft that the line can be passed to another craft to offer a tow. I keep a shackle on the bow padeye, should we need to pass it directly over the bow. Looks like one of the shackles has been removed in these photos, but be assured that it was back in place by the next sail.


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I'll see if I can get a better picture the next time I'm over to where the boats are stored.

Happy Sailing,
- Jim L


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:39 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 2:32 am
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Location: Calga NSW, Australia
Thanks Jim - Those photos are quite clear. You and Chris from Wyoming both seem to agree that a long line, coiled under the front bungees is the way to go. You only differ on whether to tie it to the bow or the front crossbrace. I think I will emulate your setup, including the bow shackle.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 7:01 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:21 pm
Posts: 2157
Location: Maui, Hawaii
I use a ~8' bow line, but also carry a ~100' throw-rope. The bow line is always in place and readily available for it's purpose, and the throw-rope for rescue, anchoring or when the bow line needs extending.

Kayaking Bob
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