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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2009 12:15 pm 
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Hi all,

We're just laying down the groundwork to organize a 1000 km (625 mile) cat race that will circumnavigate Vancouver Island in the Pacific Northwest.

The event will be limited to 10 teams and will span 8 days with a tentative start date of July 2, 2011 with the finish on July 9, 2001. Use the GT300 as a warm up and you're up here in a few days.

Here's a developing map of the course:
http://maps.google.ca/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&h ... 162598&z=7

We're going to do a test run in July 2010 with a few boats to scout for the best beach locations as well as to cache some supplies for the following year. If anyone is interested in joining us, we'll have a 20' Zodiac to accompany us.

If you wish to be kept in the loop as things firm up, please email me at gauci_d@hotmail.com.


Many thanks,

David Gauci
gauci_d@hotmail.com

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2009 10:08 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 9:59 am
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Location: Mill Creek, WA
Will the 10 teams have to provide proof of their ability to travel back in time? :shock:

Start date:July 2, 2011

Finish date: July 9, 2001 :wink:

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 1:05 am 
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Absolutely. That skill will prove invaluable in an event such as this;)

I stand corrected. July 2 - July 9 2011 are the proposed dates.

So...what do you think? Think we can find 10 teams crazy enough to take the challenge?

David
H21SE #195

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 Post subject: Long Distance Race
PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 9:12 am 
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Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
The follow up posts on interest and qualified skippers will come around when they have an understanding of the course. I know you are working on this but facts such as wind on the open exposed west side of the island is important to me. Also rollers. Do you think there is historical data during the week selected that could be part of the package. This would allow people to know if they are sailing within their limit.
It might be an idea to seek out an organizer of the Worrel 1000 to pick up planning tips.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:44 am 
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Location: Oklahoma City, OK
By all means, pick up planning tips from the Worrell guys...especially the one where you cancel the event yet keep everyone's money.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:51 am 
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Location: Clear Lake Iowa
This is awesome actually, because I just ordered a Flux Capasitor for my Hobie 16. Now, I should maybe get a chute for her, so I can get her up to 88 mph......


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 4:29 pm 
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Location: Seattle, Washington
Some Vancouver Island refference material:
http://www.pacificshipwrecks.ca/english/index.html
"The treacherous shores of Vancouver Island, BC, Canada contain 1.5 shipwrecks per mile."

Some Tide and Current Info
http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/cgi-bin/tide-shc.cgi?queryType=showRegion&language=english&region=1

It could be quite chalenging to sail in areas that typically have tidal ranges of 10-15 feet of exchange causing massive swirling current around rocky shores.

I am confused, tell me again what is so appealing about sailing around this island that outweighs the rocks, the current, the freezing your ass off water, and the typically crappy weather?

Oh ya the beautifull coast line, not sure i really want to see that up close on my beach cat.

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Mike Hensel
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Wind in your sails, water in your shoes, great day!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 1:30 am 
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Hey Mike,

Thanks for the links, I've been pouring over historical data from the Fisheries and Oceans sites and buoys for some time but I hadn't been to the shipwreck site. In all fairness, I managed to find a few sites focused on Shipwrecks of the Florida Keys that documented its fair share of wrecks itself. You obviously have a healthy respect for the sea and I respect that. I expect considerable skepticism over this event as being "over the top" and risky but I firmly believe that systems can be put into place that can minimize the risk to those involved. Make no mistake, there will be plenty of risk no mattter how well one plans.

Keeping the event small would allow a few suitable chase boats to keep close enough to each team to render effective assistance. Today's navigational and satellite aids can pinpoint waypoints as well as boats in distress within meters. Handheld VHF & GPS tracking, cell phones, drysuits, favourable prevailing winds and the proximity to land offer some security on this race as do the significant water traffic from tourism and fishing. And don't forget the powerful tool that we have with the internet allowing our community forums such as these as a venue to share their experience and insite thereby leaving no stone unturned in making this as safe as possible.

But yes, these positives also tempered by the inherent and significant risks such as 325 miles of open ocean to one side, and desolate, rocky shoreline on the other, 70 miles of shoreline that has no road access, significant currents, tides, deadheads, whales, uncharted rocks, no wind, too much wind,..the list is endless. How do we handle a serious breakdown that disables a boat 2 miles offshore but 40 miles from the nearest road? How do we effectively scout the bail-out sites if things go awry on the ride down the outside? Yep...there's a lot to consider. Again, these forums I'm certain will shake out many other risks but also, solutions.

In response to your question, "I am confused, tell me again what is so appealing about sailing around this island that outweighs the rocks, the current, the freezing your ass off water, and the typically crappy weather?", my answer would be the classic, "Cause it looks like it would make an incredible adventure those fortunate few that take part in this event."


Thanks again for your comments Mike. Keep em coming.

David

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:28 pm 
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Hi all,

Just an update on this crazy-assed idea of mine to organize a bunch of boats to sail around Vancouver Island. After speaking and emailing a bunch of very helpful people over the past few years, having generous offers of communications gear, chase boats and other safety requirements and studied wind and current histories, I've decided that I have too much on my plate to organize the event and limited time in which to do it all. My project for my sailing resort in Mahahual, Mexico will see both of my H21 SE's shipped down next year so its now or never as this will be the last summer these boats are in Canada.

I'm planning to sail the 1000 km's (650 mi) around Vancouver Island starting on Saturday, June 30th from Nanaimo with finish in Nanaimo from 4 to 9 days later depending on how I break up the trip. There is a near full moon for the entire 9 days and a very rare long and favourable slack tide on July 1st that will make it easier to get through Seymour Narrows. From there, its hit the gas and go. I'll go in the premise of sailing as long as I can each day depending on conditions. Given that we have over 16 hours of daylight at this time of year, we can stretch our legs and rip through the good days affording us the choice of staying ashore if the weather turns ugly. In the end, as remote as we'll get, worst case scenario, we bail onshore somewhere so its not like being 400 miles offshore.

The trip will definitely be a memorable one with tons of orcas, whales, dolphins and other marine life coupled with incredible scenery and challenging sailing. The rough plan is 8 - 12 hours of sailing each day with the last few hours spent finding and setting up camp for the night. We can cache food and supplies at a few of our stops and a number of them will be in developed areas so we can re-stock there. All in all, its a crazy plan but completely doable in a safe way with proper planning and equipping.

Who wants to join me?

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