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PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2005 3:19 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2005 3:06 pm
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Location: New Hampshire
Hi All,
I'm right on the verge of pulling out the checkbook and getting an Outback Fisherman. I test drove a regular outback yesterday, and I have a couple of concerns.

First, I didn't think it paddled all that great. Granted, I'm not a world class kayaker, but I thought it was wandering around quite a bit. Even with the rudder. Was this due to my inexperience, or is it the nature of the Outback?

Second, now that I've sat in the Outback I can see the amount of water that's in the "bilge" area, around the Mirage drive. It was no big deal yesterday (80 degrees) but I'm having second thoughts about how friendly that might seem when it's 50 degrees, say in April or September. Will I need to wear waterproof boots? Waders? (I'm 210 pounds, and the water was coming up around the drive, but not slopping over the ridge on the rear of the "bilge." Sort of what I'd expect.)

Third, does the Quest have a similar amount of water in the bottom, or is that area fairly dry, save for a couple of scupper holes?

From where I sit now, it looks like a Quest (or a SIK) would be usable for six months in New England, where the Outback would be usable for three.

Am I missing anything here? Can anyone shed any light on the Quest? What do people do with SOTs on the ocean in the spring??

Thanks,

Larry


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 8:16 am 
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Location: Out There
Hi Larry-Don't worry about the water around the Mirage drive unit. Your feet are going to be on the pedals, not in the bilge. I have a Quest and rarely use the scupper plugs. There's always a little water in the boat, no big deal. With kayaking, I don't think you'll ever be completely dry.
To keep warm, you can use a "splash suit" or pants that are waterproof. I use a wetsuit in cold conditions, that works pretty good as well. You can probably pick up a used "farmer john" wetsuit pretty cheap.
The Quest is fast and stable, lots of room for gear and bait tank. The Outback Mirage system is pretty cool, hands free for fishing. Depends on which way you want to go.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 9:25 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2005 3:06 pm
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Location: New Hampshire
Thanks for the input!

I guess I'm used to a bit of water in a SIK - dripping off the paddle, coming in on your feet - but the Outback seemed like it was quite a bit. I'm also used to dressing for the weather, but not exactly with waterproof boots. So that would be a bit different.

I think right now I'm leaning toward the Quest. (I have a few days to decide, as my dealer has an order coming in "in a few days...")

When you say you rarely use the scupper plugs, you mean they aren't inserted, and you get a small but negligible amount of water in the bilge? And, I assume, by using the scupper plugs I could reduce that amount of water? And also reduce the ability to drain the kayak if a wave hit?

Larry


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 4:37 pm 
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Location: Out There
If you go out in the ocean or a river, somewhere where water may come in the boat, scuppers let the water drain out. If you went through waves, like through the surf or maybe wind waves, with the scupper plugs in, the boat would fill up with water and become very hard to maneuver. If you are in a lake or calm water and you don't want to get wet, put the plugs in and almost no water will come into the boat.
I like the Quest because it is very stable. I go out in the ocean alone quite a bit and I value a stable boat. I just made a live bait tank for my kayak that adds quite a bit of weight(it's about 5 gallons of water plus the battery and pump), the Quest handled the extra weight no problem. Also, I've been kayaking for a few years so I may be a bit old school to prefer paddle over pedal.
On the other hand, I was fishing with some guys who used the Mirage system. They were able to fish very easily because they didn't need their hands to paddle. The boats using the Mirage drive move along pretty quickly. I wouldn't mind having an Outback myself.
You should take the Quest and Outback for a test paddle and see which one you like. Can't really go wrong either way.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 10:24 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2005 5:21 pm
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Larry A wrote:
...but I thought it was wandering around quite a bit. Even with the rudder. Was this due to my inexperience, or is it the nature of the Outback?
Hi Larry. I took out a regular kayak today and found it almost impossible to turn because I'm so used to the small turning radius and quick responsiveness of the Outback. You may call it wandering but it is real handy when it comes to turning.

Quote:
...but I'm having second thoughts about how friendly that might seem when it's 50 degrees, say in April or September. Will I need to wear waterproof boots?
That is a good question. In 50 degree weather, when pedaling, I find it necessary be barefooted and in shorts so as not to overheat. In real cold weather, I wear calf high Chota boots that are as comfortable as socks and waterproof. Plus, wear clothing that wicks away moisture. No need to stop kayaking due to a little cold weather. That little bit of water in the Outback doesn't get my feet wet.


Last edited by Rnykster on Thu Jun 16, 2005 5:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Quest / Outback
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 11:31 am 
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Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 12:44 pm
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Location: Oceanside, California
Quest / Outback

Water in the foot well area is mostly due to the design idea that sitting as low as possible in a boat is more stable and having your feet even lower is more comfortable for paddling. Depending on your weight and amount of gear there can be more water there.

Outbacks are designed primarily for the drive system. Paddling is definitely an afterthought with Hobie Mirage Kayaks. You only paddle if you have to because the drive system works so well. The keel was designed for better turning... not tracking like you need in a paddle boat. Using the pedals and holding the rudder will track the boat straight as you like.

Cold in a sit-on-top? We are working on a battented dodger for the leg area. Would fit the Outback and Sport. That would keep the wind and spray off your legs. What kind of interest do you have in something like this? Should be nearly as warm as a sit inside. Pricing for a nice Dodger can be under $100.00

_________________
Matt Miller
Director of Parts and Accessory Sales
Hobie Cat USA


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 7:24 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2005 3:06 pm
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Location: New Hampshire
Thanks, Matt.

The dodger sounds like a good idea, although I am currently leaning toward the Quest so hope you would offer one for that as well.

Would this be a nylon, semi-supported type affair?


Larry


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 Post subject: Fishing from outback
PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2005 10:08 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 10:17 pm
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Location: Felton, CA.
(my opinoin is slightly biased) My outback is the only kayak I've had a pleasure to use, so I can't comment on any regular padle type yaks. (yet) Having said that, I'm not sure I'd like any other style of kayak now! The kind of fishing I like to do, lake trolling, I can do on my outback. I can also bass fish. With just a touch of the rudder every now & then I can cover a huge area in a short time. I can't imagin covering the same amout of area while padling/fishing, not getting "tripped up" while switching from padle to fish pole.
The first time I had my outback on our local lake, I wore my street cloths(jeans, tee, tennis shoes) my pants were dry when I finished. (water was flat though, no wakes)
There is water in the bottom of the drive area, but it's only a little over an inch deep, my feet were 90% of the time up on the pedles, away from the water.
As mentioned above, my outback is the very first kayak I've been in, so I know I'm an inexperienced paddler, however, I had no problems manuvering her around (mainly reverse gear)
I look at owning my yak as having 2 yaks in one. I can pedle till I feel my legs getting tired (after 7yrs of mountian biking, it takes a while for them to get tired!) and when that happens I can switch to paddling! I can get a dual body workout all in one boat. And because I use the drive 98% of the time, I stay dry due to not having water falling off the padle I'm not using.
I must confess though I'm thinking about buying an inflatable kayak for a quick grab & go yak. I have very limited storage at my home, and getting my outback ready for use takes a little work. (kinda discourging right now)


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